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coiiiiEGE rrtws 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume }V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, January 14, 1913 Ho. 8 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Deutscher Verein 

The Deutsche Verein held its month- 
ly meeting on Wednesday, Dec. 1912, 
at 7 :30 p. no., at which time their 
Xmas program was rendered consist- 
ing of German songs, a paper "Weih- 
nachten," Paul Bowman, German 
solos by Miss Schmidt, of the vocal 
department, and an Original Story by 
Florence Mentz. After the literary 
program the club with their friends 
and visitors were socially enter- 
tained. They were served with the 
usual delicacies that come with 
Xmas. The room was handsomely 
decorated with a Xmas tree, Mistle- 
toe and Holly. In short German 
customs were closely adhered to and 
carried out. Everybody left with 
commendatory words for the club, 
wrrds of praise for the committee in 
charge of preparation. All were highly 
pleased with the evening's entertain- 
ment. 

The following program will be ren- 
dered Jan. 14, 7 p. m. : Vereingesang, 
Ach wie ist's nioglich; Der Ring der 
Nibelungen, Fraulein Larene Engle, 
Edgar Landis; Deklamation, "Der 
Handschuh", John Long; Dialog, 
"Ansere Fiertage", Franlein Urich, 
Fraulein Risser; Vereingesang, Die 
Wacht am Rhine. Everybody wel- 
come. 

Resolutions of Condolence 

We, the committee of (he Kaloze- 
tean Literary Society of Lebanon Val- 
ley College submit the following: 

WHEREAS: it has pleased God in 
His all wise providence to call from 
labor to reward an esteemed alumnus 
and staunch friend, Brother U. S. G. 
Renn, and whereas we deeply regret 
the departure of a most efficient chris- 
tian worker, therefore 

Resolved, That, in his death, we, 
£ s a society, have lost a tiuly 
devoted, thoroughly loyal friend, and 



that we wi'l ever hold him in grate- 
ful memory. 

Resolved, That his efforts both in 
our society and in his divinely 
sanctioned work have always been to 
us an example of unswerving 
allegiance to Kalozetean and Chris- 
tian principles. 

Resolved, that we tender his 
bereaved companion and children our 
sincere sympathy and condolence in the 
loss of a kind husband and loving 
father. 

Resolved, that these resolutions be 
recorded on the minutes of the society 
and that copies of the same be senr 
to the family of the deceased, to 
Lebanon Valley "College News," and 
to the "Annvilie Journal." 

Signed 
George A. Williams 
V. W. Jamison, 
Harry M. Bender 

Committe 

Announcement 

Miss Helen Rue, who is interested 
in settlement work among those 
mountains of Kentucky, which are the 
scenes of several of the stories of 
John Fox, Jr., will speak to the stu- 
dents of her wcrk, on Tuesday evening 
in prayer meeting. She will have an 
extremely interesting stnry to relate 
and the students and faculty are urged 
to come out. Miss Rue is traveling 
about the country for the purpose of 
lecturing on this work and it is 
through the efforts of Mr. Victor 
Weidler, '10, that Miss Kue will 
spend a day here. 

Biological Field Club 

January 15, 7 p. m. 
The "Typhoid" Fly, Its Life, His- 
tory and Anatomy, Russel Weidler; 
Its Enemies and Diseases, Carl 
Schmidt; Its Economic Importance, 
L. A. Rodes; How to Destroy It. 
E. Stengle. Visitors Welcome. 



Calendar 

Tuesday, Jan. 14— Lecture by Miss 
Helen Rue in Prayer meeting. 

Wednesday, Jan. 15 — Deutscher 
Verin, Biological Field Club. 

Thursday, Jan. lfi— Sophronean so- 
ciety. 

Friday, Jan. 17, 7:15 — Literary 
societies. 

Sunday, Jan. 19— Christian Associa- 
tions. 

January, 20-24- Examinations. 
Tuesday, Jan. 21— Prayer meeting. 

Gave Entertainment 

On Saturday evening, Jan. 11, the 
Concert Company of Lebanon Va.ley 
College gave a very pleasing enter- 
tainment, to a large and appreciative 
audience, in the Grace U. B. Church 
at Lickdale, Pa. The program was 
made very interesting by the variation 
of the numbers rendered, which con- 
sisted of readings; vocal, piano, 
trombone, and violin solos, and quar- 
tettes. 

The cast consisted of V. W. Jam- 
ison, reader; G. F. Botts. bass solo- 
ist; J. F. Arnold, pianist; T. B. 
Lyter, trombone; P. A. Statton, 
violinist; and H. M. Bender, tenor. 

Basket Ball Schedule 

Jan. 11— Gettysburg at Gettysburg. 
Jan. 17— Bucknell at Lewisburg. 
Jan. 18 — Susquehanna at Selinsgrove 
Jan. 25— Muhlenberg at Allentown. 
Jan. 30— York Professionals at York 
Jan. 31— Open. 

Feb. 1— P. M. C. at Chester (pend- 
ing). 

Feb. 8 -Ablnght at Annville (pend- 
ing)- 

Feb. 15— Co. H at Lebanon. 
Feb. 21— Susquehanna at Annville. 
Feb. 28— Mt. St. Mary's at Em- 
initsburg (pending). 

Mar. 4— Delaware at Newark. 
Mar. 5— Open. 

Mar. 8— Muhlenberg at Annville. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College J^ettts 



Issued weekly during 1 the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 
CLARA HORN, '13 
Athletics 
IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 
General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
Assistants 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Subscription Price S1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building' Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

The time has arrived once more 
when many of us resolve to ourselves 
that we are going to transform our 
lives from the earthly realm to an 
id°al one by a few resolutions. We 
sometimes think that the secret of 
making our lives useful and worth 
while, depends in turning our atten- 
tion and energy in some opposite di- 
rection from which we have been aim- 
ing. And fail to realize that our fu- 
ture usefulness depends to a large 
extent on what we have done in the 
past and what we are doing at the 
present time. To find out just what 
is worth while, has been the great 
problem of the ages, how to ac- 
complish, how to succeed. For its 
solution men have spent days and 
weeks and centuries developing sys- 
tems and theories and courses of 
study. Institutions of learning have 
been erected on almost every hill top. 
Employers are spending their time in 
teaching others to do what they them- 
selves have done, and as a result of 
this preparation and the tremendous 
energy that has been spent in self- 
improvement and in the improvement 
of others, we have a civilization all 
our own. 



The real difference between those 
who succeed and those who don't, is 
that the one thinks he can, and works 
to accomplish his purpose, while the 
other thinks he cannot, and gives up 
with imaginary defeat. He first 
learns that he can do things only by 
working until his purpose is realized 
and the idea arouses, thrills, and 
inspires him. The second thinks that 
all the great things were intended 
for some one rise, except one day in 
the year when ho resolves to make 
resolutions to do something, so he 
misses the great experiences, the 
great trials and the great rewards. 
Anything that is worth while must 
come as the result of one's own efforts, 
and not in the mere forming resolu- 
tions, or at the expense of others. 
Successful lives are never measured 
by the forming of good resolutions, 
and are seldom built up by tearing 
others down. When a person allows 
deceit to become a part of his working 
capital, all that is noble in him with- 
ers and dies. Tha one who deceives 
others deceives himself. The kind 
and noble sentiments of the better 
self are gradually stunted and dwarfed 
and paralyzed until often the baser 
nature is left. If this be true surely 
the little acts we practice daily will 
count much more in making our lives 
worth while than all the annual or 
semi-annual resolutions we can make. 
There are many times if our memo- 
ries would work readily we would 
have no need for resolutions. For 
instance in our school life, if we 



could remember that a gentleman 
never smokes in the dining hall, or 
in the presence of ladies; that the 
dining hall is a place to dine and not 
a gymnasium; that it shows ill breed- 
ing to read newspapers during chapel 
exercises or in the class rooms while 
a recitation convenes: that the chairs 
in the recitation rooms have four legs 
and may all be used at the same time: 
that in the class room men's heads 
should be higher than their feet. 
These are a few things that can be 
adjusted by the practice of the 
memory and ought to be avoided. 
If we would teach ourselves to think 
before we act there would be no time 
to make resolutions and as a result 
none to break. 

Y. W. C. A. 

The meeting on Sunday, Jan. 12, 
was conducted by Miss Edith Lehman. 
The leader gave a very interesting 
description of the World in Baltimore, 
particularly the exposition. Miss 
Spes.°ard spoke for tha pageant. 

A number of pictures of the World 
were shown. 

Mathematical Round Table 

Modern Methods in Mathematics, 
Elizabeth Rechard ; Analytic Geometry 
Historically Considered, Edith Leh- 
man; Scope and Tendencies of Modern 
Mathematics, George Williams. 

Mr. C. Y. Ulrich, '13, and Mr. 
Victor M. Heffelfinger, '13. spent 
Saturday and Sunday at ;he home 
of Mr. Ulrich at Manheim. 



SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS, JAN. 20-23. 



THURSDAY WED. TUESDAY MONDAY 


8 to 10 


10 to 12 


1 to 3 


Philosophy 3 
German 2 
Greek 2 
Chemistry 5 
English 5a 


Mathematics 3 
Sociology 
Bible 1 
English lb 


Latin 3 
Chemistry 1 
Mathematics 1 
Greek 1 


English 1 
Mathematics 4 
English - 


Economics 1 
Latin I 
1 Siology la 
English 4 
Agriculture 


German 1 
History 5 
French 3 


Physics 1 
Greek lb 
History 1 
English 3 


French 2 
History 2 
Ed. 7 
1 tiolpgy 2 
Chemistry 5 


French 1 
German 3 
English 9 


Biology lb 
Bible 3 
Chemistry 2 


1 'hilosophy 1 
Greek 1 
Astronomy 


Greek 2c 
German 5 
Latin 4 
EL 10 



COLLE GE N E V, 7 S 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 
Piano Duet, Ruth Quigley, Vera 
Myers; Comments on My High School 
Training, Florence Mentz; Piano solo, 
Mary Spayd ; Parcel Post System, 
Edna Yarkers ; Reading, Josephine 
Uric'n; Book Review, Viola Gruber ; 
Olive Branch, Editor. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
By Wireless, Harold Wrightstone; 
Women in Politics, George Haver- 
stock; Debate: Resolved, That Old 
Maids and Bachelors should be Taxed. 
Affirmative, Sedic Rine, Harold Ris- 
ser, John Ness; Negative. Paul Bow- 
man, Allen Engle, Clarence Ulrich; 
Vocal solo, W. C. Carl; Capital vs. 
Labor, E. H. Smith; Don't, L. A. 
Rhodes. 

KALOZETEAN 
Famous Americans Born in Janu- 
ary, Benjamin Franklin, Geo. Hall- 
man; Piano solo, F. Arnold ; Stone- 
wall Jackson, Faber Stengle; Robert 
E. Lee, EL Charlton; Chorus, society; 
Wra. McKinley, Alien Walters; Ex- 
aminer, Editor. 

SOPHRONEAN 
1912 in Retrospect, H. E. Scheaf- 
fer; Outlook for 1913, R. II. Arndt: 
Whistling Duet, Harold Wrighstone, 
Harold Risser: Debate: Resolved, 
That a Diligent Student Will Gain 
More Information From Reading Than 
From Observation. Affirmative, Allen 
Engle, Geo. Hallman. Negative, I. 
H. Albright, R. E. Hoffer; Piano 
solo, Mabel Snyder; Original Story, 
Robert McClure; Live Wire, Editor. 

Y. M. C. A. 

The first Sunday of the new year 
was joint session of the Christian 
Associations. | Mr. Russel Weidler, 
'14, had charge of the meeting. His 



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Clean linens are essential. If 
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"Put this down as a rule," savs Dr. Bardeen- 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers' 
Agencies either has heen refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
erg) of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued "as hopefully 
and as good nam redly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inex peri-need In securing positions. 

Every year since 1995 we have been in need of 
more applicants to 1111 the best positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school work. 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

P. L. MYERS & CO,, 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co- 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COLLEGE NEWS 



subject was "On Resolutions for the 
year 1913." Mr. Weidler showed 
that it is better for us in our busy 
lives to aim high— make good resolu- 
tions—even though we do fail in 
reaching the ideal whkh we have 
before us; make an honest effort— 

"Better to have loved and lost 
Than never to have loved at all." 

So better to have tried and failed 
than never to have tried at all. 



The second meeting of the year was 
lead by Mr. M. H. Wert '13. He took 
for hid subject "Perseverance" and 
read for the lesson Mat. 26:36 - 47, in 
which the disciples were to watch 
while Jesus would depart from them 
to pray, but each time Jesus returned 
he found them fast asleep. 

From this scripture lesson a very 
pracitcal lesson was drawn — how that 
God often commends duties to us, but, 
when he returns he finds we have not 
been persevering and have fallen 
asleep-instead of watching. 

The attendance in the beginning of 
the year has been good. Keep it up, 
Students and Faculty, let's boost our 
Christian Associaions the remainder of 
the school year. 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 

Saturday evening, January the 
fourth, Esther Heintlzeman, '16, en- 
tertained in honor of Misses Emma 
Dickson and Helen Metz, of Cham- 
bersburg. The evening was passed 
in playing interesting and exciting 
games. 

Miss Grace Jackson, of Harris- 
burg was a guest of Mary Daugherty, 
'16, recently. 

Messrs. Paul Loser, ex '13, and 
Earl Loser, ex '13, both of Muhlen- 
berg were visitors in town, 

Miss Florence E. Christes^n, '13, 
attended a party at Lebanon last 
week. 



Have You Heard the New 

Alma Mater t 

Music by f. F. Loos, '02 
Words by S, F. Oldham, '02 

HARRY H. CHARLTON 

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Washington Hotel 

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Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
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Write for catalogue 
ffiev. S. *D. Sossarcij ^President 
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COIiliEGE 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, January 21, 1913 



fio. 9 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



President's Reception 
to the Class of 1913 



Thursday evening, January 16th, 
President and Mrs. Gossard enter- 
tained the class of 1913, at their 
home on Sheridan Avenue. The en- 
tertainment-was in the form of a 
musicale given by a few of our 
talented students. The following was 
the program : Piano, An den Friihl- 
ing, Edward Grieg, Mary Spayd; 
Solo, Where E'er You Go, Handel, 
Lester Rodes ; Reading, The Plant 
That Lost Its Berry, Annie Tumbrell 
Slossoo, Miss Helen Brightbill; Solo, 
1 Hear You Calling Me, Charles 
Marshall, Miss Gingrich; Viulin, 
Berecuse from ' ' Jocelyn, " B. Godard, 
Mr. Statton; Trumbone, Love's Old 
Sweet Song, Mclloy, Mr. Lyter; 
Readkig, The Delectable Ballad of 
the Waller Lot, Eugene Field, Miss 
Brightbill; Solo, "It is I Love, Mr. 
Rodes; Trumbone and violin, Thro the 
Leaves, Serenade, Schubert, Messrs. 
Lyter and Statton ; Solo, "Carriss- 
irna" Miss Gingrich; Piano, Morgen- 
stirmnung, Grieg, Miss Spayd. After 
the rendition of this excellent pro" 
gram all joined in the songs of L. V. 
C. Delicious r efreshments minister- 
ed to the inner man. After a social 
chat the guests departed first 
having shown a little of their appre- 
ciation by a rousing class yell. 



Weary And Depressed, Cheer 
Up 

On Wednesday evening, January 
29, Dr. William A. Coliedge, D. D , 
F. P. G. S. will present the third 
number of the Star Course. He has 
explored the dark depths of Africa 
With Henry M. Stanley. He has 
fought in three wars with the Arabs. 
A recital of we'ird and wonderful 



experiences is the result of these so- 
journs. Dr. Coliedge is a fluent and 
graphic speaker. He is the possessor 
of a pleasing voice, perfect delivery 
and remarkable versatility. Under 
the spell of his delightful presentation 
you forget your fears, griefs, wants, 
pains, anxieties, troubles and cares. 
■You simply smile, then laugh. All 
people possessed with melancholy 
are advised to stay at home. 



Freshman Banquet 

The happy Freshmen played the 
"Sneak" Friday by going to Harris- 
burg for their banquet. Several times 
before they were accused of planning 
to go but they said "it was a fake. " 
This time the class succeeded without 
much trouble. The banquet was held 
at the Metropolitan Hotel. Their 
Toast Master was Robert Hartz and 
the responses were "Our Class," 
Josephine Mathias; "Our Girls," 
Huber Heintzleman; ' Our Boys," 
Esther Heintzleman; "The Sophs," 
Mason Long. 



Biological Field Club 

The meeting of the Field Club last 
Wednesday night was an interesting 
one. Two excellent papers were 
read, one by Mr. Russel Weidler, '14, 
on the "Life, History and Anatomy 
of the Fly," Another one by Mr. 
Fab°r Stenale on "How to Destroy 
the Fly " Then followed a discus- 
sion by Prof. S. H. Derickson. 
This discussion touched on many 
points of interest in the development 
and life of the fly. 

The meeting was as entertaining 
as instructive from the opening to i s 
adjournment. 

There will be a business meeting of 
the club Jan. 25, at which time officers 
for the ensuing year will be elected. 




Alumni 



Mr. Ralph Engle, '06, will sail in 
two weeks for Vienna, Austria, where 
he will spend a year studying medi- 
cine. Mr. Engle is now vi&itng at 
his home in Palmyra. 

Miss Edith Alice Gingrich, Conser- 
vatory 1911, announce! her engage- 
ment to Mr. Clair F. Harnish, '12, 
on Saturday afternoon, January 19. 
The announcement was made to a 
crowd of Annville girls at the home 
of Miss Gingrich. 

Miss Reba F. Lehman, '00, was 
elected to a position as head of the 
Reference Dep't. cf the city library 
of Spokane, Wash. Miss Lehman 
will take charge of her work, 
May 1, 1913. 



Basket Ball 

Lebanon Valley defeatd Susquehanna 
on the iatter's floor, Saturday, Jan. 
18th. The game was hard fought. 

Line-up : 

Lebanon Valley Positions Susquehanna 
Strickler forward P'ollmer 

Dearolf forward Witmer 

Miller center Swope 

Snavely guard Shannon 

Schmidt guard Middlesworth 

Goals from field — Strickler 7; 
Dearolf, 3; Smith, Folmer, Whitmer 
2; Swope, Middlesworth ; Goals from 
fouls, Strickler 2, Dearolf 3. Referee, 
Moorehead, State College. Timer, 
Yarrick, U. of P. 

Lebanon Valley and Bucknell met 
Friday and the game resulted in a 
victory for the latter, 31-22. The 
game was very close. At the beginn- 
ing of the second half the score was 
in favor of Lebanon Valley, Buck- 
nell scoring the winning points near 
the end of the game. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fierjus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULiHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 

CLARA HORN, '13 
A thirties 

IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 
J. P. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

Assistants 
HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to ■ all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

"To thine own self be true, and it 
must follow as the night, the day, 

Thou canst not then be false to any 
man," 

These words of wise old Shake- 
speare apply these days to a very 
tender and delicate subject. It is 
a subject that is hated by some, 
laughed at by others and avoided by 
most "of us. The subject expressed 
in college slang would be named 
"cribbing," and in pure twentieth 
century English it would be denned as 
the taking or giving of help during 
an examination either through an- 
other student or through prepared 
notes. 

Since all of the afore mentioned 
attitudes toward this institution (for 
such it has become) cannot be right, 
which one should be ours? 

In order to look at the question 
fairly, we should first ask ourselves 
this question : "Why are we here?" 
The most comprehensive answer to 
this, can be stated thus, three fold : 
(1) To gain efficiency. (2) To 
secure some knowledge (3) To form 
strong, noble characters. Now how 
will this institution of "cribbing" 



assist in the attainment of either of 
these ends? As to the first, we are 
safe in saying, that the only efficiency 
we could gain, would be to learn how 
to lie and steal easily and [effectively, 
and of course here our third end is 
defeated. Lasting knowledge, facts 
that would remain with us, could 
certainly not be attained by this 
method and as to the third aim, the 
formation of character, we see at 
once how much at variance the means 
and the end are. 

It has been said by some one that 
the man 01 woman who will cheat in 
college cannot be trusted when he 
leaves college. If this be true, a very 
closer observer would say, that when 
this collegiate generation is out in 
the world, we will see a great many 
more "crooks" than honest men, and 
there can be no such things as trust or 
confidence 

We. who are cluse observers as was 
said before, do not believe that this 
accusation or judgment can be true. 
The true anwser is resolved into one 
word — "thoughtlessness," either 
premeditated or unpremeditated. 
Many of those who indulge have 
really not thought about it and others 
have tried not to and have succeeded. 

Let us ntw look at the question 
fairly and squarely, in the light of 
these few words and in the light of 
the ideals for which we stand, and 
then be true to our own convictions. 
Read again the words which Polonius 
gave to Laerites, his son, quoted at 
the head of this article. 

Conservatory Notes 

We are pleased to welcome the 
following new students to our ranks- 



Miss Sarah Wengert, ^Lebanon; Mis' 
Ruth Hammer, Penbrook ; Mr. Harold 
Landis, Palmyra, and Prof. Irving 
Reist, of Annville Public Schools. 

Miss Gertrude K. Schmidt of the 
Conservatory faculty sang with the 
Hershey Choral Society, on Friday 
evening, Jan. 17th, 1913. Miss 
Velma Heindel. '13, acted as her. 
accompanist. 

Mrs. E. Edwin Sheldon was respon- 
sible for a surprise birthday party 
given for Prof. Sheldon, on Jan. 16th. 

The Conservatory seniors attended 
the Presidents Reception, Jan. 10th. 

Miss Velma Stauffer has returned 
to the ranks of the Ladies' Glee Club. 

Inquiries are coming in concerning 
the two Glee^Clubs and dates are being 
booked for both organizations. An- 
nouncement of them will be given 
later. 



Y. W. C. A. 

Miss Mary Spayd conducted the 
meeting on Sunday, Jan. 19. She' 
gave a most interesting and helpful 
talk on "Forgiven and Being For- 
given", using as her lesson Maithew 
18:21—35. The thought was further 
emphasized by the reading of an ex- 
tract from Dr. Miller's "Art of 
Living. " 

We wish to remind the girls of the 
school thai; the Y. W. C. A. is one of 
the great opportunities of college life 
which none can afford to miss. 



The reason why so few marriages 
are happy is because young ladies, 
spent their time in making nets, not 
in making cages.— Swift 



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COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 
Piano solo, Mae Meyer; A Review 
of Governor Tener's Message, Ruth 
E. Engle; Reading, Helen Brightbill; 
Autobiography, Larene Engle: De- 
bate: Resolved, That in public High 
Schools Secret Societies Should be 
prohibited: Aflirmative, Clara Horn, 
Pauline Byrd. Negative, Blanche 
Risser, Mary Daugherty ; Vocal Sole, 
Velma Heindel; Chorus, Society. 

A Trip to Kentucky 

On last Tuesday evening in the 
college prayer meeting and in chapel 
services on Wednpsday morning, Miss 
Helen Rue, of the Settlement school 
in Knot Co., Kentucky, gave a most 
fascinating and interesting talk on 
the life and characteristics of the 
mountaineers of that section and her 
work among them. 

She related the storv of the found- 
ing of the school by a band of young 
Kentucky blue-giass girls, who had 
come to th 2 mountains to spend a 
part of the summer as pleasure-seek- 
ers. She described the conditions 
which these girls found among the 
people and the troubled consciences 
which followed. Many of the people 
lived in rude log cabins with ground 
floors, low doors and no windows, as 
many as twelve or fifteen in a hut. 
They dressed poorly and cooked 
worse. Many of them spoke a lan- 
guage resembling that of old England. 
Their children married at the ages of 
eleven and twelve and the very low- 
est conditions of life were found in 
this region, so close to our own doors. 

Upon the establishment of the 
school which is supported by the W. 
C. T. U , the D. A. R. and certain 
individual, the people were taught to 



f Select Your Presents at ^ 



t Harnish & Smith's ( 



BOOK STORE f 

Q Everything In the Gift Line, and all at d 
3 Reasonable Prices. c 

$ Parker Fountain Pens, College Jewelry $ 
and Christmas Novelties c 
f at f 

I Harnish & Smith's J 
^ Book Store J 

^-©^© -^s.©-^y© -^y©-^>© -^><!5-^ 



W. D, ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa. 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

jCebanon 7/ alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
ffiev. S. 0. Sosserrd, ^President 
Jtnnviltej tPa. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



E 



DAYTON, O. 



OFFERS 4 COURSES 

1. The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
ing" to the degree of Bachelor of 
Divinity. 

2. The English. 

3. The Missionary. 

4. The Deaconess. 



Prominence given to "Religious pedagogy'' of 
Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap- 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Wok, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Forerigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
ingle students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 

For further information or Catalogue-Bulletin 
Address the President, 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER. W. Main St. 

$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it toda i \ 



THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Or J. E. FOUT 

Business Manager 



J. P. LAN DIS 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

SCHOOL of \\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, IM.Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



build sanitary homes and to cook 
wholesome food and to live in better 
conditions. Mothers, fathers and 
children went to school with each 
other until at present many of the 
people are civilized, and modern im- 
provements have been established. 

The school has a regular course of 
study through the grades and a high 
school. Domestic Science and 
Manual training are among the de- 
partments. The entire school is well 
equipped but at present, is too small 
to meet the needs and demands of 
the community. 

Miss Rue showed pictures of the 
school and the pupils and with these 
and her fascinating story, a strong 
interest in these people was aroused 
among the students and the starting 
doint of charity again brought to our 
minds. 

Y. M. C. A. 

Sunday's meeting was lead by Mr. 
Maurice Leister, '15. He read for 
the lesson Revelations 21, first nine 
paragraphs, and took f"r his subject 
"Progress in tho Christian's Life." 

From the life of Paul the leader 
drew some very good illustrations in 
comparing the life of the Christian of 
to-day with his life. Paul was not 
satisfied to be born into the King- 
dom of Christ, but he wanted his life 
to be a progressive one after having 
entered into this Kingdom. Our lives 
should show a like progressive 
struggle. 

ITEMS OF INTEREST 

Miss Katherine Nissley, of Her- 
shey, spent Sunday afternoon with 
Mrs. Freed. 

Miss Blinn, Ceneral Secretary of 
the Young Women's Missionary Band 
of the Unitid Brethren church, visited 
the school, Friday. She addressed 
the Y. W. C. A. 

Miss Joy Mathias, '16, spent the 
week end at her home in High Spire. 

Mr. McConnell, of Johnstown, a 
•former student, visited here Friday 
and Saturday. 

Mrs. Spayd entertained her Sunday- 
School Class, tha college girls, 
Saturday evening. 

Miss Mary Daughter/, '16 visited 
in Harrisburg, Saturday and Sunday. 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 

Quantity ✓ ✓ ✓ Quality 
Main Street 

D. B. SHIFFER 

Largest Assortment of Post Cards, Tablets 
Envelopes, Pens, Inks, Mucilage, 
Toys, Etc. 

Near Post Office ANNVILLE 

"The 
Leader" 



THATS 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING L BROS, 

26-130 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YOR^ 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 

Main Street Annville, Pa. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffc Shoes 



MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddicl< 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 

H. F\ LONG & SON 
Hear Kagle Hotel A.nn\-ille, F»a 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 



RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's"' 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. 8. MIL LER W. MAIN ST. 

A RULE 

"Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardeen, 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers! 
Agencies cither has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." • 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
ergj of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good natu redly as heretofore; for we finq 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperi-nced in securing positions. 

Every year since 19(15 we have been in need of 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school work. 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

F. L, MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co- 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COLLEGE JVcWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume | V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, January 28, 1913 



No. lO 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Basket Ball 

On Saturday evening the basket 
ball team played the Muhlenburg 
College team at Allentown. Our boys 
were defeated by the score of 35 to 20. 
Although defeated, the team played a 
good game and at times were danger- 
ous. Good passing was lacking at 
time?, however, but this should be 
overcome by the practice being done 
this week. Strickler at forward 
played a star game, while the guard- 
ing of Schmidt and Snavely was of 
the very best. Miller at center out 
jumped his opponent throughout the 
game. The line-up. 

!*• V. C. Muhlenburg 
Strickler 
Dearolf 
Miller 
Schmidt 

Snavely g Leisey, Copley 

Goals -Strickler 6, Dearolf, Miller; 
Hubbard 5, Afflebach 4, Vreeland 2, 
Copley, Ritter 2. Fouls— Strickler 4; 
Hubbard 7. Referee, Mueller; Time 
keeper, Ritchie, L, Y. C. ; Time of 
halves, 20 minutes. 



Afflebach 
Hubbard 
Ritter 
Vreeland 



Student's Council at Easton, Pa. 

During February first, second and 
third there will meet at Easton, a 
Student's Council of the Young 
Women's Christian Association. The 
council is called for the purpose of 
bringing unity into tne work of the 
*• W. C. A., and also to consider 
better and more effective methods for 
the carrying on of the work. It is ex- 
pected and hoped that a great in- 
spirational value will be a part of the 
meetings and that the girls at the 
conference will carry some of this 
Aspiration and enthusiasm back to 
their own college associations. Miss 
Clara Horn, '13, and Miss Mary A. 
Spayd, '15, have been elected as the 
official delegates of our own Y. W. C. 
A. Other members of the Associa- 



tion may have the privilege of attend- 
ing at their own expense, if they de^ 
sire to do so. Such should report to 
the President or Secretary. 

Annville' s Evangelistic Cam- 
paign 

The churches of Annvil'e will unite 
for a two week's Evangelistic cam- 
paign to be held in the month of 
March. The meetings are to be held 
in our own College Chapel and they 
will be conducted by Rev. W. J. 
Nicholson, a former Presbyterian 
minister of Glasgow, Scotland. He 
is spoken of as a fine preacher and 
an excellent leader. He will be as- 
sisted by Mr. Raymond Hemminger 
of Carlisle, Pa., who will lead the 
singing and a choir of 100 voices, and 
also Mr. Johnson, a particularly 
gifted pianist who was discovered by 
Mr. Hemminger in Australia. This 
fine trio of workers are expected to do 
much for Annville and the community. 

In preparation for this crusade the 
pastors of the town are working zeal- 
ously. On Sunday afternoon the first 
preparatory union service was held in 
the U. ^B. church. Rev. Hynson, of 
Lebanon spoke to the assembly. On 
Sunday, Feb. 19, another meeting will 
be held in the Reformed Church. 
The second choir practice will be held 
in the Lutheran church on Friday 
evening. Students of the college are 
desired and invited to join the choir. 

Y. W. C. A. 

Miss Sara Zimmerman conduced 
the meeting Sunday afternoon. She 
chose the practical subject "cheer- 
fulness." The opportunities of collge 
girls as compared with otheis were dis- 
cussed, the Lader showing that for 
this reason alone, the former should 
be very happy. Thinking of the 
past, was given as chief cause of dis- 
content, for which the best remedy is 
work and helpfulness toward others. 



Calendar 

Wednesday, 29th, 8 p. m.— Star 
Course, Dr. Colledge. 

Friday, 31th, 7 :15-Literary So- 
cieties. 

Sunday, Feb. 2, land 1 :30— Asso- 
ciation meetings. 

Tuesday, Feb. 7, 6 p. m.— Prayer 
meeting. 



"As You Like It" 

The v . W. and Y. M. C. A's will 
present "As You Like It" during 
commencement Week. At this time 
only tha leading characters have been 
chosen but the entire cast will be 
published in the near future. 

It was desired that the public 
should know that the present stage 
fixings were purchased with the pro- 
ceeds from the Dramatic Recital given 
last spring by the Oratory Depart- 
ment, also with the gift of ten dollars 
from tha Girls Glee Club of last year. 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Insti- 
tute 

The Class of '87 of The Rensselaer 
Polytechnic Institute, Troy, N. Y., 
has presented it with a new gym- 
nasium at a cost of $150,000. The 
gymnasium has been built and. is now 
in use. It contains a swimming pool 
30 feet in size, bowling alleys, rooms 
for inside baseball, basketball, hand- 
ball, boxing, wrestling, a squash 
court and the main gymnasium for- 
general atheltic exercise. The build- 
ing is equipped throughout with the? 
most approved modern apparatus... 
It is built of Harvard brick with 
limestone trimmings and is fire proof 
throughout. 



You can't learn to walk if you? 
haven't tumbled down a good deal in. 
doing it. It is often failure that, 
means ultimate success. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fiecus 

Issued weekly during - the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MTJLHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 
CLARA HORN, '13 
Athletics 

IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

Assistants 
HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to ; all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building- Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 

Editorial 

The farmer who works sci-n- 
tifically, prepares the soil for what is 
to be placed in it, when intending to 
S3W wheat or oats, plows the 
ground, pulverizes it, and then scatters 
the seed according to well understood 
methods of procedure. He joins his 
strength and wisdom to the living 
forces of nature and in due time takes 
'the advantage of the natural 
^multiplication to increase the results 
.of his labors. 

Preparation of a similar nature is 
very essential in college work. It is 
needful to prepare and sow seed be- 
fore any harvest can be expected. 
There are some who, in their unwisdom 
try to gather a harvest without this 
preparatory work. That is a sort of 
flaziness and mental misunderstanding 
of the plan in the pursuit of getting 
knowledge, neither one of which is 
productive of good results In every 
contest where physical strength is 
required very much training and care is 
necessary to develop endurance and 
•poise in action Why should net tho 
same daily taining be necessary for 
•the mental contest which comes twice 
a year in college. If this daily pre- 



paration was kept in mind we, as a 
result, would have no contest. It 
would be a "walk over." Because 
tnia important feature of college 
education is neglected, the'result end3 
in a contest that is very dramatic. 
This is caused by what we commonly 
call cramming and the result is often 
humorous and ridiculous. It is not 
word splitting but compiling words in 
order to fill up space and also to em- 
ploy the alloted time. The answer 
given to the simple addition of two 
and two will explain what is meant 
by compiling words. The solution 
was the following : "If by that par- 
ticular arithmetia! rule known as 
addition, we desire to arrive at the 
sum of two integers" we would find 
—I say it boldly, is, and without 
fear of successful contra-election— we 
I repeat should find by the particular 
arithmetial formula before mentioned 
and sir I hold myself perfectly res- 
ponsible for the fs;ertion I am about 
to make— that the sum of the two 
given integers added to the other two 
integers would be four." 

In this solution the correct result 
was reached in the end, but where 
the question is more complex often 
the answer is not successfully ob- 
tained and the result is disastrous. 
Why not prepare day by day and 
avoid such ignominious defeat. 



Conservatory Notes 

Miss Edith A. Gnirgich, '11, is 
spending the week in Philadelphia 
with friends and relatives. 

Mis3 Ora Bachman, '11 spent the 
week-end with Mis3 Mary Nissley in 
Middletown, Pa. 



Miss Dora Ryland, '15 has been 
confined to her room the past week 
with a severe attack of La Grippe. 

Miss Myrle Behney, '13 was not 
seen about the Conservatoiy on 
Friday, the day being given her to join 
in tlie occasion of rejoicing over the 
return of her brother who has been 
the victim of a very severe case of 
typhoid fever. Mr. Behney entered 
Lafayette College but was soon taken 
to the hospital at Easton, retraining 
there from Sept., until the pre&ent 
time. 

Keep in mind certain dates such 
as— Feb. 11 Recital by Junior Class, 
Conservatory. Feb. 18 Recital by 
Department of Oratory. 

Miss Gertrude K. Schmidt enter- 
tained the Ladies' Glee Club in the 
parlors of the Ladies' Hall Saturday 
afternoon. 

The Men's Glee Club are scheduled 
to make their first appearance in 
Hummelstown, Feb. 8th. Feb. 21 is 
given to Lykens and the following 
night they will sing in Elizabethville, 
the home of one of the club members, 
Mr. G. Fred Botts. 



Y. M. C. A. 



The meeting Sunday was not a large 
one. Many of the students were away 
from college over Saturday and Sun- 
day. In the absence of the appointed 
leader the president took charge of 
the meeting. 



Few men can handle a red hot lamp 
chimney and at the same time say 
"There's no place like home without 
getting confused." 



SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 



Enclosed please find One Dollar for College News subscrip- 
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Citv ■ 



State 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 

CLIONIAN 

Vccal solo, Edith Gingrich; Going 
Through Ellis Island, Belle Orris; 
Reading, Edith Lehman; The Social- 
ization of the College, Ethel Houser; 
The End of the Big Job, Esther Heint- 
zleman ; Piano sclo, Mary Spayd ; 
The Great Mississippi Dam, Viola 
G 'uber; Olive Branch, Editor. 
KALOZETEAN 

Current Events, Oakes; Paper, 
Landis; Vocal solo, Von Bereghy ; 
Paper, Strickler; Debate: Resolved, 
That Student Government at L. V. C. 
is Successful. Affirmative, Arndt, 
Mutch. Negative, Schmidt, Young; 
Chorus, Society. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Correspondence, Raymond Arndt; 
The Wonders of the United States, 
John W. Lerew ; Debate: Resolved, 
That, there should be More Formality 
at the Social Functions at Lebanon 
Valley College. Affirmative, Clayton 
Zuse, Alvin Weaver. Negative, Paul 
Witmeyer, Philo Statton ; Violin duet, 
Maurice Leister, Lehman Leister; The 
latest in Finance, Albert G. Shaud ; 
Where to go, Landis R. Klinger. 

•Riches, Genius, Power— all are 
fair things; jet Riches is never 
satisfied, Power is ever upon the 
wing, and when was Geniu3 ever 
happy? But as for this divine gift of 
Simpleness of Heart, who shall say it 
is not the best of all?" 

Thieves can't get your money if 
ycu spend it fast enough. 

A great many more men would go 
to church if there was a law against 
it. 

"Home"— the place to which the 
bills are ^ent. 

The newly married pair had escaped 
from their demonstrative friends and 
were on the way to the depot when 
the carriage stopped. The bridegroom 
looked out of the window impatiently. 

"What's the matter, driver?" he 
called. 

''The horse thrown a shoe, sir," 
Was the reply. 

"Great Scott!" groaned the bride- 
groom; "even the horse knows we're 
.lust married. "—Ex. 



You get only the 


best at 


GOLLAM'S 


Quantity ✓ ✓ ✓ 


Quality 


Main Street 





D. B. SHIFFER 



Largest Assor;ment of Post Cards, Tablets 
Envelopes, Pens, Inks, Mucilage, 
Toys, Etc. 

Near Post Office ANNVILLE 

"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment, 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G, SPALDING L BROS. 

26-130 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YOR^ 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 

Main Street Annville, Pa. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS 5 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 



MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 



LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

F»artiea ei Specialty 
H. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, Pa 



WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON. PA. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A, S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

A EULE 

"Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardeen> 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
ergy of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we rind 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing positions. 

Every year since 1905 we have been in need of 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school work 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co- 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta- 



COLLEGE NEWS 





Items of Interest 



'JS 



Miss Lottie M. Spessard, '13 spent 
the end of Examination week with 
relatives in Hagerstown, Md. 

Mr. Paul J. Bowman spent the 
week-end at his home in Middletown. 

Rev. Joseph Daugherty, of 
Columbia 'visited his daugher, Mary 
at school last week. 

Miss Wareheim, formerly of Dr. 
Gossard's church in Balitmore has 
been enrolled as a new student. Miss 
Wareheim will do some work in the 
library, cataloguing and arranging 
the books. 

Several couples were seen taking 
advantage of the fine weather on 
Sunday. 

Don't forget the Star Course. 

Miss Johnson went to New York, 
Friday, to meet her sister, who is 
returning from a trip abroad. 

Miss Seitzer spent the week end in 
Baltimore and Washington. 

Mrs. Sheldon, Miss Adams and Miss 
Schmidt, were am^ng those entertain- 
ed at the home of Mrs. M. E. Bright- 
bill, Friday afternoon. 

Mr?. Freed spent Saturday after- 
noon at Hershey. 

Edna E. Yarkers was the guest of 
Miss Ruih Detweiler, of Palmyra, 
Saturday and Sunday. 

Ihe Astronomy class surprised Pro- 
fessor Lehman by bringing a lunch 
along to the examination. The 
"feed" menu was oysters sandwiches, 
wafers and peanut butter, olives, 
oranges and chocolate mints. 



I 



Have You Heard the New 

Alma Mater J 

Music by I. F. Loos, '02 
Words by S. R. Oldham, »02 

HARRY H. CHARLTON 

AGENT 

One cent postpaid on receipt of 25c. 



W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty, 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Washington Hotel Ve , vet Ice Cream 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 



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A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

jCebanon 2/allei/ 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 
+ . Special Facilities in Chemistty 
and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
ttev. S. *D. Sossarct, ^President 

BONEBRHKE THEOLOGICAL 



DAYTON, O. 



OFFERS 4 COURSES 

1. The Regular, the equivalent of 
theological courses generally lead- 
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2. The English. 

3. The Missionary. 

4. The Deaconess. 

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Sunday School Science and "Sociology and Ap" 
plied Christianity." Opportunity for Personal 
Wok, Shop - Meetings, Teaching Among the 
Forerigners. 

Expenses Low— no tuition, no room rent for 
ingle students. Advantage of proximity to the 
Denomination Headquarters. 

For further information or Catalogue-Bulletin 
Address the President, 



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A. S. MILLER. W. Main St 



$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as neAV with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the- 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 



THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 
Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

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reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



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Or J. E. FOUT 

Business Manager 



%, SCHOOL of V\ 
ENGINEERING 

j. p. landis Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



COLLEGE 




prof $ 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V. 



flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, February 1913 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., un^er the act of March 3, 1879. 



Senior Class Party 

On Thursday evening, January 30, 
the Senior giris of the doimitory most 
delightfully entertained the rest of 
their class. Mrs. Freed was also 
present as a guest of the hostesses. 
The evening was spent in playing 
games and "doing stunts" of various 
kinds. 

When the members of the class had 
arrived each guest was given the end 
of a string to unwind. When the other 
eni was reached, a slip of paper en- 
closed in two peanut shells greeted the 
puzzled hunters. These papers gave the 
clue to various stunts to be performed 
by the guests, the rendition of which 
caused an abundance of smiles and 
laughter. Another feature of the 
eveninig was the exchange of "gifts, " 
which each member had been asked to 
bring. Many of these were pretty, 
useful "or funny. Guessing contests 
of different kinds and poetry writing 
added spice to the entertainment. in 
the latter, the souls of several undis- 
covered geniuses were revealed 
among the members of the already 
illustrious '13.. Apropriate prizes 
were given. Delicious refreshments 
were then served and the party broke 
up with songs, yells and happy good- 
nights. 



Lebanon Valley Loses to 
Chester 

The Pennsylvania Military College 
quintette defeated our basket ball team 
by the small score of 25-19. The 
Chester boys had the advantage of a 
better team, trained well and also the 
advantage of a good floor for hard 
practice. They played a rough game 
tni our boys played a very good game 
considering the fact that they have 
poor chances for good practice. Cocco 
played a brilliant game for P. M. C, 
shooting several d fficult field goals. 
Campbell and Frick played good flocr 



work. Dearolf and Strickler excelled 
in our team. 

P. M. C. Positions L. V. C. 
Cocco forward Strickler 

Brodskj forward Dearolf 

Thompfordt center Miller 
Campbell guard Snavely 

Frick guard Schmidt 

Field goals, Cocco 6; Brodsky, 2: 
Strickler; Dearolf, 4; Goals from 
fouls, Campbell 5; Strickler 4; Ref- 
eree, Griffin; Score-keeper, Johnson. 
Time of halves 20 minutes. Score 
25 to 18. 



Star Course 

The third rumber of the course 
was a lecture given by Dr. William 
A. Colledge. He introduced his sub- 
ject by telling the story of an old 
fiddle and then he drew the compar- 
ison that "fiddles are representative 
types of men and women, some first 
and others second fiddlers." The 
general thought of the lecture seemed 
to be: wake up to your opportunities. 
Low birth or environment forms no 
bar to your future success if you have 
that "iron will," which as Dr. 
Colledge said "will achieve anything 
in life. The "iron will" is self- 
reliance and will power. The 
difference between a weak and strong 
man is simply energy. 

Imitation is a sign of weakness. 
The common idea of "cranks" is that 
they are fanatics in only certain lines 
but they are really men or women 
who have original ideas and we see 
their results of these "cranky" ideas 
in many of our great inventions. 
Dr. Colledge definition of a crank was, 
"a crank is a specialist in something 
that you take no interest in " Study 
yourself instead of others to avoid im- 
itation. 

One of the principles qualities in 
masterly workmanship is to finish 
what you begin. Faithfulness along 
any line is the duty required of us. 



We cannot all be great and the age 
wants "Souls" v,ho are willing to 
throw themselves into ordinary chan- 
nels to accomplish the lower things. 
Many of us have worked hard and have 
developed our powers but we have not 
done our best. "Servant, what are 
you doing with your talent?" 



Calendar 



Tuesday, 6 p. m. —Prayer meeting. 
Friday, 7 p. m. — Literary So- 
cieties. 

Sunday, 1 p. m.—Y. M. and Y. 
W. C. A. 

Monday, 7:30 p. m.— Lecture by 
Hon. Henry Houck. 



The Educational Meeting of 
Farmers Institute 

The Farmers Institute of Lebanon 
County was held in the college 
chapel, Monday and Tuesday of last 
week. Dr. Weber, State College 
and*R. P. Kester were the speakers in 
the Eductaional program, Tuesday 
evening. Dr. Weber spoke on the 
centralized Public School, lie urged 
the establishment of these centralized 
schools in the country districts, for 
better teachers can be obtained and a 
higher salary offered; industrial train- 
ing and domestic science can be 
taught; it forms a link to higher 
schools. "Education is not complete 
until a smooth easy path is formed 
from elementary courses to the uni- 
versity," Horace Mann. Mr. Kester's 
subject was the " Education We Need" 
—He said that the country school is 
not a success because a wrong atmoa- 
phere is created by the text books, 
which do not contain much of agricuL 
ture or the beauties of nature; too 
many branches offered; education only 
of books. Mr. Kester urged that in 
the rural districts "the hand should 
be taught to do. " 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fleuis 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKEBS, '13 
ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 

CLARA HORN, '13 

A thletics 

IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

■ Assistants 
HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Subscription Price SI. 00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

It has for some time been the cry 
about Lebanon Valley that her social 
advantages are not adequate and that 
a greater social training is needed for 
the students here. Others would say 
thai" this is unnecessary, superficial 
and not fundamental. Let us lock at 
the question for a moment. 

If so-called social training involves 
a preparation for association among 
the "smart set" or the "400," Leb- 
anon Valley is well-off without it. If 
however, it is society life in the 
highest sense, at which our training 
should aim, then we are sadly lacking. 
If by this term we mean the "adjust- 
ment of man to man, socially, so that 



the world may grow better, more 
generous and more truly sympathetic 
in their lelations with each other," 
then we should ceitainly bestir our- 
selves. Probably to a certain extent 
our students receive this training in 
the class-rooms, in the Christian 
Associations and in the Literary So- 
cieties."" Certainly this is true to son e 
extent. Yet we believe that a great- 
er emphasis should be laid, even on 
the more supeificial side. Courtesy in 
actions and daily relations, the polite- 
ness of culture and refinement, the 
outward forms of gentility in cur 
associations and conversations. All 
these are certainly not amiss. They 
are absolutely necessary when a 
college gracuate is trying to maintain 
the dignity of a position, so why 
should we not try to practise them 
here in college? Etiquette is based 
on true culture and real worth, and is 
not to be scorned because it is super- 
ficial. The extreme polish of a 
"dude" or a "finished" lady is cer- 
tainly to be avoided, but that court- ' 
esy which comes from a true consider- 
ation and sympathy for the feelings 
of others is certainly to be cultivated 
by everyone. 

What new agencies we could es- 
tablish to improve these conditiens, 
we would not suggest. But why not 
use those we already have? We have 
noticed that our college audiences are 
often conspicuously discourteous. 
Whispering, laughing and moving 
about at our various entertainments 
ha3 been annoying to many. Other 
breaches cf ordinary poilteness are 
alleged to exist here. Are we 
guilty? Let us do our part to uphold 
or even raise higher the standards of 
social Mfe at Lebanon Valley. It will 
pay. 



Mathematical Round Table 

The Mathematical Round Table had 
a very interesting meeting on Mon- 
day evening. Though the attendance 
was not up to average, the program 
was good. Miss Mentz read a paper 
on "Modern Methods in Math- 
ematics," which was most instruc- 
tive. Miss Lehman read a brief 
history of Analytical Geometry. Mr. 
Williams very ably discussed the 
subject, "Modern Mathematics, its 
scope and tendencies." The follow- 
ing officers were elected at Business 
session: President, Mr. Williams; 
Vice President, Miss Horn; Secretary, 
MissRechard; Treasurer, Mr. Bow- 
man. The next meeting will be the 
Anniversary nf the Round lable and 
will be celebrated by some special 
program. 

Joint Session 

A very splendid meeting was held 
on Sunday afternoon in the Y. M. 
C. A. hall, in joint session with the 
Y. W. C. A. and the Y. M. C. A. 
Mr. Leininger, Pres., led the meeting 
and very ably spoke on the call to 
Missions in China. He read a letter 
from Dr. Hough in Africa; this letter 
described some of our work in Sierra 
Leone and very vividly brought to cur 
minds the needs of the dark continent, 
tne "open sore of the world." The 
singing was led by Dr. Lehman. 
Several of the Y. W. C. A. workers 
spoke on the subject, also. A special 
plea was made for the Mission Classes 
which are studying Arthur J. Brown's 
"The Chinese Revolution." 

Mr. Alvin Weaver, '15, manager 
of the Boy's Glee Club has arranged 
a tour in Western Pennsylvania for 
March. The trip will probably in- 
clude six or seven concerts. 



SENIORS! 

Get your recommendations mutigraphed for your agencies and applications, by the 

COLLEGE BOOK STORE 



The neatness of your letter of recommendation will get you the better position. It will also speak 

a good word for you — Price is right too. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



PHILOKOSMIAN 

Resume, David Bashore ; Choosing a 
President in France, Robert Hartz; 
Debate: Resolved, That cooperation 
is the Most Satisfactory Solution of 
Labor Problems. Affirmative, Carl 
Snavely, Ellis Zimmerman. Nega- 
tive, D. L. Reddick, R. M. Weidler; 
Vocal solo, C. G. Snavely; The Penn- 
sylvania Legislature, Ralph SticKel ; 
Impromptu, P. F. Roberts; Living 
Thoughts, Editor. Visitors welcome. 
CLIONIAN 

Roll Call, Lincoln Quotations; Round 
Table, Facts concerning the Life of 
Lincoln, Elizabeth Rechard; Piano 
solo, Blanche Black; St. Valentine 
Tradition, Helen Brightbill; Piano 
solo, Ruth Quigley; Lincoln as a 
Literary Man, Florence Christeson; 
Presidential Conventions 1860-64, 
Florence Clippinger ; Matching Through 
Georgia, Society. 

KALOZETEAN 

Current Events, John Lung; Select- 
ed Reading, Elmer Kirkpatrick; 
Quartette, Thomas B. Lyter, Carl F. 
Schmidt, Paul L. Strick'er, Marcel 
Vcn Bereghy ; Selected Reading, John 
Oakes; Paper, Frank Van Schaak. 



Items of Interest 



Miss Lottie Spessard, '13, manager 
of the Girl's Glee Club has arranged a 
tour for the Girl's Club for the end of 
the Easter vacation. This trip in- 
cludes five dates in the Cumberland 
Vailey. 

Miss Josephine Urich, '14, was 
visiting in Harrisburg, on Saturday. 

The A. B. Club of the school had a 
''feed" at the home of Florence 
Chr isteson, on Saturday evening. 

Mr. John K. Lehman, '11, of U. of 
P spent the latter part of his exam, 
week in Annville. 



YOUR NAME CARD 

Will best represent you if you 
get it engraved. Make your select- 
ions of the latest Types and give 
your orders to HARNISH & SMITH. 



Mr. Sam Groh, Ex-'15, spent Fri- 
day at college. 

Edna E. Yarkers, '13, visited at the 
home of Miss Mary B. Musser, '10, 
Mountville, Saturday and Sunday. 

Miss Schmidt, Conservatory Fac- 
ulty, spent a day in New York City. 

W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 



A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



^Cebanon 2/ a I ley 
College 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System, 

Special Facilities i?i Chemist? y 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
ttev. S. 0. Sossarcf, SPrest'cten/ 
jfnnvitie, SPa. 

Have You Heard the New 

Alma Mater 1 



Music by I. F. Loos, '02 
| Words by S. R. Oldham, "02 J 

HARRY H. CHARLTON 

AGENT 



One seat postpaid on receipt of 25c. 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



USSY'S 



A. S. MILLER. W. Main St. 



$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
"as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2-50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of V\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Y. W C. A. Council atEaston 

The Student's Council of the Y. W. 
C. A. of Pennsylvania was held in the 
Association Rooms at Easton. There 
were probably seven or eight schools 
represented, only two of which were 
colleges. Miss Richardson, sectional 
student secretary had charge of most 
of the meetings. She gave adress°-s 
of a devotional and inspirational 
nature. Several [of her talks, how- 
ever were more practical. She dis- 
cussed the work of the Y. W. C. A., 
this year, its nr. e -hods, its publications 
and its finances. Miss Burner con- 
ducted the Bible study. In her talks, 
she explained various passages of the 
Bible and gave instructions concern- 
ing "Methods of Bible Study Clas- 
ses." Miss Hopins gave several 
blackboard talks, in which she 
illustrated the relations between the 
several departments of the entire 
Association. She also outlined and 
described the various types of stu- 
dents to be found among colleges and 
suggested methods for working with 
these types. A special feature of the 
convention was the demonstration by 
'the "Camp Fire Girls." The council 
c'osed on Sunday evening. Miss Horn 
'13 and Miss Spayd '15 were our 
delegates. 



Lecture 

On Monday evtning, February 10, 
the Hon. Henry Houck, of Lebanon, 
will deliver his lecture "Travels in 
the Orient" in the chapel, for the 
benefit of the Golden Rule Bible Ciass 
of the U. B. church. Mr. Houck is 
well known in Lebanon county as an 
eloquent orator. He is also noted for 
the frequency of his jokes and the fiie 
of his wit. He is known and respect- 
ed alike by schoc -boy, business man, 
teacher, political boss and private 
citizen. This lecture is the result of 
wide travels and has been spoken of 
as interesting and entertaining. Let 
all the students partake of this op- 
portunity. Admission 25c. 



STFOENTS! 

All your demands for pennants, 
letter paper, nifty post cards and 
college supplies, can be met by the 
COLLEGE BOOK STORE — Drop in and 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 



Quantity * ' ' Quality 
Main Street 



D. B. SHIFFER 

Largest Asseriment of Pest Cards, Tablets 
Envelopes, Pens, Inks, Mucilage, 
Toys, Etc, 

Near Post Office ANNVILLE 



"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment, 
Catalogue Free, 

A. G. SPALDING & BROS, 

26430 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YOR* 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Roddick 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams tr 
Hire 
Parties a Specialty 
I I. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, Pa 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shavim 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO' 
LATES. ALWAYS FFESH 

W, Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. 8. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

|£ Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON. PA. 



Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. 8. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



A RULE 

"Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardee 
"that the teacher who rails against Teacne 
Agencies either has been refused admission 
membership or has tried to evade the paym 
of a just debt." ]]{ , 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, » ueJ " 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, > 
have found others-the applicants who aom 
know how to utilize the services of an Age™-> 
and who resent suggestions. , 

We devote about one-fourth the time ana e» 
ergj of our organization to preparing these w 
pllcants and lose annually hundreds of va.oaiJ^ 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our wi» 
along this line will be continued as nopei » j 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for v> e » t 
that most of our good, strong applicants were 
one time inexperienced in securing positions. flf 

Every vear since 1905 we have been ^ ."vT^ar. 
more applicants to fill the best positions in 
ly every grade of public and private school w« • 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

F, L, MYEPS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, P a ^ 
operating agencies in Denver and A<' a<1 



COLLEGE 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 




Volume :V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, February 11, 1913 



No. 12 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3. 1879. 



Lebanon Valley Wins 

On Saturday night, February eighth 
Lebanon Valley defeated the strong 
Lebanon Y. M. C. A. basket ball 
team, on the Lebanon Y. M. C. A. 
floor by a score of 35 to 17. It was 
the first chance our student? had to 
see their team in action and many 
availed themselves of that privilege. 
Baring roughness, the game was fast 
and interesting and showed that the 
boys of the white and blue can play 
basket ball as well as foot ball. 
Many times the game appeared like 
an indoor foot ball game. The Y. M. 
C. A. boys forgot that the members 
of our team are [foot ball players and 
when they started to use rough tactics 
our boys came back strong, 

Lebanon Valley took the lead from 
the very start and maintained it 
throughout the game. The first half 
ended 19 to 8 favor L. V. 

For Lebanon Valley Strickler was 
tha star having caged 10 goals. 
Miller and Snavely excelled in defen- 
sive work. For Y. M, C. A. Whitman 
and Kirkwood excelled. The score: 
L. V. LEBANON Y. M. C. A. 

F. Whitman 

F. Gingrich 
C Light 

G, Kirkwood 
G. Bell 

Field goals— Strickler 10, Dearolf, 
Miller 2, Schmidt 2; Whitman 2, 
Light 2, Kirkwood 2, Gingrich. Foul 
goals Strickler 5, Whitman 1, Kirk- 
wood 2. Time of ^halves 20 minutes. 
Referee Miller, Timekeeper, Martin, 
Scorer Marks. 

The next opportunity to see Lebanon 
Valley play will be February 21 when 
they meet the strong Susquehanna 
University team. This is one of 
Lebanon Valley's real home games 
and should have the patronage of every 
student and friend of the college. 
Don't forget the date, Friday, Feb- 
ruary 21. 



Dearolf 
Miller 
Snavely 
Schmidt 



Lecture 

Monday evening Hon. Henry 
Houck, of Lebanon, delivered a splen- 
did lecture on "My Travels in 
Orient." A great duty and privilege 
of man is to spread gladr.e3s where 
ever he goes and Mr. Houch said that 
be found this to be true in many of 
the foreign lands. The vessel left 
New York March Sth and their first 
stop was on one of the beautiful 
islands lying off the coast of Portu- 
gal. From there they went to Gib- 
raltar, whose immense rock is 1450 
feet high and honey combed with 
arsenals with ammunition for seven 
years. Athens, the "white city" 
was next visited. One of the most 
impressive things to Dr. Houck was 
their worship on Mars Hill, Sunday. 
The things of interest in Cairo were 
the Museum, pyramids and the Uni- 
versity of Cairo with a student body 
of ten thousand. Jerusalem, the 
Holy City, was to Dr. Houck the most 



unattractive city in all the trip. The 
streets are very narrow and filthy, 
the boarding is very unsatisfactory 
The impressive scenes in Jerusalem 
are the Mount of Olives, the Garden 
of Gethsemane and the Wailing Place 
of the Jews. The latter is the place 
where the Jews think the temple was 
situated. Jeticho, Dead Sea and the 
River Jordan were also visited. The 
"'Stars and Strips" floating in New 
York Harbor wa3 the most beautiful 
sight to Dr. Houck on his return. 

This lecture was given for the 
benefit of the Golden Rule Bible 
Class of the U. B. Church, of which 
Dr. Lehman is the kader. 



Calendar 

Wednesday, Feb. 12th. 17 p. m. - 
Biological Field Club. 

Friday, Feb. 14th. 8 p.. m.— Mas- 
querade Party ; 

Saturday, Feb. 15th. 8 p. m.— Star 
Course. 

Sunday, Feb. 16th. 1 o'lock-Y. M. 
C. A. ; 1:30 Y. W. C. A. 



of 

Spbanon Batten, (United 
uqm&tz % tytmar of gmtr ptmme at a 
JHagqitmA* Party 
ta to? nunm in %tr Jjathi 
mt Jffrftan Smmtnn, ifohruarg % fomtun% 
nxmUm Ijuttbrro ana t^trtwn 
at riglft a doth. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fleuas 



Issued weekly during 1 the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 

CLARA HORN, '13 

Athletics 

IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
Assistants 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Subscription Price Si. 00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
CI nbs of ten , 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

If you conisder yourself a "knock- 
er," read this. If you do not admit 
that honor to be yours, then by all 
means, lay this aside now. But 
because we believe, we know there are 
such here, we shall dare to give this 
advice which follows. 

Did you ever say anything about 
someone behind that someone's back, 
which you would not say to his face? 
Think honestly for one minute ! Did 
you ever "knock?" Whether you have 
indulged or not (and of course you have 
not), you have condemned the practise 
time after time. And rightly so. 
Surely no one is helped through it, 
neither '"knocker" nor "knocked". 



It is indeed a very good rule, never to 
destruct unless you mean to construct 
through it, and surely "knocking" is 
not the prescription to use. 

All fault finding should^be directed 
toward the correction of the trouble. 
Then direct your fault finding to the 
cause and source of the difficulty and 
not to everyone else under the sun. 
If you are dissatisfied with certain 
conditions, speak to the right person 
about it. If you don't like your room 
or your board, tell the treasurer. 
That is more sensible. If you don't 
like the way an organization is run, 
tell the President. He'll do it differ- 
ently, just to suit you. If you don't 
like your teacher, tell him. He'll 
thank you. If you don't like your 
grades, 'tell the Registrar. May be he'll 
change them. If you are displeased 
with your friend, tell him. It's 
sfer. If you wish to'criticise this 
paper, come to us. We II listen to you. 

If you don't like this article, tell 
the editors. They'll give you a chance. 
If you don't like L. V., go home and 
work, if that is the only way you can 
be at ease. Don't knock. One open, 
frank blow is more effective than hun- 
dreds of underhand hits. This is 
meant for me and you. 

Y. W. C. A. 

Misses Clara Horn and Mary Spayd 
had charge of the meeting on Sunday 
afternoon. After reading the twelfth 
chapter of Komans as the Scripture 
lesson, they gave reports of the 
sectional Student Council held at 
Easton, Jan. ?0-Feb. 2. The leaders 
of the council were Miss Oolooah 
Burner, secretary of Student Depart- 
ment of the National Board, Mi?s 
Mary Johns Hopper, executive sec- 
retary of the Del., Md. and Penna. 



Field committee and Miss Eleano r 
Richardson, student secretary of Del., 
Md. , and Penna. Field Committee. 

The delegates gave very interesting 
reports carrying a breach of the in- 
spiration of the conference to the Y. 
W. C. A. girls. 

Miss Richardson expressed the key- 
note, of the college girl's life well 
when she said "Because we are in- 
formed we shall inform; informing we 
shall reform and lives will be trans- 
formed. ' ' 

Miss Burner's Bible study periods 
were excellent. She asked the girls to 
pray "Help us to see what thou hast, 
revealed" rather than "Lord, reveal 
thyself to us. 

In a series of blackboard talks, Miss 
Hooper emhes sed the fact that the 
Y. W. C. A. was to develope a girl 
not only along religious lines, but in 
every way. A girl needs intellectual, 
social and physical development as 
well as religious. 

All the Y. W. C. A. girls will 
have the pleasure of meeting Miss 
Richardson for she will be at Leb- 
anon Valley over the 19th and 20th of 
this month. 

Week of Prayer 

A well rounded man or woman mu=t 
have the three sides of his life fully 
developed, mental, moral and phys- 
ical. Although we live a reilgious 
life each day now the opportunity is 
offered to add to this side of our life. 
This privilege is given by the week 
of Prayer 

The leaders are the following: 
Monday,' Rev. Harry Miller; Tuesday, 
Dr. Gossard; Wednesday, Rev. Wit- 
man; Thuisday, Rev. B. F. Daugh- 
erty;Friday, Professor Shenk, meet- 
ing frcm 6 to 7 in Library. Special 
class prayer meetings from 5:45 to 6. 



SENIORS! 

Get your recommendations mutigraphed for your agencies and applications, by the 

COLLEGE BOOK! STORE 



The neatness of your letter of recommendation will get you the better position. It will also speak 

a good word for you — Price is right too. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



SOPHRONEAN 
Reading, Anna Dubble; Quartette, 
Messrs. Brubaker, Hallman, Albright, 
McClure; Original Story, Allen 
Engle; Debate: Resolved, That 
Bicycle Riding is more Healthful 
than Walking, Affirmative, Harold 
Wrightstone, H. E. Schaeffer. 
Negative, Raymond Arndt, Harold 
Wine; Piano Solo, Mabel Snyder; 
What's the Use, Robert McClure; 
Clarinet solo, A. D. Medsger; Live 
Wire, Editor. 



Alumni 

'12. Mr. Clair F. Harnish spent 
Saturday and Sunday in Annville. 

'12. Mr. Oliver Butterwick spent 
some time at school last week. 

'12. Mr. J. F. Reed attended the 
game on Saturday evening. 

'12. Miss Helen L. Weidler at- 
tended part of the Y. W. C. A. Con- 
ference at Easton. 

'10. Miss Mary Musser entertain- 
ed Miss Yarkers at her home in 
Mountville, last week. 

'11. Miss Elizabeth Lau'a pupils 
in the Red Lion High School tendered 
her a surprise birthday party, giving 
her flowers and other fine gifts. 



Hussars Here. Hurrah! 

The Christian Associations were 
extremely fortunate when they se- 
cured "The Hussars" for February 
loth. This unique musical organiza- 
tion presents military splendor and 
action and the rollicking spirit ard 
dash of the college glees. Six of the 
members of the company form a brass 
sextette while the remaining three 
comprise a drum corps. These clever 
musicians are also capable of singing 
anything from the most popular glees 
to the grand opera choruses. This 
splendidly costumed singing band and 
brass choir Js something decidedly 
new and striking in Lyceum Concerts. 



students: 

All your demands for pennants, 
letter paper, nifty post cards and 
college supplies, can be met bv the 
COLLEGE BOOK STORE — Drop in and 
see. 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 



East Main St 



ANNVILLE 



W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

jCebanon 

College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemist* y 

and Biology 
Music, Art. Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress . 

Write for catalogue 
&vv. S. 0. Sossarcl, ^President 
jtnnvilie, ZPa. 



Have Yoo Heard the New 



GO TO IT BOYS 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



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A. S. MILLER. W. Main St. 



$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing - machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it todav. 



THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 



Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2-50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street 

The on!y_ moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 



A A ft Jf , ' S reputation and consequence in 

Alma Mater* I I Philadelphia 



Music by I. F. Loos, '02 
Words by S. R. Oldham. *02 

HARRY H, CHARLTON 

AGENT 

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Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

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COLLEGE NEWS 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 

President and Mrs. Gossard spent 
the past week in New York City. 

Josephine Mathias, '16 spent the 
week end at her home in High Spire. 

Miss Schmidt sang in the first 
Lenten services of the Zion Lutheran 
Church, Lebanon. 

Mary Daugherty '16 was called 
home, Friday, on account of the ill- 
ness of her father, Rev. Daugherty, 
of Columbia. 

Mrs. Heindel, Red Lion, visited her 
daughter, this week. The latter 
went home with her mother for a few 
days. 

Mrs. Quigley, Red Lion sent Sat- 
urday and Sunday with her daughter. 

Professor Peters, Messrs Sherk," 
Richia and Mulhollen visited the Har- 
risburg High School, Thursday. 

Helen Brightbill, '15 visited in 
Harrisburg, Saturday and Sunday. 

Mr, Leininger, '13 went to his 
home in C lambersburg, Friday. 

Soma of the students who attended 
the basket ball game at Lebanon oh 
Saturday evening are: Misses 
Kathryn Bachman, Florence Christ- 
eson, Blanche Risser, Florence Mentz, 
Vera Myers, Edith Lehman, Lottie 
Spessard, Mae Meyers; Messrs. 
Smith, Richie, Heffelfinger, Ulrich, 
Rhodes, Henry Snavely, Stickell, 
Evans, Zimmerman, Reddick and 
others 

Miss Mary Spayd, '15 was shop- 
ping in Lebanon, on Saturday. 

Miss Ruth Light, Lebanon, visited 
friends at school last week. 

Mr. Jamison, '15 and Mr. Hallman, 
Academy, made addresses at the C. E. 
Anniversary in the L. B. church, c.n 
Sunday. 

Biological Field Club 

Field Mice in Mid-Winter, J. H 
Ness; Algae in Mid-Winter, C. H. 
Arndt ; Flower Buds'and Forcing Them 
in Winter, Paul Bowman. Everybody 
welcome. 



YOUR NAME CARD 

Will best represent you if you 
get it engraved. Make your select- 
ions of the latest Types and give 
your orders to HARNISH It SMITH. 



You get only the best at 

COL LAM'S 

Quantity + * * Quality 
Main Street 

D. B. SHIFFER 

Largest Assortment of Post Cards, Tablets 
Envelopes, Pens, Inks, Mucilage, 
Toys, Etc. 

Near Post Office ANNVILLE 

"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality, 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment, 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G, SPALDING L BROS, 

26,130 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YOR* 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 

Main Street Annville, Pa. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoe* 



MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 

H. K. LONG & SON 
Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, F>a 



WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville. Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa, 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON. PA. 

RAHMRAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "UssyV 

OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

A RULE 

"Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardeen 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
ergy of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing positions. 

Every year since 1905 we have been in needo 
more applicants to fill the best positions in nearf 
ly every grade of public and private school work 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

F. L. MYERS & CO,, 
Lemoync Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Ce 
operating agencies in Denver and A tJac< 



COliliEGE 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume JY. flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, February 18, 1913 



fio. 1133^ 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Masquerade Party 

Friday evening, Feb. 14th, the 
Kalozetean Literary Society very de- 
lightfully entertained the Faculty, 
students and friends of the college 
with their annual mesquerade party. 

About two hundred people in 
costumes ranging from the sublime 
to the ridiculous furnished fun not 
only for one another, but for the many 
unmasked guests present. 

Prizes for the cleverest costumes 
were given to Miss Helen Bright- 
ill,' dressed as a Dutch boy and 
to Mr. A. A. Richie, who ap- 
peared as a sweet young thing of 
fifty. 

Honorable mention might be given 
to many of the costumes for their 
beauty and origmality. 

The Kalo Halls were prettily dec- 
orated with pennants and the usual 
Valentine tokens. 

Delicious refeshments were served. 




ADMINISTRATION BUILDING 



Debate 

The question of forming a new 
constitution for the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania will be debated be- 
tween Lebanon Valley and Juniata 
colleges, sometime in April. This 
question is certainly coming to occupy 
the center of interest in Pennsylvania 
politics and will be a question well 
suited for intercollegiate debate. An 
understanding of the question has been 
decided upon by the different de- 
bating teams and the choice of sides 
has been made. Juniata will debate the 
affirmative side of the question. The 
different teams, have contracted for 
a dual debate. The one of 1913 to 
be delivered at Juniata college and 
one for 1914 at Lebanon Valley 
College. 

We will be represented by 
Messrs. Mulhcllen '13, Rihie, '13 and 
Snavely '14. 



This building was erected in 1905. 
The former Administration building 
was burned Dec. 24, 1904. The 
present building contains the recita- 
tion rooms of the college and the 



laboratories of the science department. 
The department of art has here com- 
modious and modern quarter. The 
administration offices of fire proof 
construction are on the first floor. 



Oratory Recital 

On Tuesday evening, February 11, 
the Oratory department, under the 
direction of Miss Adams gave a splen- 
did program to a rather large audi- 
ence. The program consisted of four 
readings, a dramatic sketch and two 
piano numbers by conservatory stu- 
dents. The readings were varied and 
very entertaning and held the atten- 
tion of the audience throughout their 
rendition. 

The dramatic sketch, however, 
entitled "A picked up dinner" was 
extremely interesting and entertain- 
ing. The rapid action, the quick 
movement of the dialogue and the 
humor of ''Biddy" made this sketch 
one of the most delightful short plays 
ever given in the Oratory Recitals. 



Miss Adams is to be high- 
ly congratulated upon the work 
of her pupils as demonstrated during 
that evening. The following is the 
program in full :— 

Piano solo, Mr. Clarence Barnets; 
Reading, ''The Fiddle Told", Miss 
Jo. Uricti ; Reading, ''Little Helping 
Hands", Miss Blanch Risser: Read- 
ing, "Greek meets Greek," Mr. 
Harry Charlton; Reading,' "The Old 
U. S. , " Miss Edith M. Lehman ; Piano 
solo, Miss Mabel Bensing; Dramatic 
sketch, " The Picked-up-Dinner'% 
characters : Mr. Thompson, Mr. Mul- 
hollen; Mrs. Thompson, Miss Bright- 
bill; Biddy, Miss Edna Yarkers. 



Miss Mary Pastor, of Harrisburg,. 
was a guest of Katherine Bachman. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fierjus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 

CLARA HORN, '13 
Athletics 
IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, 13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

Assistants 
HARRY CHARLTON '14 
PHILO STATTON '15 Asst. 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Star Course 

The fourth number of the Star 
CourB) was given in the College 
Chapel Saturday evening, February 
15th, when the Hussars, "a singing 
Dand" of nine entertaining specialists 
rendered a splendid program before 
one of the largest audiences of the 
year. 

The program was divided into three 
parts, instrumental, college and 
military, and it would bs hard to say 
which part was most appreciated. 
Everyone within hearing of the 
*'Band" pronounced their concert ex- 
cellent. 

The Sleighride in the second part 
was very amusing and realistic. Of 
course the usual spill occurred and 
the party had to walk home. The 
readings and solo work were especially 
good. 

The fifth and closing number of 
the Star Course will take place on 
March 25th, when The Emily Water- 
man Concert Company come to 
Annville. 

Three prime qualifications for an 
efficient worker are grace, grit, and 
gumption- "and the greatest of these" 
is gumption. West 



Inter Collegiate 

Professor George Herbert Palmer, 
'64 and Professor Frances Greenwood 
Peabody, '69, Harvard, two of the 
oldest members of the Faculty of Arts 
and Sciences, Harvard, have resigned 
and have been made Professors Emerti. 
The former's title is Emertius Alford 
Professor of Natural Religion, Moral 
Philosophy, and Civil Polity. The 
latter's title is now Emeritus Plum- 
mer Professor of Christian morals. 

Brown University is making plans 
for the celebration of the one hundred 
and fiftieth anniversary of the found- 
ing of the institution, which will be 
held early in October 1914. Brown's 
charter was granted by the General 
Assembly of the Rhode Island and 
Providence Plantation in 1764. 

President W. G. Clippinger, Otter- 
bein University, delivered an address 
before the Central Ohio Schoolmast- 
ers Club, at Columbus, on "Voca- 
tional Training in Colleges • and 
Secondary Schools." 

President M. R. Drury, Philomoth 
College, Philomoth, Oregon, has been 
elected Mayor of that town for the 
second term. 

Y. M. C. A. 

The meeting of Sunday was Ifd by 
Mr. John 0. Jones, '15, who based 
his remarks on "Personal Sacrifice." 
He read for the lessen Romans : 12. 
Mr. Jones grouped men in three 
classes; first, men who, when they die, 
are little missed by their fellowmen, 
because their striving here was to 
promote their own personal interests 
while the interests of the group in 
which they lived wuuld suffer; The 



second class, when they die, are 
missed for a while by society, but 
their place is easilly filled and the loss 
is only temporarily felt. In the third 
class are those persons who have 
striven to reach a definite idea, those 
who have had a purpose in life and 
made personal interests secondary to 
the welfare of society. In its group 
he put the character Samuel. 

In treating the subject from a local 
point of view, Mr. Jones emphasized 
the concentration of effort along such 
lines as will advance the highest in- 
terests of the student body, the col- 
lege and the Kingdom of God. 



Conservatory Notes 

Mrs. E. Edwin Sheldon entertained 
the Conservatory Seniors at dinner on 
Wednesday evening, Feb. 12th. 

Miss Mary Painter '14, of Hershey, 
has been absent from the Conserva- 
tory for two weeks because of illness. 

Miss Ruth Hammer, of Penbrook, 
has been obliged to miss classes for 
the past ten days on account of illness, 

At the Recital Class, Feb. 4th, the 
following took part on the program : 
Misses Quigley, Bensing, Ryland, and 
Messrs. Botts, Barnet and Witman. 



"Here," began a woman, "here's 
an article in the paper on 'Woman's 
Work for the Feeble-Minded. ' " 

Hei husband grunted. 

"I'd like to know," he said, 
"what women have ever done for the 
feeble-minded?" 

"They usually marry them, dear," 
replied his wife sweetly. 



SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 

Enclosed please find One Dollar for College News subscrip- 
tion. Send News to following address: 

Name ....... . . . . . . ^. . 4 ; . . . . • • - 

Street 

City State » 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 
Chorus, Misses Christeson, Bright- 
bill, Gingrich, Bachman, Spessarct, 
Spayd, Bachman, Zimmerman; Wash- 
ington, the soldier, Florence Mentz; 
Reading, Blanche Risser; Incidents 
in the Life of Washington, Catherine 
Bachman; Martha Washington, Sara 
Zimmerman; Conditions of the 
Country during Washington's Ad- 
ministration, Edna E. Yarkers; Piano 
Solo, Lotte Spessard; Olive Branch. 

KALOZETEAN 
Current Events, Alfred Krause; 
Vocal solo, Marcel Von Bergehy; 
Book Review, Verling Jamison; Par- 
limentary Drill, Leaders, C. Y. 
Ulrich, Victor Heffelfinger, Boaz 
Light, John Lyter; Examiner, Editor; 
Chorus, Society. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 

WASHINGTON BIRTHDAY AN- 
NIVERSARY 

Chips from the Cherry Tree, G. A. 
Richie; Washington's Home Life, 
C E. Brenneman ; Debate : Resolved 
That, Georga Washington should be 
pictured as a perfect man to American 
school children. Affirmative, Geo. 
Haverstock, Gideon Blouch. Nega- 
tive, Clyde Lynch, Lester Snyder; 
Harp solo, D. Leonard Reddick; Im- 
promptu, V. D. Mulhollen; The New 
Freedom, H. L. Olewiler.. Visitors 
elcome. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The meeting was conductpd by 
Elizabeth Rechard, ' 13 using as her 
subject, "Being Happy." She gave 
as a basis for her remarks, "A merry 
eart maketh a cheerful countenance, 
ut by sorrow of heart the spirit is 
broken." Pleasantness is a duty we 
°we to God and to our fellowmen. 
We become "blue" when we think of 
ourselves and then do we consider its 
effect upon those around us. Every 
Person should have the power to be 
Pleasant even when things go wrong. 

"If you can't do anything else to 
help along just smile." 

Miss Richardson, the territorial 
ecretary of Md. Del., and Penna., 
'11 visit our association this week. 



"If you wish to save an Editor 
from despondency, subscribe to his 
paper. If you wish to save him from 
bankruptcy, pay your subscription. If 
you wish to save him from mistake, 
bury him." Oberlin Review. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 



Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 



oCebanon l/al/ey 
Coi/ege 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

a?id Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 



Write for catalogue 

&ev. S. 2). Sossar^ President 
Jfnnoiliej {Pa. 



Have You Heard the New 

Alma Mater 1 

Music by f. F. Loos, '02 
Words by S. R. Oldham. '02 

HARRY H, CHARLTON 

AGENT 



One sent postpaid on receipt of 25c. 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER. W. Main St. 



$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 



Civil, 

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SCHOOL of V\ 



ENGINEERING 

Mechanical, Electrical 

TROY, N.Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 




Items of Interest 




The High School in Chambersburg 
closed that the teachers might visit 
other schools. Five visited Reading 
and Lebanon: J. L. Appenzellar, 
Principal, graduated here 1908; Miss 
Rilla Huber, Miss Mary Seiders, Miss 
Edith Smith, Miss Margaret Roasman. 

Miss Miriam Oyer, Shippensburg, 
was the guest of Miss Clippinger. 

Miss Esther Engle, Harrisburg, 
spent the week end with her sisters, 
Ruth and Larene Engle, 

Frank Shearer, of Harrisburg, spent 
the week end with friends at the Col- 
lege. 

John and Frank Morrison, of Steel- 
ton, were among the guests at the 
Kalo masquerade. 

Among the Lebanon guests at the 
Masquerade party on Friday evening 
were the Misses Ruth and Ethyl 
Strickler, Avon Light, Simeon Grier, 
Thomas Lineaweaver and Miss Light. 



Let's All Go To Lebanon 

Don't forget the game with 
Susquehanna at Lebanon in the Y. M. 
C. A. building, Saturday evening at 
eight o'clock. The car leaves Ann- 
ville at 7:15 and the train at 7:05. 
Be sure to go and [see "our team trim 
the Selins Grove boys. The boys 
played nobly against the Y. M. C. A. 
team two weeks ago and a good crowd 
of students were down at Lebanon to 
see the game but we want a better 
representation this time. N " Let's all 
go to Lebanon." Don't forget! 



"Who can describe a caterpillar?" 
asked the teacher. 

"I can,' shouted Tommy. 
"Well. Tommy, what is it?" 
"An upholstered worm." 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNViLLE 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 



Quantity * » * Quality 
Main Street 



"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more on' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality, 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 



A. G, SPALDING L BROS, 

26430 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YORU! 



"Dad, there's a strange man at Journal Publishing Co. 

the front door who says he must see 

"Great Scott ! Has he got a Printers 

bill?" 

"No; just a red nose." Main Street Annville, Pa. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoe* 

MAKE A GOOD SHOWING 

Clean linens are essential. If 
you want to be pleased give 
your LAUNDRY work to 

R. & R. CO. 

Rodes Reddick 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 
Parties a Specialty 

II. F\ LONG & SON 
Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, Pa 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville. Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St. 



Annville, Pa, 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

' Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

rahTrah! boys eat 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



A BULE 



"Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardeen 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
ergy of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing positions. 

Every year since 1905 we have been in need of 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school work. 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co, 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COIiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume fV. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, February 25, 1913 



No. 14 



Entered as second-class mutter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 




CARNEGIE LIBRARY 

This building was erected in 1904. Each department has its particular books for reference in addition to a 
large number of volumes for general reference and- study. 

Two large reading rooms on the first floor are provided with the leading magazines and daily papers. The large 
assembly room on the second floor is used by the Oratory Department, Also six Seminar rooms for the various 
Departments. 



Boy's Glee Club Trip 

The Boy's Glee Club returned to 
school on Sunday from a very enjoy- 
able trip through the Ljkens Valley. 
Their first engagement was at Jones- 
town where they gave a splendid con- 
cert to a large crowd of the Jonestown 
people. Here the entire club was 
feasted after the concert on a chicken 
and waffle supper. 

Their next concert, on Friday even- 
ing was given at Lykens, and the 
third at Elizabethville. At all these 
Places the bovs weie treated royally 
and their manager was well pleased 
with the financial results of the trip, 
also. They sang to audiences at 
both of these places of three to four 



hundred. The club reported a very 
good time and they are anxious for 
tne next trip arranged by the man- 
ager, Mr. A Kin Weaver '15, for the 
latter part of^this week 'when they go 
to Harrisburg, Duncannon and Dills- 
burg. 



Calendar 

Wednesday, 7:30 — Mathematical 
Round Table and Deutscher Verein. 

Friday, 7 p. m.— Literary Societies. 

Sunday, 1 p. m. — Christian Associ- 
ations. 

Tuesday, 6 p. m —prayer meeting. 



Miss Belle Orris was called to her 
home in*Steelton. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Sunday was observed as Day of 
Prayer for students by the Y. M. C. 
A. Mr. Charles F. Arndt '14 was 
leader. He chose for the lesson Luke 
II, 1 — 14, and spoke on the benefit 
of prayer in the individual's life, the 
power which it brings to the sincere 
follower of Christ over self, and then 
his influence; upon his associates. Mr. 
Arndt referred to the men who have 
left an enviable record as those men 
who held close fellowship with God in 
piayer. 

Thp attendance was small, but the 
meeting was interesting from begin- 
ning to end. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fiecus 

Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 
CLARA HORN, '13 

Athletics 

IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Assistants 

PHILO STATTON '15 Asst. 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 

Editorial 

During the present month we cele- 
brate the birthdays of some of the 
greatest men the world ever produced 
Their lives and memories are brought 
before us with renewed vigor and hon- 
ored_for what they have meant to cur 
high civilization. Not only from 
a military and diplomatic standpoint 
but from a literary and scientific as 
well, has the month of February 
highly favored us. 

We admire the courage and far- 
sightedness of General Washington, 
who in the face of the greatest diffi- 
culties and under the most trying cir- 
cumstances became the hero of Valley 
Forge. Other men have also been of 
great value to our beloved country and 
yet considering them all, who can 
surpass this illustrious American 
patriot, general and statesman. The 
one who presided over the National 
Convention assembled at Philadelphia, 
to consolidate the National Constitu- 
tion and place the first Federal system 
of government on a firm and perman- 
ent basis. 

Then too in the terrible crisis of 
the Civil War, the famous Abraham 
Lincoln who in his earlier life per- 
formed the feat of splitting three hun- 
dred rails in a day, which gave him 



the popular sobriquet of "the rail- 
splitter, forged to the front. " "With 
malice toward none with charity to 
all," he piloted the Ship of Stutfi 
through stormy seas which were to 
tell, "whether that nation or any 
nation so conceived and so dedicated 
could long endure." His memory is 
still more sacred to us because of his 
prematue death caused by the bullet 
of the cruel assassin. 

We now turn to the quieter walks 
of life and we find that February also 
presents us with a great literary- 
leader in the person of Henry Wads- 
worth Longfellow His works con- 
tain much that is beautiful and much 
that is given place in the hearts of 
the American people. His poems are 
equally popular on both sides of the 
Atlantic. 

In our list of great men this month 
comes the name of Charles Dawi". 
His strength lay in his pewers as a 
scientist. He lived the life of a quiet 
country gentleman engrossed in scien- 
tific pursuits, expermenting, observ- 
ing, recording, reflecting and general- 
izing. His name attained its great 
celebrity by the publication of "The 
Origin of Species by Means of Natural 
Selection." This work scouted and 
derided though it was at first in certain 
quarters, may be said to have worked 
nothing less than a revolution in bio- 
logical science. 

Surely there is much in the lives of 
these men mentioned which we can 
extract and embody in our own 
character. 

Washington's Birthday at L.V. 

The birthday of the Father of our 
country was celebrated here in a very 
novel but much appreciated way. 
About one o'clock p. m., a familiar 
bell rang thro' the halls of that 
building across the way known as the 
"Ladies Dorm." The students as- 
sembled there, strolled thro' these 
halls with the semblance of careless- 
ness but beneath that feigned mask, 
hearts beat high with the thought of 
what was to follow. For there in the 
room beyond was spread a feast fit 
for a King but intended for L. V. 
students and faculiy. After each one 
had found his plsce, there was a 
scuffle of chairs and then a silence. 
The dinner had begun. Faces smiled, 



eyes beamed and hands were busy. 
Wit and humor and gay chatter was 
mingled with the viands on the table 
and everyone seemed happy. When 
the last crumb had been eaten a 
slight confusion attracted all eyes to 
one end of the dining-room where a 
gentleman had the floor. The toast 
master had arisen. Here the best 
part of the feast was just beginning, 
in order of classes the following 
toasts responded to the call of the— 
Toastmaster, Mr. Leininger '13; 
To the Memory of George Washing- 
ton, Clara Horn '13; The Group 
System, Leonard Redick '14; The 
Fowl, Wm. C. Carl '15; Evergreen, 
Esther Heintzleman '16. Dr. Gossard 
also talked to the student*?. 

The subject of his remarks was 
chiefly the future of Lebanon Valley. 
Besides Dr. and Mrs. Gossard and 
Treasurer and Mrs. Weaver, other 
guests were present. The menu was 
as follows : 

grape fruit 
roast chicken 
cranberry sauce filling 
lima beans scalloped oysters 
mashed potatoes creamed onions 
celery olives 
waldorf salad 
wafers 
cherry ice cream cake 
mints chocolate candies 
salted nuts coffee. 



Alumni 

Mr. G. W. W. Hanger '84, act- 
ing Federal Commissioner of Labor of 
U« S. was one of the mediators to 
settle the dispute between the eastern 
railroads^and the Brohterhcod of Loco- 
motive Firemen and Enginemen. 

Mr. Alfred K. Mills '04, has been ap- 
pointed clerk to Senator D. P. Gerber. 
ich, of Lebanon, president pro-tern of 
the state senate. 

Fehiuary 15th , Doctor and Mrs. I. 
H. Albright celphrated their fortieth 
wedding anniversary. Dr. Albright, '76 
is pastor of the United Brethren 
church, Middletown. 

Miss Helen Weidler '12, was the 
guest of Clara Horn over the week 
end. Miss Weidler is Professor of 
English in the High School, High 
Bridge, N. J. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 
Piano solo, .Josephine Urich ; The 
Epic 'of the Indian, Mary Spayd ; 
Vocal solo, Florence Christeson; De- 
bate Resolved : The Opportunities of 
a Greatf Singer are~Greater than those 
of a Great Player. Affirmative, Ora 
Bachman, Do*a Ryland. Negative, 
Velma Heindel, Ruth Quigley; 
Sketch, Josephine Matthias, Esther 
Heintzelman; Piano solo, Edith Ging 
rich. 

KALOZETEAN 
Current events, A. D. Metzger. ; 
paper, Edgar Landis; Debate: Re- 
solved, That Classics are of More 
Educational Value Than Mathematics. 
Affirmativve, George Williams, Carl 
F. Schmidt. Negaitve, Edward 
Mutch, Charles Arndt; Extempore, 
Chorus, society 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
The Chronicle, Russel Hoffer; N. 
Y. Central's New Terminal, Paul 
Bowman; Debate: Resolved, That a 
Convention Should be Called for the 
Purpose of Forming a New Consti- 
tution for the Commonwealth of 
Pennsylvania. Affirmative, L. B. 
Harnish, J. F. Leininger. Negative, 
Clarence Ulrich, J. E. Sherk ; Vocal 
solo, George F. Botts; Original 
story, J. 0. Jones; Living Thoughts. 

Y. W. C. A. 

The General Committee of the 
World's Student Christian Federation 
had set apart Sunday, February 23, 
1913, as the Universal Day of Prayer 
for students. This wa3 observed by 
the Y. W. C. A., Edna E. Yarkers 
'13, the leader, gave a short history 
of the World's Student Christian Fed- 
eration. The motto of 1 his movement 
is, "Ona in Christ" and its purpcses 
are, "United Christian movements 
and promote friendly relations; L<?ad 
students to Jesus Christ as their only 
Savior and Lord; Enlist all students 
in Chrisitan services. " 

Miss Richardson, the Territorial 
Secretary of Md. Del. and Pa , was a 
guest of the Y. W. C A. Feb. 19-21. 
Wednesday afternoon the girls of the 
Y. W. C. A. entertained in her honor. 

Mips Richardson made an address in 
chapel. She spoke lo the cabinet and 
committee members and gave splendid 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
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we avoid this quicksand by standard 
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Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment, 
Catalogue Free. 

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26430 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YORK 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 
H. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, Pa 



WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO- 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

A RULE 

"Tut this down as a rule," savs Dr. Bardeen 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
01 a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teaeheis, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
erg} of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose anmiallv hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiencv. Our work 
along this line will be continued 'as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing posiii ns. 

Every year since 1905 we have been in need of 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school work. 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lcmoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Cc, 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



suggestions for the advancement of 
our woik. Her visit was v^ry profit- 
able. 

ITEMS OF INTEREST 

Miss Hazel Quigley, ex-'13, visited 
at school this week. 

A large crowd of students attended 
the game at Lebanon on Friday. 

Mr. Victor Mulhollen '13, partici- 
pated in a program in the U. B. 
church, on Sunday evening, celebrat- 
ing the centennial of the birth of 
David Livingstone. Mr. Mulhollen 
very ably read a sketch of the life of 
that hero. 

Mr. John D. Jones went to his 
home in Paradise lust week. 

Miss Ethel Houser spent Saturday 
and Sunday in Baltimore, Md. 

Rev. A N. Horn, of Red Lion, 
Pa., visited his daughter Miss Clara 
Horn last week. 

Mr. J. K. Lehman was in trwn cn 
Saturday and Sunday, at the home of 
his parents. Mr. Lehman was re- 
cently employed in the laboratories of 
the Sernet-Sioay Co., at Steelton. 

Miss Florence E. Christeson '13 
visited in Philadelphia last week. 

Several of the L. V. students as- 
sisted at a Rental in the Trinity U. 
B. church in Lebanon last week. Miss 
Spessard '13 and Miss Gingrich '12 
both sang. Miss Brightbill '15 read 
several selections. 

Miss Brown who was Professor 
of voice '10-'ll. was a guest of Mrs. 
Sheldon, Sunday. Miss Brown has 
charge of the Voice Department at 
Susquehanna at present. 

Mr. Evans, '16 visited his parents 
at Lykens, Satrduay and Sunday. 

Verling W. Jamison on Monday 
evening most delightfully entertained 
the following persons at dinner in 
honor of his birthday: G. A. Will- 
iams, H. M. Bender, John Long, and 
R. W. Williams. 

Y. M. C. A. Convention 

The forty-fifth annual convention of 
the Young Men's Christian Associa- 
tion of Pennsylvania was held at 
Williamsport, Pa., February 20 to 23 
inclusive. 

About four hundred delegates and 
secretaries represented the City, Rail- 



COLLEGE NEWS 



road and Student Associations of the 
state. 

Various phases of Y. M. C. A. 
work were discussed by the Hon. 
Gifford Pincl ot,"National Conservator, 
Washington D. C. ; Dr. George J. 
Fisher of the International Physical 
Department of New York; Dr. Erwin 
H. Rihcards Missionary, Translator 
and lecturer on Africa; Dr. Peter 
Roberts of the International Immi- 
grant Depa tment of New York and 
by other prominent men. 

The main themes of the convention 
were "Association Output" and 
"Efficiency." Definite plans were 
given how to make the work more 
successful with no more work than is 
now being done. 

L. B Harnish '14 and J. E. Sherk 
'13 represented the Y. M. C. A. of L. 
V. C. 



Z. S. O. LIGHT 

Justice of the Peace 
Newspapers and Magazines 

Washington Hotel 

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W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

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COIi Li* 



E flEWS 





LEBANON 


VALLEY COLLEGE 




Volume /V. 


Annville, Pa. 


, Tuesday, fA&Peh 4, 1913 




Entgred a 


s second-class matter November 12, 


1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 





The National Education Asso- 
ciation 

The Department of Superintendence 
of the National Education Association 
met last week in Philadelphia, the 
sessions extending throughout the 
week. In addition to those of the 
Department of Superintendence meet- 
ings were also held by various allied 
organizations, among which were the 
National and the Pennsylvania 
Associations of College and University 
Teachers of Education, the National 
Council of Education, the National 
Congress of Mothers and Parent- 
teachers Associations, the National 
Committee on Agricultural Education, 
etc. Most of the meetings were held 
in the magnificant Bellevue-Stratford 
Hotel, the Ball Room ~ of which seats 
several thousand people and which has 
in addition at least four other rooms 
seating several hundred each. 

The meetings were attended by 
twenty-five hundred teachers from all 
parts of the country. The majority 
of these were state, county, and city 
superintendents but there were also 
many university, cc liege, and normal 
school presidents and professors, and 
principals and teachers in high 
schools. It was certainly inspiring 
to be in touch with men a nd women 
"rom every pr.rt of the nation work- 
ing together at the solution of our 
comtron educational problem?. 

The speakeis were the most pro- 
minent leaders of educational thought 
in America. Among them were such 
en as Presidents Hibben of Princeton 
n d Meicklejohn of Amherst, and 
Professors Judd of Chicago, Hanus of 
Harvard, Bagley uf Illinois, and 
Yocum of Pennsylvania. Perhaps the 
roost prominent among the city 
uperintendents were Dyer of Boston, 
resident of the Association, Spauld- 
n g of Newton, Massachusetts, and 
rancis of Los Angeles, California, a 
Continued on page 2 



Inter-Collegiate Prohibition 

The great "fight on" between the 
temperance and liquor forces was 
bronght strongly to our minds by the 
visit of Charles Young.- Field Secre- 
tary of the Inter-collegiate Prohibi- 
tion Association League. Mr. Young 
said that he found that the interest 
regarding this vital problem was 
small among the colleges and univer- 
sities because mental occupation was 
given to other things. The vital 
question at present is, "What does 
the American people think about this 
liquor evil?" This can be answered 
partly by the great agitation, that is 
working against all the "great evils. " 

The liquor problem is being studied 
today as jt has not been studied before. 
Chemistry is testing the purity of. all 
liquor; Sociology is trying to prove 
whether the saloon is a good social 
centre; economics is studying it in 
view of the income of cur country. 

The purpose of Mr. Young's visit 
was to organize a Prohibition League 
and arouse interest for a local league 
contest. 

Base Ball 

The coming of spring sets the 
wheels of base ball into motion. L. 
V. will no*" be wanting in material for 
a strong ceam. When the call for 
practice will be usued by captain 
Lyter many new men will be among 
those to report. Of the new men 
perhaps Dearolf and Spangler will 
show up the strongest. 

Five of last years team is still at 
school. They are captain Lyter, 
"Tom" Lyter, Larew, Snaveiy, and 
Stickell. With these men as a 
nucleus, both captain Lyter and coach 
Pritchard feel confident that they can 
build up a very strong team. 

Manager Ressler has arranged a 
particularly strong schedule. There 
are several new schools on it among 
which are Dickinson, Susquehanna, 



Bucknell and Georgetown University* 

One of the features of the season wil* 

be a week's trip in Virginia and 

Maryland. Following is the schedule : 

March 26— Lehigh at South Bethle- 
hem. 

April 5— Mercersburg at Mercers- 
burg. 

April 12-Dickinson at Carlisle. 
April 19— Delaware at Annville. 
April 21 — Eastern college at 
Manassas, Va. 

April 22— Georgetown University at 
Washington D. C. 

April 23 — Delaware at Newark, 
Del. 

April 2i — Washington college at 
Chestertown, Md. 

April 25 -Reck Hill College at 
Ellicott City, Md. 

May 3— Open (away) 

May 10-Gettysburg at Annville. 

May 16- Susquehanna Univeristy at 
Annville. 

May 17 — Albright at Annville. 

May 23— Susquehanna University at 
Selinsgrove. 

May 24— Bucknell University at 
Lewisburg. 

May 30- Albright at Myerstown. 

June 5— Juniata at Annville. 

June 7— Albright at Annville. 

June 11 — Alumni at Annville. 



Boys Glee Club 

The Boy's Glee Club made another 
very successful trip last week, 
especially successful in a financial 
way. The first concert was given at 
Harrisburg to an audience of 800 
people. The concert was worked up 
by 125 patrons and patronesses under 
the management of Harry Edwin Ul- 
rich. On Friday everiig they sang 
at Duncannon where the concert was 
managed by J. F. Reed '12, On 
Saturday they sang at Dillsburg to a 
crowd of 500 people. 

Mr. Alvin Weaver is now working 
on a trip for Lancaster county and 
another for the Lykens Valley. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College l^ecjus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 
CLARA HORN, '13 

Athletics 

IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 
Assistants 
PHILO STATTON '15 Asst. 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

t0 all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 

Editorial 

How many of us, if we were called 
upon to do so, could give an in- 
telligible account of the Balkan war, 
the troubles in Mexico or even the 
proceedings of the "Money Trust 
Probers" here in our own nation? 
It is a common fault among college 
students that thiy become too much 
absorbed in their work and the 
activities of the school to keep in 
touch with the world outside. It is 
natural that students should be in- 
clined to do this but it is an inclina- 
tion that should be resisted. The man 
or woman in college is presumably 
preparing for service in actual life. 
Preparation for the rendition of effi- 
cient, intelligent, sympathetic service 
to the world is one of the aims of a 
college education. If this service is 
to be qualified with these three 
attributes mentioned, it is necessary 
for him in school to have some know- 
ledge of the world, its problems and 
its needs and its conditions. It be- 
hooves him in college to keep in 
touch with the world as he shall find 
it upon leaving that narrow circle. 

Here the student has no excuse but 
thoughtlessness or carelessness to 
offer. Our library is comparatively 
well stocked with newspapers and 



current periodicals. If every student 
would spend an hour or two a week 
at our magazine table, this fault could 
be remedied to a great extent. One 
half hour a day would give one a very 
adequate knowledge of public affairs 
and interests. Should we not do this 
to make ourselves well rounded stu- 
dents? It is a suggestion. 

The National Education Asso- 
ciation 

Continued from page 1 

member of the United Brethren Church 
and formerly a student at Otterbein 
University, P. P. Claxton, United 
States Comissioner of Education, and 
the state superintendent of most of 
the states of the union were present 
throughout the week. 

Many problems were discussed but 
among those which received most 
serious consideration were the problem 
of the rural schools, economy in school 
affairs, and the tendency toward 
vocational education. 

In almost every session of the 
association the necessity of conform- 
ing education to the practical pro- 
blems of life was emphasized. The 
movement toward industrial emphasis 
was regarded as not only irresistible 
but|also healthy. It was held that 
the business of the schools is to pre- 
pare for real life and not give merely 
a veneer of culture. The evenings 
sessions were purposely set aside for 
emphasis upon the more conservative 
and the more idealistic side and there 
such speakeis as Presidents Hibben 
and Meicklejohn effectively reminded 
the teachers that the narrowly practi- 
cal in education could be carried too far 
and that to truely educate the youth 
we must not forget that they must 
first of all be made men and women 
and not merely efficient machines— 
that there is still, as there has always 
been, a large place for the humane 
and the cultural in the training of our 
young men and women. 

The other matter most emphasized 
was the need of efficiency in school 
affairs. How to make the resources 
at the command of the school count 
for most has for a generation or more 
been a serious problem at all meet- 
ings of school masters and will con- 
tinue to be as long as teachers retain 



their accustomed earnestness. The 
failure of pupils was regarded as, 
waste of life for wh ; ch not so much 
the pupil as the school was re- 
sponsible. Methods of studying and 
of eliminating this as well as other 
wastes— including, of course, financial 
waste— were set fourth in carefully 
elaborated form, by such able stu- 
dents of the matter as Spaulding, 
Judd, Knaus, Bagley, and others. 
Altogether the meeting was, as the 
retiring president said, one of the 
most sucessful in the hiatory of the 
association, and that is saying much 
for the E. A. has been for many years 
a most important and influential or- 
ganization in educational affairs. 

The staff is indebted to Professor 
Peters for this report. 

Joint Meeting of the Christian 
Associations 

The meeting of the Y. W. C. A. 
and Y. M. C. A. was both inter- 
esting and instructive. The subject 
of the meeting was "The Student and 
the Sermon on the Mount." The meet- 
ing wa3 opened with a few songs and 
prayers, after which Miss Edna Yar- 
kers '13, read the very helpful lesson: 
"Christ's Sermon on the Mount." 
The reading of the lesson was followed 
by a vocal solo, by Miss Edith Freed 
'10, who was here visi'ing her mother. 
The subject: ''Hypocrisy" was then 
ably discussed by Mr. V. D. Mul- 
h'.llen, '13. 

Another very interesting feature of 
the- program was a vocal solo: "The 
Love That Will Not Let Me Go," by 
our voice teacher, Miss Schmidt. 

We are always pleased to have sjch 
meetings; they are inspiring and are 
really the kind we should have every 
Sunday if every one of us wouid lend 
the ten or the two talents— whichever 
amount we possess— to the success of 
the Christian work of the school. 

Basket Ball 

The lust game of the season, Leba- 
non Valley with Muhlenburg. This 
will be played on the Y. M. C. A, 
floor, Lebanon, March 18h. We are 
proud of our team for they have done 
well under the existing circumstances. 

Let us give them our hearty sup* 
port. Don't forget Saturday, Marcb 
8, 1913. 



COLL EG E NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 

CLIONIAN 

Violin solo, Ruth E. Engle; paper, 
Status of Women in Barbarous Ages, 
Ruth V. Engle; Saint Patrick, Irene 
Hershey; Reading, Maud Baker; 
Need and Value of Y. W. C. A. in 
Colleges, P'lorence flippinger; Piano 
solo, Ruth Whisl eyman ; Olive Branch, 
Elta Weaver. 

KALOZETEAN 

Current events, Marcel Von Ber- 
gehy; paper, The Social Order in 
American Towns, Faber Stengel; 
paper, As Europeans See Us, I. Clyde 
Eby; Tiombone solo, Thomas B. 
Lyter; paper, The Public Schools and 
Universal Peace, Harry Bender ; piano 
solo, Paul L. Strickler; Extempore, 
chorus, society. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Review of the Inauguration, John 
Ness; How the Railroad is Moderizing 
Asia, Edward Smith; Debate: Re- 
solved, That Women Should be Given 
the Right of Suffrage. Affirmative, 
H. Wrightstone, Conrad Curry. 
Negative, Allen Engle, Harold 
Risser; piano solo, Ellis Zimmerman; 
Glee Club Trip from the Side Line, 
Lester Rodes; Dippy— Dills, Sedic 
Rine. 



Mathematical Round Table 
[Anniversary 

Wednesday night, Feb. 28th, the 
Mathematical Round Table celebrated 
its fifth anniversary. 

Counting games, a geometry class 
and a mathematical spelling bee fur- 
nished fun for the members and their 
guests. 

Everybody was then brought into 
the Round Table and served with 
Maple walnut and cherry i'cp cream 
and delicious chocolate cake. 

The following guests were present- 
Misses Mary Spayd and Esta Ware- 
heim, Prof. Shroyer, and Mefsrs. 
Richie, Mulhollen and Heintzelman. 



Mt. St. Mary's 41— L. V. 26 

In an interesting game L. V. 
dropped a game of basket ball to 
"The Mountaineers" at Emmitsburg. 

The L. V. b^ys were somewhat 
fatiqued after the long, tiresome trip 
and hence were not in the best condi- 
tion to put a fast exhibition. At any 



rate they kept Mt. St. Mary's on the 
jump throughout the game. The first 
half ended 28-7 in favor of "The 
Mountaineers." L. V. completely 
outplayed them in the second half 
and scored more points. The line up: 



GO TO IT BOYS 



Costello 

Philips 

Ryan 

Maloy 

Lear 



forward 

forward 

centre 

guard 

guard 



Strickler 
Dearolf 

Miller 
Schmidt 

Larew 




Items of ' nterest ^J 

Miss Adams, Miss Johnson, Miss 
Schmidt and Miss Seltzer went to 
Harrisburg, Friday, to see "Robin 
Hood." 

A number of the students have 
joined the choir for the Nicholson- 
Hemminger meetings. 

Clara Horn '13 and Edna E. Yar- 
kers '13 visited the Lebanon High 
School, Friday afternoon. 

Mrs. Freed and Miss Freed spent 
Saturday afternon in Hershey. 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 



A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

Lebanon l/alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System, 

Special Facilities in Chemist? y 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 



Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 



Write for catalogue 
ttev. S. 0. Sossard, iPresideni 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 



$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only_ moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polytechnic institute 



%, SCHOOL of V\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, IM-Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Mr. Dunmire, a former member 
of the Conservatory, now of Lebanon, 
spent Sunday afternoon with Mr. Mu!- 
hollen '13. 

President Gossard and Professor 
Peters attended the convention of the 
National Education Association _ in 
Philadelphia, last week. 

' Miss Lottie M. Spessard '13, has 
been confined to her home with an 
attack of tonsolitis. 

In the absence of Principal Dotter 
and Miss Goldie Weidler of the Ann- 
ville High School the following stud- 
ents, who are taking a course in High 
School education, were allowed to do 
practise teaching under the supervision 
of Professor Peters: Mr. J E. Sherk, 
Mr. G. A. Williams, Mr. Victor Mul- 
hollen, Mr. H. E. Snavely, Miss 
Lottie Spessard, Mr. Russel Weidler 
and Miss Edith Lehman. 

Miss Bertha Spessard, a former 
student and her sister Miss Minnie 
Spessard are on their way to Oregon 
where they will live with Mr. Lester 
Spessard '11, who is farming in that 
state. 




Miss Edith Freed 'lu, Berwyn, 
visited her mother, Mrs. Freed, over 
the week end. 

Miss Edna Kilmer, '12, has secured 
a position in the High School at High 
Bridge, N. J. 

Rev. F. B. Plummer, '05, has been 
meeting with great success as pastor 
of thfc Otterbein Memorial United 
Brethren church, Baltimore. He says 
that during the recent three weeks 
revival one hundred and two were con- 
verted. Every Sunday morning he 
meets the junior congregation for five 
minutes. The church membership is 
six hundred and fifty, and the Sunday 
School enrollment about one thousand. 

Mr. William E. Herr '07, took a 
short trip in an aeroplane several 
weeks ago while cn a visit at Guar.- 
tanamo Bay, Cuba. He was in the 
air for over an hour and went along 
the coast for several miles. 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only the 


best at j 


GOLLAM 


I'S 


Quantity * ' * 


Quality 


Main Street 





The 

Leader" 



THAT'S 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment, 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G, SPALDING & BROS, 

26^130 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YORK 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 

Main Street Annville, Pa. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and CELTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

W. D. ELLIOTT 

Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 

M. F\ LONG & SON 
Rear Eagle Hotel A.«nville, F>a 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa 

For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES, ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON. PA. 

RAHilAH! SOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MIL LER W. MAIN ST. 

A RULE 

"Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardeefl 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." . * 

During twentv-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and eft 
ergj of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency; OurworK 
along this line will be continued as hope rum 
and as good naturediy as heretofore; for we firm 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing positions. 

Every vear since 1905 we have been in nee't Of 
more applicants to till the best positions in near 
ly every grade of public and private school worK 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COIiliEGE JiEJ 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGIA 



Volume V. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, IVTarreh 11, 1913 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 




THE LADIES' DORMITORY 

This building- was erected in 1905, and is a building- of beautiful proportions. In addition to rooms which will 
accommodate forty-live students, there are a society hall, a dining- hall, a well equipped kitchen, and a laundry. 



Visits In Chapel 

On last Wednesday morning the 
students at the chapel service were 
favcied by a talk from Rev. Nichol- 
son, who is holding the evangelistic 
services in our town in the large 
tabernacle built for thesu meetings on 
Main Street. Mr. Nicholson made a 
very short but impressive adJress to 
the student body, presenting the need 
of living a Christian life, as he has 
seen it through his own experience. 
Mr. Raymond Hemminger, who leads 
the singing in the tabernacle meet- 
ings, sang a beautiful solo, accom- 
panied by Mr. Gordon Johnson. 

The evangelistic meetings of the 
united churches of town, led by Mr. 
Nicholson and Mr. Hemminger, have 
been continuing for one week and will 
probably last two weeks longer. Im- 
mense crowds of 1200 to 1500 attend 



every evening session an J a great and 
good work is certainly being done 
there. The students are urged to at- 
tend as many of ihein as possible. 

Another visit was made at Lebanon 
Valley by Dr. Sehell, President of 
York College, Nebraska He made 
a pleasing address to the students in 
chapel, also. Everyone was p!eas?d 
to meet this representative from one 
of our sister U. B. Colleges. 



L. V. 32--Delaware 26 

In a great game last Wednesday 
Lebanon Valley defeated Delaware 
on their own ficcr by the score 32-26. 

The first half ended with the score 
22-14 in favor of Delaware. Delaware 
was strong and it seemed like a sure 
victory. 

In the second half Lebanon Valley 
came back strong and outplayed their 



opponents. Delaware's team work 
was not so strong in this half and 
consequently only four points were 
scored. 

Strickier and Dearolf starred. 
This duo scored all the points. 
Strickier had eight goals and four 
fouls to his credit while Dearolf had 
six goals. The line up: 

L. V. DELAWARE 

Strickier forward Thomas 

Dearolf forward Fackler 

VonBereghy center Wills, McNead 

Schmidt guard Doherty 

Larew guard Sandon 

Goals from field, Thomas, 1; 
McNeal, 1; Lacklen 2; Wills, 5; 
Doherly, 1; Strickier, 8; Dearolf, 6. 
Goals from, fouls Thomas, 4; Strick- 
ier 4,; timt of halves, 20 minutes; 
referee Griffin of Swathmore. 



COLL EG E NEWS 



College fieuis 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 
CLARA HORN, '13 

Athletics 

IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Assistant 
PHILO STATTON '15 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 



Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

"Never put off until tomorrow 
what you can do today," is a saying 
which all of us would do well to take 
as a motto. The trouble with most of 
us is that we reverse the motto to read 
"Never do today what you can put off 
until tomorrow." The latter, un- 
fortunately, seems to be the mere 
popular. How many of us are con- 
stantly saving, "I'll let that go until 
tomorrow?" Tomorrow comes, but 
the thing that should have been done 
yesterday is again left undone, and 
in most cases is never dene. 

School and "college are the places 
where the habits which follow us all 
our lives are formed. It is at these 
places that we should be particular to 
frrm correct and useful ones. How 
often do we hear people say. I don't 
believe I'll t o to lab. today," or "I 
have an hour tomorrow to read that 
reference." There may be an houi 
tomonow, but if an experiment could 
be done or a reference read just as 
easily today; why not do it today? 
That hour tomorrow can be enjoyed 



just as much tomorrow as it would 
have been today, and more so, because 
the knowledge of an undone duty 
would not be on our minds. 

Many times in life there are duties 
which must be done. If the person 
whose work it is to perform these 
duties neglects them, someone will 
have to do them. Does it seem fair 
to make other people do your work in 
addition to their own? Most of us 
care very little to do the work of an- 
other, yet at the same time we are 
willing to let others do what we 
should have done. It is in cases like 
this that opportunities which should 
have be*m ours go to others. If when 
opportunity comes knocking at our 
door, we neglect to open it, or let 
someone else do it, it never again re- 
turns, and we can only regret our 
actions. The man who is successful 
in life is the one who does his work 
at the proper time, never depends 
on others to do it, and when his op- 
portunity comes recognises it, and 
is ready to take it. 

The motto, "Clever put off until 
tomorrow, what you can do today," 
will make any life successful. But 
for the one who does not adhere to it, 
there is just one thing to remember, 
and that is; Your tomorrow may 
never come. 



Y. W. C. A. 



Notice Subscribers 

The business manager requests 
that all overdue subscriptions be 
promptly paid. Examine the label 
on your copy and see when your credit 
has expired and come across with 
the coin. 



The dormitory girls of the Fresh- 
man class, Misses Daugherty, Heintz- 
elman and Mathias conducted the 
meeting on Sunday, March 9. 

They chose for their subject "The 
American Indian." 

The following questions were asked ; 
What are the needs? Is it worth 
While? and What can I do? 

In answer to the first, Miss Bessie 
Brown says, "the great hope is in the 
children. We could have hundreds of 
them in school if there were room and 
money for their support. They are 
dissatisfied with their own religion 
" and ready for something better. What 
more is needed? Nothing but conse- 
crated workers and consecrated 
money." 

That it is worth while is seen in 
the following statement "men and 
women who were heathen in their 
thought and faith, drunkards and 
gamblers in their daily • living are 
now fine, upright, industrious people 
and no longer a ' problem. ' The power 
of the Gospel to uplift and transform 
quickly and effectively is nowhere 
more manifest. " 

To the last question, there are 
many answere, "I can inform myself 
of the work of our own denomination 
among the Indians;" "I can contrib- 
ute to its support by my gifts and my 
prayers and by spreading the interest 
in and information of its work;" "I 
can consider {whether I may be cailed 
to devote my talent to this spesial 
field of work" 



SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 



Enclosed please find One Dollar for College News subscrip- 
tion. Send News to following address: 



Name 



Street 



City 



State 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 



CLIONIAN 
Violin solo, Ruth E. Engle; paper, 
Status of Women in Barbarous Ages, 
Ruth V. Engle; Saint Patrick, Irene 
Hershey; Reading, Maud Baker; Need 
and Value Y. W. C. A. in Col- 
leges, Florence Clippinger; Piano 
solo, Ruth Whiskeyman; Olive Branch, 
Elta Weaver. 

KALOZETEAN 
Current events, Elmer Kirkpatrick; 
Oration, Mason Long; Piano solo, 
Luther Miller; Debate - Resolved : 
That a Convention should be called 
for the purpose of adopting a new 
constitution for the Commonwealth of 
Penna. Affirmative, C. Y. Ulrich, 
David Young. Negative, Geo. Will- 
iams. Verling Jamison; Examiner, 
Editor, Chorus, society. 

PHILOKOSMIAN 
Current events P. C. Hoffman ; Our 
New President, D. L. Reddick ; De- 
bate - Resolved, That the United 
States Should Intervene in the Mexi- 
can Revolution. Affirmative, H. 
Heintzleman, Ralph Stickell. Nega- 
tive, Clayton Juse, John Lerew ; 
Impromptu, L. R. Klinger; Living 
Thoughts. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Mr. L. B. Harnish, '14 had charge 
of the meeting Sunday. He took for 
, his theme: "The Empty House," and 
read foi the Ipsson Matt. 12, 22 to 33, 
also 43 to 46. The lesson which Mr. 
Harnish brought to us was a very 
practical one, indeed. He compared 
our heart the dwelling place of the 
spirit to a dwelling house, showing 
clearly that we cannot serve both God 
and mammon, for both cannot dwell 
together in the same heart; either 
God must have full possession, or the 
devil will have. 

Then, too/the human heart differs 
from a dwelling house in this respect, 
that it cannot remain empty. We 
must serve one, and one only ; and if our 
work does not show forth His praise, 
J t is easily seen who is the tenant of 
the soul. If the innermost chambers 



are all filled with the Spirit, the evil 
one can find no abiding place, and 
cannot remain therein to open the way 
into every temptation. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



Prohibition League 

The Prohibition League of L. V. C. 
held a meeting on Friday afternoon, 
Feb. 28 Mr. Charles U. Young, a 
Prohibition worker, was present to 
give some suggestions concerning the 
work of the League. Several com- 
mittees were appointed to look after 
the work of the league. One of 
these is to arrange for a meeting the 
purpose of which is to arouse enthu- 
siasm for the local contest. The 
local oratorical contest will be held 
April 1st. 



Muhlenburg 48— L- V. 26 

Lebanon Valley closed its basket 
ball season on Saturday night with a 
defeat administered by Muhlenburg to 
the tune of 48-26. The visitors put 
up a fast exhibition and their team 



Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

vCebanon Galley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
SRev. S. 2?. Sossarct, ZPrest'cieni 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet ice Cream 



AT 



USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 



$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2-50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

%, SCHOOL of \\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, IM.Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



work was brilliant at all stages of the 
game. They play a fast game. 

On the other hand Lebanon Valley 
played a very poor game. The boys 
did not use their heads and there was 
an utter lack of team work. No one 
starred, although at times a basket 
more or less spectacular was caged. 

The first half ended with the score 
28-7 in Muhlenburg's favor. In the 
second half Lebanon Valley took a 
brace and played a stronger game. 
The final score stood 48 -26. The line 
up : 

L. V. MUHLENBURG 
Strickler forward Copley, 

(Affterbak) 

Dearolf forward Hubbard 

Miller center Riter 

Schmidt guard Vieealnd 

Larew guard Loser 

(Snavely) (Leisey, Copl.ey) 

Field goals— Strickler, 3; Dearolf; 
Miller, 3; Schmidt; Hubbard, 7: 
Copley, ?; Ritter, 2; Vreeland, 5; 
Leisey. Foul goals — Strickler, 2; 
Dearolf, 4; Hubbard. 2 Vreeland 10. 
Refree, Haddow. Time of halves, ? 
20 minutes. 




Items of Interest 



Mrs. Lawrence Keister visited at 
the home of Mrs. Mills. 

The Clionian Literary Society has 
postponed their St. Patrick'3 party 
on account of the services in town. 
The party will be given sometime 
after the Easter vacation. 

John Lyter, '14, and Ivan Ressler, 
'13, visited Mr. Harry Mathews, of 
Horshey. 

The Easter vacation will begin 
March 18th, at noon and close March 
25th at noon. 

Do not forget the Star Course, March 
25th, Emily Waterman Concert Com- 
pany. 

The Men's Glee Club will give 
their home concert, April 1, 1913. 

Miss Cora Baker, Philadelphia, 
spent the week end with her sister, 
Miss Maud Baker. 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 



East Main St 



ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at 

GOLLAM'S 

Quantity ' ✓ ✓ Quality 
Main Street 



"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality, 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment, 
Catalogue Free, 

A, G. SPALDING L BROS, 

26430 Nassau St. 25 W. 42dSt., NEW YORK 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS 1 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Fubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa, 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 
I f. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, Pa 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO' 
LATES, ALWAYS FFESH 

W, Main St. Annville, Pa, 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



A RULE 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



• ; Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Banleen 
'•that the teacher who rails against Teachers' 
Agencies either lias been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
ergy of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing positions. 

Every year since 1905 we have been in need of 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school work. 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

P. L, MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust B'.dg., Harrisburg, Pa.U5 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COLLEGE flE v -S 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE * 



Volume V. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, April 1, 1913 



No. 17 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annvilie. Pa., under the act of March 3. i*7Q 




Men's Glee Club Will Give Concert Here "Thursday 



St. Patrick's Party 

The annual St. Patrick's party 
was given by the Clionian Literary 
Society, Friday evening, March 28th. 
The party had been postponed to 
this late date on account of the 
^icholson-Hemminger meetings in 
town. 

To all outward appearances the 



"Irish" idea was carried out but the 
underlying spirit was "April Fool." 
Some of our friends carried the 
"joke" too far for the cakes were 
taken and not returned. 

The parlors and dining hall were 
very beautifully and tastefully deco- 
rated in green crepe paper, sham- 
rocks, hats, pipes and snakes, the 



latter however, only paper. The 
Blarney stone was in evidence. 

All the games carried the April 
Fool idea and they were received in 
the same spirit of fun as planned. 
Prizes were given to the most suc- 
cessful. 

The refreshments, pistachie ice 
cream, "substitute" cakes and mints 
were served in the dining hall. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fleuis 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 

CLARA HORN, '13 

Athletics 
IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Assistant 

PHILO STATTON '15 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

to all 

other matter to Room — , Adminis- 
tration Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

A man may usually be known by 
the company he keeps, whether it be 
of men or of books; for there is a 
companionship in both. It is how- 
ever the importance of the latter 
which is not sufficiently recognized. 
"Tell me what you read and I will 
tell you what you .are." 

A good book is the best of friends, 
never changing ,ever the same. It 
is the most lasting product of human 
endeavor. Buildings will irumble 
into dust, statues decay and the 
work of our hands vanish away, but 
the thoughts of the author's mind 
will be as pure and fresh and clear 
today as in that remote past, ages 
ago, when they first passed through 
the human mind. The only effect of 
time has been to sift and pick out 
the really unworthy for nothing but 
the good in literature can really 
survive. 

Books are a common ground for 
friendship. "Men can think, feel, and 
sympathize with each other through 
their favorite author." How often 
men discover a love for each other in 
a mutual admiration for an author 
or piece of literature. AVould there 
not be wisdom in such a proverb, 



of 

Cfbatum Halleg (Mini? 
rrqurata thp hmwr of gaur prtanu? at its 
utyirty-stxth, Amttwraarij iExerrxspa 
Jffrihay turning April 4th 1913 
at Btven fnrtg-ftup 
lutgl? (Etittafntatory of HUtstr 
Anmrillr, Pa. 



"Love me, love my book"? Books 
become our companions and their 
characters, our friends. What pleas- 
ure to dwell for a space in the dream- 
world of our acquaintances of books 
together with a group of friends! 
The book is a living voice. Inspira- 
tion, sympathy and ambition are 
bred by a knowledge of the greatest 
men and women of books. 

What a privilege to pass as an in- 
timate friend through his experiences 
with Jean Valjean; to have been an 
acquaintance of Colonel Newcomb; 
to have seen the innermost life of an 
Arthur Pendennis, or to have come 
in contact with a Dorothea Brooks! 
Great indeed are the opportunities in 
fiction. 

But how much greater are the pos- 
sibilities of biography. The records 
of the lives of great and good men 
influence our actions, inspire our 
hearts with hope and put before our 
eyes great examples. Biography pre- 
sents and illustrates the possibilities 
and capabilities of human energies, 
refreshing hope, encouraging spirits 
and giving new strength, courage 
and faith. 

To see and study the lives of our 
greatest men is to bring insDiration 
in failure and in victory by their ex- 
amples. And from even the hum- 
blest life we can get much. Goethe 
has eaid that there is no man so 
commonplace that a wise man can 
not learn from him. Whatever re- 
lates to the living of men. is full of 
interest, instruction and inspiration. 

And at the head of all these 
hooks stands the Book of Books. 
What strength, what nower, what 
comfort, what wisdom, what Guid- 
ance, what assurance has been civen 
to mankind through its naees. Tt 
would indeed be difficult to uud?r- 
estimate its influence throughout the 



ages. With Wordsworth of all 
books it can be said: 

"Books, we know, 
Are a substantial world both pure 

and good, 
Round which, with tendrils strong 

as flesh and blood, 
Our pastime and our happiness can 

grow." 




Rev. I. E. Runk, '99, pastor of 
First U. B. church, Harrisburg, ad- 
dressed the Men's Adult Bible Class 
of the U. B. Sunday school on Sun- 
day evening. 

'00. Reba Lehman is visiting her 
parents, Dr. and Mrs. Lehman. 

'08. Mr. Guyer, a senior at the 
International Y. M. C. A. Training ' 
School, Springfield, Mass, spent Sat- 
urday here. 

'09. Walter Spessard has given up 
law practice and is now employed in 
the First National Bank of Hagers- 
town, Md. 

'07. William E. Herr is visiting 
his parents in town. 

The Tyrone Biological Laboratory 
is greatly indebted to Mr. J. Edward 
Marshall, '11, for a set of three 
hundred and fifty Histological slides 
prepared at the University of Penn- 
sylvania Medical College, where Mr. 
Marshall has been a student since 
his graduation at Lebanon Valley. 

Professor H. Oldham, for eight 
years the director of the Conserva- 
tory of Music, is at present a resi- 
dent of Clearfield, South Dakota, 
where he is postmaster. 



COL LE G E NEWS 



SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 



Enclosed please find One Dollar for College News subscrip- 
tion. Send News to following address: 



Name 



Street 



City 



State 



GO TO IT BOYS 



The Visit of Prof. Shannon 

The students of the college were 
greatly favored by the lecture course 
of Professor Shannon, a representa- 
tive of the World's Purity Congress. 
The lectures began on Thursday and 
extended to Sunday with three lec- 
tures a day, one to men, one to la- 
ies and one to a mixed audience. 

Professor Shannon is a very inter- 
esting speaker and is exceedingly 
capable in his line of work, having 
been for years a teacher of Biology 
He is sent out by the Purity Con- 
gress to address colleges, and has 
spoken to universities and colleges 
all over the land. His lectures touch 
the subjects of heredity, perfection 
in manhood and womanhood and 
questions of a vital social and mora' 
nature. 

On Sunday afternbon Mr. Shan- 
non spoke to the Y. M. and the Y. 
W. C. A. Among the girls he or- 
ganized a White Shield Society of 
more than twenty members, while 
among the boys he organized a 
White Cross Society of forty-seven 
members. 

It is to be regretted that more of 
the students would not avail them- 
selves of the opcrtunity of hearing 
these splendid lectures. Any stu- 
dents wishing to join these organiza- 
tions can secure cards of membership 
from Miss Esta Wareheim or Mr. 
Russel . Weidler. 



Star Course 

The last number of the Star 
Course, given under the auspices of 
the Y. W. and Y. M. C. A.'s of the 
college, was rendered on Tuesday 
night, March 25. 



The Emily Waterman Company 
was one of the best of the entertain- 
ments given this year. Music and 
readings were received with great 
applause. 

The associations wish to thank 
the students and the people of the 
town for their patronage. 



Clio. Officers for Spring Term 

President, Edna E. Yarkers; vice- 
president, Sara Zimmerman; record- 
ing secretary, Belle Orris; corres- 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 
ANNVILLE, PA. 

jCebcinon 2/alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group Systou. 

Special Facilities in Cheniistt y 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Halt are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

' m Write for catalogue 
S&ev. S. 0. Sossard, SPresictent 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER. W. Main St. 

$100 Typewriter $32.50 

Rebuilt in a manner to be as good 
as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk, Mgr. 
Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

SCHOOL of V\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, IM.Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



ponding secretary, ; 

treasurer, Josephine Urich; pianist, 
Velma Heindel; recorder, Katherine 
Eachman; critic, Edith Lehman; 
chaplain, CVara Horn; editor, Jo- 
sephine Mathias; judges, Misses 
Daugherty and Heintzelman. 



Athletic Notes 

The following persons have paid 

their subscriptions to either Treas- 
urer Weaver or Leray B. Harnish. 
The amounts paid are set opposite 
the names. 

G. A. Richie $5 00 

H. E. Snavely 3 00 

D. L. Reddick 2 00 

H. A. Denlinger 5 00 

Robert Hartz 5 00 

G. O. Brubaker \ . . 3 00 

L. I. Leister 1 00 

Clara Horn 3 00 

L. B. Harnish 5 00 

C. H. M:Cann 2 00 

I. H. Albright, Jr 2 00 

Ethel Houser 5 00 

C. E. Brenneman .......... 2 00 

J. Leininger ........ 1 5 00 

C. Curry . . '. . 5 00 

Elizabeth Rechard ......... 5 00 

Tom Lyter ..... 3 00 - 

John Lyter . .~. ..... . . 3 00 

Mendez 1 00 

Arnold 1 00 

Prof. S. O. Grimm i 5 00 

Hope Renn 3 00 

Josephine Mathias 1 00 

R. M. Weidler 2 00 

Viola Gruber 1 00 

Dr. G. D. Gossard 5 00 

S. H. Heintzelman 5 00 

Velma Heindel 3 00 

Russell Hoffer 3 00 

Mary Daugherty 1 00 

Edward H. Smith 5 00 

Philo A. Statton 5 00 

Geo. A. Haverstock 2 00 

Geo. W. Hallman 1 00 

L. A. Rodes 5 00 

W. E. Cannoles 1 00 

Wm. E. Carl 5 00 

Mae Meyer 5 00 

Ruth E. Engle 5 00 

Ruth V Enele 5 00 

Paul Bowman 5' 00 

Geo. A. Williams 5 00 

D. E. Zimmerman ......... 5 00 

Helen E. Brightbill 5 00 

Blanche Risser . 3 00 

F. Stengle : l 00 . 

Landis. Edgar l 00 

J. O. Jones l 00 

Prof. H. E. Wanner 10 00 

John H. Ness .' 5 00 

A. D. Medsffer 1 00 

H. K. Wrightstone 1 00 

Luther Miller 5 00 

Edna Yarkers 2 00 

R. B. McClure 1 00 

David J. Evans 3 00 

Total paid $188 00 

Respectfully submitted, 

Leray B. Harnish, 

Sec. Exec. Board of L. V. C. A. A. 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at 

GOLLAM'S 

Quantity ✓ ✓ / Quality 
Main Street 



"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING L BROS. 

26-130 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YORK 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoea 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams t 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 
ti. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear E«gle Hotel Annville, Pa 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



\V. Main- St. 



Annville. Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO* 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St. Annville, Pa, 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

' Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAH!~RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at ' 4 Ussy's" 

OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



A RULE 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



"Put this down as a rule." says Dr. Bardeen 
' that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
ergj of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing positiens. 

Every year since 1905 we have been in need of 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near, 
ly every grade of public and private school war*' 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



) 



KALOZETEAN ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 

COIi^GE HEWS 

LEBANON 9/ lLEY COLLEGE 

Volume V. Annville, PsL, Tuesday, April 8, 1913 fio. 18 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annvilie, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



KALO SOCIETY, THIRTY-SIX YEARS 
OLD, OBSERVES ANNIVERSARY AND 
GIVES REGEPTION TO MANY GUESTS 



On b'liday evening, April 4th, the 
Kaiczeteuii i-iteraiy bociety cele- 
brated us tiiiity-biAtli auaiveifaary. 
The literary exerci&ea, neiil ia tne 
Engle Conservatory oi Music, were 
ol a very ni^n order, and reached the 
Lijh standard set pre\iously on sim- 
ilar occasions. The rendition of each 
number was a success in the true 
sense of the word, and showed the 
value of the literary training re- 
ceived in the society. 

The decorations in ihe college 
chapel were made all the more 
charming by their simplicity. A 
large Kalozetean banner was the fea- 
ture of the decorations. Palms and 
pennants completed a most tasteful 
scheme. Keim's orchestra, of Leba- 
non, furnished excellent music for 
the occasion. 

The following program was ren- 
dered: 

March, Spiri of Independence, Abe 
Holzman; Invocation, Rev. J. A. Ly- 
ter, '85; overture, Lustspiel, Keler- 
Bela, Op. 73; President's Address, 
George A. Williams; Oration, The 
Menace of Deforestation, Boaz G. 
Light; piano solo, Original Composi- 
tion, M. Luther Miller; reading, Sam 
Weller as Witness, from the "Pick- 
wick Papers," by Dickens, Victor M. 
Heffelfinger; essay, Did Taft Make 
Good? Ivan L. Ressler; Baritone solo, 
Selected, Harry Edwin Ulrich; ora- 
tion, Peace Among Perplexities, 
Charles Y. Ulrich; intermezza, April 
Moods, Max C. Eugene. 

The President's Address by George 
A. Williams, '13, was very strong 
both from the literary and oratorical 
standpoints. Mr. Williams, who took 
first prize in the Junior Oratorical 
Contest last year upheld his reputa- 
tion as an orator. 

Boas G. Light, '13, in delivering 
his oration "The Menace of Defores- 
tation," presented his theme very 
vividly, and proved a great credit to 
himself and his society. 

The large audience was delighed 
with the piano solo, an original 




GEORGE A. WILLIAMS 



composition by M. Luther Miller, '15. 
An encore was also well received. 

Victor H. Heffelfinger, '16,' as the 
reader of the evering, very ably por- 
trayed "Sam Weller as Witness," 
from the "Pickwick Papers," by 
Dickens. 

The essay, "Did Taft Make Good?" 
by Ivan L. Ressler, '13, was an ex- 
cellent appreciation of the ex-presi- 
dent's achievements. 

Harry E. Ulrich, '13, then render- 
ed a baritone solo, "On the Road to 
Mandalay." The encore is the best 
evidence of the success of this num- 
ber. Miss Mary Pastor served as ac- 
companist. 

The oration "Peace Among Per- 
plexities," was very well handled. 
Mr. Ulrich's delivery was pleasing 
and his work reflected great credit 
on the organization which he repre- 
sented. 

A selection by the orchestra con- 
cluded the program. The audience 
then attended the reception given in 
the Kalo Halls, appropriately deco- 
rated for the occasion. Delicious re- 
freshments were served, while the 



orchestra rendered a very pleasing 
concert. 

The chairmen of the various com- 
mittees were as follows: ben. 
George A. Williams, '13; entertain- 
ment, Carl F. Schmidt, '14; decora- 
tions, H. H. Charkon, '14; refresh- 
ment, H. M. Bender, '15. 



PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS. 

Ladies and Gentlemen. 

it is our sincere pleasure and privi- 
lege to welcome you most cordially 
to the thirty-sixth anniversary ex- 
ercises of the Kalozeteau Literary 
Society. We appreciate beyond 
measure the interest which your 
presence here indicates. 

Some of you, doubtless are attract- 
ed as critics of literary work. Oth- 
ers are tonight expressing the natur- 
al appreciation of students and 
friends of Lebanon Valley College. 
Then there are those who for many 
years have watched our progress 
with increasingly devoted interest. 
These "lovers of the beautiful," by 
whom the principles of Kalozetean 
have been handed down to us, revisit 
the scenes of events now cherished 
in grateful memory and with keen 
delight, renew in spirit the fraternal 
associations and fellowships of their 
student days. 

The anniversary of any institution 
is naturally concomitant with a 
period of thought, reflection, and 
meditation. Hence it is fitting for 
us to consider for a short time this 
evening the relation of sober intel- 
lectual work to our lives. 

Some English writer has recorded 
that the cells in the gray matter of 
the brain are numerous enough to 
hold over three billion different 
ideas. It would take seventy years 
of life, with the brain working in 
the accumulation of ideas without in- 
termission, to fill the cells at the 
rate of five thousand ideas an hour. 
If this Englishman was right, most 
of us still have a few brain cells un- 
occupied and for rent. Vast as is 



COLLEGE NEWS 



the power of thought residing in the 
brain, that wonderful organ when 
removed from its receptacle and sub- 
jected to chemical analysis resolves 
itself into such common materials 
as phosphorus and fat. No wonder 
that Hamlet inquires, "What is this 
quintescence of dust?" It is for the 
brain to think and to evolve thought 
by the thinking, and it is the part of 
physical energy to make right think- 
ing effective in deed. 

"We live in deeds not years; in 

thoughts, not breaths; 
In feelings, not in -figures on a dial. 
We should count time by heart 

throbs. He most lives 
Who thinks most, feels the noblest, 

acts the best." 

Were it not for thought, existence 
itself would be a blank. "Cogito 
ergo sum, ' wro.e Descartes. "1 think, 
therefore I am." It is to be regretted 
that very many persons are so deep- 
ly involved in the rushing, strenu- 
ous life of the present commercial 
age that they do not take time to 
think. Says James Freeman Clarke: 
"The chief intellectual difference be- 
tween men is that some think and 
others do not; but thinking is hard 
work, pel-haps the hardest that is 
done on the surface of the planet." 
Good thoughts are said to be no bet- 
ter than good dreams unless they be 
put in action. They must work out 
through the activity of worthy men. 
A negative virtue is not vital; it 
touches nothing with striking force. 

"For if otfr virtues ' 
Did not go forth of us, 'twere all 
alike 

As if we had them not." 

■ i , 

Our thoughts determine the prin- 
ciples which are to govern our con- 
duct, the ideals toward which we 
must strive in order to develop a 
beautiful character. However, in 
this intensely utilitarian age, many 
are controlled by prejudice, impulse, 
or passion, rather than by deep set- 
tled convictions of right and wrong, 
of duty and justice. 

The growing tendency to magnify 
the value of mere material prosperity 
is crowding from the mind all high- 
er aspirations. 

That the tendency of modern edu- 
cational' effort is in the direction of 
money-seeking and money-worships, 
cannot be denied. Every new study 
that is forced into an already over- 
crowded curriculum has behind it 
the almost resistless force of pure 
commercialism. 

Sometime honored studies that 
once had effect in rightly stimulat- 
ing the imagination, cultivating the 
sensibilities, refining the taste, 
quickening the conscience, strength- 
ening a right power of will; and 
touching with vivifying force the 
whole intellectual being — ih' a word 
forming CHARACTER which Emer- 



son says is the highest word at 
which philosophy has arrived — have 
been crowded into an unimportant 
place in the recitation program or 
inconsiderately forced out of it alto- 
getner. There are some things prized 
by the unthinking that are secured 
a i cou feieat a cost. The history of 
nations shows that national per- 
petuity is not based upon the accu- 
mulation of wealth or the develop- 
ment 01 vast material resources. 

Nevertheless commercialism marks 
mucn ui our legislation. Our law 
maKbi. occupy their time by the con- 
sideration ot measures entirely and 
superncial in nature. Bills which 
tend toward the improvement of the 
human race are eitner pushed aside 
or hurried through and then forgot- 
ten. 

Political reformers and economists 
have made us sufficiently acquainted 
with dangers that confront the Re- 
public in the shape of graft, politi- 
cal corruption, and "special inter- 
est," but we seldom hear a word from 
tn'em about the evil which disrupts 
tamily ties and thus strikes at the 
very roots of society> and which, if 
unchecked, will prove far more dis- 
astrous to our national life than all 
tne other evils so frequently forced 
on our attention. 

in the midst of the complexity of 
modern money-making agencies, with 
the cry for more men to make more 
money, with the insistent request 
that our educational institutions 
rush their inmates out into the mad- 
dening whirl of business prepared to 
INCREASE its velocity, the value of 
things intellectual has been minimiz- 
ed. 

Even at college life has become so 
complex that there is great danger 
of superficiality. In these days there 
are so many sports, amusements, 
frolics, novels, flighty music that 
they may be said to keep the mind 
from intellectual work, such a per- 
sistency in frivolity and fun that the 
mind is not given to healthy exer- 
cise. Much of the reading done today 
hardly reaches the mind before it is 
swept away by some new considera- 
tion. Interest is given now to this 
affair, now to that association until 
one's energies are dissipated over so 
much space that no real progress is 
made in any direction. 

A life in order to be strong and 
safe and useful must be actuated by 
an ideal and impelled by controlling 
principles of conduct in the direction 
of that ideal in spite of inclination, 
mood, convenience, circumstance, 
popular approval or disapproval. 

The society, the birthday of which 
we celebrate tonight has ever been 
inspired by the ideal suggested in 
its name — Kalozetean, lovers of the 
beautiful. The founders of the or- 
ganization realized that the forma- 
tion of a beautiful character is im- 
possible without hardship and dif- 
ficulty. Hence, our ennobling motto, 
"Palma non sine pulvere," no palms 



without dust, no genuine success 
without sacrifice. The contest is 
generally between power on one side 
and principle on the other. The his- 
tory of the race is full of instances 
where men and women sacrificed 
their lives by unswerving fidelity to 
a principle or a cause. 

The truly beautiful character re- 
sults from a just regard for others, 
both natural and moral,. Ages ago, 
we are told that a monk cut into 
the wall of his lonely cell "Vivendum 
in serviendo," meaning that true liv- 
ing consists in serving others. There 
are persons well content to govern 
their actions by what is expedient. 
The end to which they direct their 
efforts is the success that inures to 
their personal profit. These are not 
great souls, for Aristotle says "Al- 
ways to be hunting after the profit- 
able ill agrees with great and free- 
born souls." "The noblest question 
in the world," wrote Franklin, is, 
"What good may I do in it?" Bacon 
expressed a great truth when he 
said, "Power to do good is the lawful 
end of aspiring." 

These are some of the prin- 
ciples by which we have been en- 
abled to realize the true meaning 
or Kalozetean. We urge all of you 
to join with us in commemorating 
the introduction ot the ideals which 
have guided our organization for 
thirty-six years, and we hope that 
this anniversary will be a stepping- 
stone not only to a better Kalozetean 
but also to the increased lustre of 
the fair name of Lebanon Valley. 

k The Menace of Deforestation 

America! the joy and pride of 
every man and woman who has the 
fortune to be red and nourished 
on her soil! A country whose broad 
expanse extends from the home of 
the spruce and fir in the north to the 
great forests of the cypress and 
palm in the south; and whose east- 
ern and western shores are washed 
by the turbulent waves of the white 
created sea. Our America! which is 
honored and esteemed by all na- 
tions throughout the world. But all 
this vast extent of territory possess- 
ed by us was not obtained in a 
single bound. For with a great deal 
of reverence we look back to the 
times when our forefathers struggled, 
Yea sacrificed their lives to build 
up this country of freedom and lib- 
erty which we, their posterity, now 
enjoy. Yet not withstanding the 
freedom and happiness that obtains 
throughout our nation, the heritage 
of our ancestors, we must admit 
that our present wealth and power 
are due to the development of the 
natural resources of the country. 
That we were recognized as a great 
and powerful country only when our 
soils began to yield their crops, when 
the minerals of thei interior of the 
earth were made of use to man, and 
when the forest and its products 



COLLEGE NEWS 



were seen to be indispensable to the 
progress and the well-Deing of our 
country. if 

Let us too a moment observe of 
what importance and value the for- 
est is to our country,! and how all 
our other natural resources are de- 
pendent on it! The geologist has 
shown that the forest is needed to 
check the great winds on our broad 
western plains. That wherever de- 
forestation has taken place erosion 
lias washed all of the rich soil from 
our once fertile lands. That wher- 
ever the forests have been removed 
from the sources of our rivers, the 
flow of the once gentle stream is 
changed for a season into a wild and 
restless year, there remains only a 
small stream thatl slowly winds its 
way along the bottom of the broad 
and barren bed of the river until it 
is finally lost in the sands. But not 
understanding this, our pioneer fa- 
thers were wasteful In cutting and 
careless in preserving our forests. 

However, the study of forestry has 
proven that the two great destruc- 
tive and excessive drains upon our 
timber lands are the devastating for- 
est fires, and the man with the wan- 
ton disregard for the future. Statis- 
tics show that every year an average 
of ten million acres of our best tim- 
ber lands are destroyed by fire, all 
on account of the reckless habits of 
the hunter and woodsman. Though 
the drain on our forests from timber 
destroyed by fire is great, it cannot 
be compared with the vast amount 
that is destroyed yearly by that in- 
dividual whose idea of developing 
the country is to cut off every stick 
of timber, and then leave a barren 
dssert I for the homemaker who 
comes in after him. A man such as 
this is. a curse to the country. We 
may with ease term him a poor 
American, since his care for the well 
being of this country is limited to 
his own country. Indeed he is not 
entitled to call himselfa decent citi- 
zen, if he does not try to do his part 
toward seeing that our national 
policies are shaped for the advan- 
tage of our children, and our chil- 
dren's children For our country we 
have faith to believe is only at the 
beginning of its growth. And un- 
less some means are found whereby 
this waste may be checked, our 
groves which were God's first tem- 
ples will in less than twenty-five 
years be ruthlessly brought to 
nought, and disaster in the commer- 
cial sphere will be inevitable and 
this means disaster to the whole 
country. 

Dr. 1. C. White, State Geologist of 
West Virginia, has well spoken when 
he declared that "Just as sure as the 
sun shines, and the sum of two and 
two make four, unless this insane 
riot of destruction and waste of our 
fuel resources which has character- 



ized the past century shall be speed 
ily ended, our industrial power and 
supremacy will, after a meteor-like 
existence, revert before the close of 
the present century, to those nations 
that conserve and prize at that prop- 
er value the priceless treasures of 
carbon." 

However upon closer observation, 
we discover that the real and under- 
lying cause of this awful waste of 
our forest products is due to the in- 




BOAZ G. LIGHT 



difference of the men whom we send 
to Congress to preserve our interests. 
Only too often have these men whom 
we have elected to represent us per- 
mitted themselves to be carried away 
from the problems of forest conser- 
vation on the wings of some local or 
merely temporary measure. Only too 
often have they used their influence 
to place the forest reserves in the 
hands of the individual states, thus 
making them an easier prey for the 
large monopolizing corporations. 

The time has come when we must 
root out of Congress, men who have 
only personal interest at heart. We 
must elect those men who will make 
a study of the national resources, 
their relation to social life and de- 
velopment, and their economy, which 
in future years will become the most 
important branch of social science: 
one which will overshadow most of 
the other branches now appearing 
all important. When the question 
of the suffrage of women, of tariff, 
of taxation, of coinage and currencv 
shall have sunk into the background, 
questions pertaining to the economy 
of resources which constitute and 
sustain the political, commercial and 
social powers of the nation, long 
neglected, will present themselves 
so vividly before our congressmen 
that they must claim attention. Our 
representatives must also remember 
that only those nations which devel- 
op their national resources economi- 
cally and avoid the waste of that 



which they produce, can maintain 
their power as a commercially inde- 
pendent nation. 

But however extravagant we may 
have been in the past, there is still 
some chance for retaining the forest 
and consequently our industrial su- 
premacy and independence, if we but 
rise out of the depths of ignorance 
and study more fully the needs of 
the tree. Indeed a faint ray of hope 
may be seen gleaming through this 
pending evil threatening our coun- 
try, and we need not be overcome 
with anxiety if we as true Ameri- 
cans help to instil into the minds of 
our fellow men the evil effects of the 
destructive forest fires, and if we 
place men at the head of our govern- 
ment who will prevent the devasta- 
tor from aroing over the rich portions 
of our virgin forests and leaving 
them a desert; men who will again 
reclaim our fertile lands that have 
been made barren by deforestation. 

Tj)>,en with joy we may behold the 
preen and beautiful forest as it 
waves over the hills and dales of our 
country, and view with the eyes of 
tbe ooet the tree as he sees it to be: 
"Most beauteous in thy prime, O 

giant oak! 
The s'orras of centuries have beat 

thy breast, 
Yet thy abnormal soul knew no un- 
rest, 

When earthquakes threatened and 

when thunders spoke. 
Man's insignificance of days and 

years 

Compared with thine, O friend 

should bid him pause, 
Ere. wantonly defying nature's laws. 
He fells to earth the giant whom he 

fears. 

Yes, fear strange forces, for in every 
vein 

Do snirit essence of the selfsame 
kind 

Which dwells in man. an essence un- 
defined, 

Yet quick with sentient life. On 

soni" high plain 
Long may earth claim thee, stately, 

beauteous tree, 
Then — hamadryad immortality." 



The New Staff 

Russell Weidler, '14, editor-in- 
chief; associate editors, Florence 
Mentz, '15, John Lyter, '14; depart- 
ment editors, Alumni, P. S. Strick- 
ler, '14; Music, G. F. Botts; Social. 
Esta Wareheim, '16; Athletics, P. A. 
Statton, '14. The new staff has as- 
sisted in the publication of this is- 
sue. They will take full charge 
next week. The best wishes of the 
old staff go with them. 



President G. D. Gossard, D.D., 
made the invocation at the com- 
mensement of the Carlisle Indian 
School on Thursday, April the third. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fteaus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Christian Associations 
of Lebanon Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

EDNA E. YARKERS, '13 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

EDITH LEHMAN, '13 
VICTOR MULHOLLEN, '13 

DEPARTMENT EDITORS 
Social 

CLARA HORN, '13 

Athletics 

IVAN L. RESSLER, '13 

General 

J. F. LEININGER, '13 
JOHN B. LYTER 'H 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON 'H 
Assistant 
PIIILO STATTON '15 

Subscription Price Sl.*K) per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communicat ions! 
to HARRY CHARLTON 'i4 all other 
matter to Room 22, Adminih 1a- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITORIAL. 

The editorial staff, whose names 
appear in this paper as such for the 
last time, take pleasure in resign 5 ng 
their work to the newly elect a 1 ; taff , 
hoping that their new tasks may be 
found pleasant and agreeable to 
them. As all good workmen, may 
they profit by the failures and mis- 
takes of their predecessors and "rise 
upon the stepping stones of 'our' 
dead selves, to higher things." 

As a last word, we, the editors, 
wish to thank those who have so 
faithfully helped us in the past year. 
With the words of kindly riticiom 
which have come to us, there came 
also that which was unjust. For 
both we feel a kind of appreciation, 
for this is the way of life. 

In all our tasks, sometimes ardu- 
ous, we felt a pleasure in serving our 
Alma Mater. Though the way was 
often rough and hard and though 
there have been those who looked 
unkindly at our efforts, still we 
know that these efforts were nol 
made in vain and the reward and 
comDensation comes in the knowl- 
edge that we have done our beet. 
And so we commit our task to the 
new staff, not reluctantly but gladly 
and wish for them a most successful 
and "ratifying year. 

The Reading 

A pleasing feature of the program 
was the reading given by Mr. Heffel- 
flneer, "Sam Weller as Witness," 
from the "P>ckwick Papers," by 
Difkens.. A synopsis of the story is 



as follows: Mr. Pickwick engaged 
Sam Weller as his servant and inno- 
cently asked Mrs. Bardell, the land- 
lady, if it would be a much greater 
expense to keep two people than one. 
Mrs. Bardell, supposing that this 
was a proposal of marriage, threw 
her arms about Mr. Pickwick's neck 
and swore never to leave him. 

In the Bardell suit for breach of 
promise which followed, Sam Weller 
was the principal witness for Mr. 




VICTOR M. HEFFELFINGER 



Pickwick. But as the judge ex- 
pressed it, "You are quite right, gen- 
tlemen, it's perfectly useless attempt- 
ing to get any evidence through the 
impenetrable stupidity of the wit- 
ness. I will not trouble the court 
by asking him any more questions," 
Sam said as little respecting Mr. 
Pickwick as possible. • Notwithstand- 
ing Sam's efforts the verdict was 
against Mr. Pickwick with seven 
hundred and ff y pounds damages. 

Mr. Heffelfinger deserves prer 4 
credit for his work. He presented 
his characters splendidly, especially 
Sam Weller. The attention of the 
audience was held throughout the 
reading. 



Did Taft Make Good ? 

Courage, simplicity, directness, 
and fideli y to high ideals were the 
chief characteristics of William How- 
ard Taft's administration of the 
Presidency of the United States. He 
was every inch a President. The 
duality of his patriotism is pure. If 
he was something less the political 
leader it was only that he might be 
President of all the people in the 
truest sense of the word. Whenever 
in our national life there has been 
need of a particular type of man for 
the chief magistracy that man has 
been forthcoming. The nation had 
need of a man of Mr. Taft's judicial 
temperament. He fulfilled his mis- 
sion, and if he suffered a trying po- 
litical defeat it was due to faithful 
performance of his duty and to the 



oft-proven inability of the people to 
appreciate a really great man until 
he has enabled them to get a per- 
spective on his personality and 
achievement. That President Taft 
has been great in defeat few will re- 
fuse to concede. Those who have en- 
joyed the advantage of close associa- 
tion with him, the opportunity of 
knowing his motives and ideals and 
of judging his achievements know he 
has been great throughout his ad- 
ministration. 

When President Taft was inauy- 
rated he was confronted with a dif- 
ficult and, in some respects, a thank- 
less task. An epoch of agitation 
was to be succeeded by an epoch of 
application. His it was to complete 
J he work of his predecessor, to per- 
form the painstaking and even tedi- 
ous finishing work on economic 
structures the framework of which 
had b^en erected and the glory 
cleaned by others. His it was to re- 
deem the lone-repeated promises of 
the Reunbliean party to revise the 
tariff. And his it was to correct evils, 
numerous, if erreat only in the aeerre- 
rate. which had been the inevitable 
concomitant of seven years' adminis- 
tration which had been as brilliant 
anrl dvnamic. as it was extravagant 
and unconscious of the details of ad- 
ministrative efficiency. And adding 
materially to the difficulties of his 
situation. Mr. Taft succeeded, not a 
Democratic administration whose 
defects miglit properly be empha- 
sized to make more obvious the im- 
portance of the reforms he effected, 
but that of a friend to whom he was 
under great obligation, an obligation 
which even in defeat he has never 
disregarded. 

As a political leader Mr. Taft 
faced the problem of a narty divided 
into irreconcilable factions whieh 
had been held toe-ether only by the 
consummate skill of one of the mos* 
astute nnljtioians in the nation's his- 
tory, hut one whose influence had 
tended constan+ly to make the con- 
servatives more conservative and the 
radicals more radical, while his 
methods had lent encouragement to 
those who were neither at heart, but 
who sought hv imitation to further 
their own nolitical ambitions. 

Out of this difficult and trvine sit- 
uation President Taft brought a bodv 
of legislation which in importance 
and eeneral excellence exceeds the 
record of anv four years in the na- 
tion's hietorv. He procured a tariff 
law the merits of which are becom- 
ing rlailv niore annarent and which, 
in addition to reducing rates in al- 
most everv schedule, instituted the 
svstem of mavimum pt\d minimum 
' 1 -- f5 ~s. imposed a tax on corpora*'-- 
favp free trade to the Philinpines. 
ereafed 1 snecial ens'oms court, and. 
above nil. created a tariff board, thus 
nroindin" the machinerv on which 
alone future accurate and equitable 



COLLEGE NEWS 



revision could be accomplished. 

The railway rate law of the pre- 
vious administration had proved in- 
effective in many respects. President 
Taft procured the enactment of a 
supplementary measure which cor- 
rected the defects of its predecessor, 
extended the authority of the In- 
terstate Commerce Commission over 
telephone and telegraph lines and ex- 
press companies and created a spe- 
cial commerce court which has re- 
duced the time required by shippers 
to gain remedy from offending rail- 
ways from two years to six months. 

President Taft procured legisla- 
tion establishing beyond peradven- 
t.ure the legality of the conservation 
-~Hcy, procuring adequate retur 
for the general public from coal, oil 
and mineral lands in this country 
and Alaska and from water power 
developed by river improvement, and 
vetoed every measure aimed at this 
important policy. 

Mr. Taft procured the establish- 
ment of postal savings banks and of 
a parcels post, overcoming in both 
instances a powerful and long suc- 
cessful opposition, and converted a 
postal deficit co-existent with the 
service into a small profit. He se- 
cured legislation to suppress the 
white slave traffic, to create a bu- 
reau of mines, a children's bureau, 
and to impose on employers an ade- 
quate liability for the injury of their 
emoloyes. 

The Taft administration enforced 
the anti-trust law and the anti-re- 
bate law, instituting and successful- 
lv conducing more prosecutions 
than any previous administrations 
bv two to one, substituting unrelent- 
ing lee-al prosecutions for inflamma- 
tory, fruitless vociferation, and com- 
pelling the dissolution of the most 
powerful trusts in the country. 

Devoting unremitting labor to 
nrohlpms of economy and efficiency 
President Taft converted a deficit of 
$58,000,000 which confronted him 
when he took office into a comfortable 
surplus, checking the long unbroken 
annual list of expenditures and ef- 
fecting an actual decrease. And fin- 
ally, he devised a budget system and 
pointed the wav whereby Congress, 
if it will, mav forestall the constant 
tendency to federal extravagance. 

In the conduct of the nation's for- 
eign relations President Taft earned 
the gratitude of all loyal Americans. 
Out of a delicate situation he 
achieved a treaty with Japan which 
insures amicable relations with that 
PTfia t power f or ma ny years to come. He 
gave far-reaching impetus to the 
cause of international arbitration, 
negotiating treaties with Great Brit- 
ain and with France which, even 
though they failed of approval by 
the Senate, still mark the way to- 
ward progress and are certain, be- 
cause of their inherent merit, ulti- 
ma f ely to be revived and ratified. 



With firmness and kindliness the 
influence of President Taft was ex- 
erted to discourage insurrection, pro- 
tect lives and property and promote 
peace in Central America, and re- 
sponsibility for the fact that even 
more in this direction has not been 
accomplished lies squarely at the 
door of the opposing party in the 
Senate. 

Throughout a neriod of insurrec- 
tion and revolution and strife in 




IVAN L. RESSLER 



Mexico, President Taft, with infinite 
forbearance in the face of the ut- 
most provocation, preserved tradi- 
tional friendship of this country for 
the Republic to the South, acting 
with determination and celerity 
when the revolutionary forces men- 
aced lives and property on this side 
of the border, but with unparalleled 
consideration and self-restraint when 
a more summary course would un- 
questionably have promoted his own 
political fortunes. 

Thus briefly may be summarized 
the concrete achievements of th^ 
Taft administration, achievements 
which are bound to endure and 
which as time goes on are certain to 
be more and more highly appreciated 
bv the American neople. which it is 
evident the public perceives even 
now far more clearly than it could 
during the strife and smoke of the 
recent three-sided political conflict. 

Of these administrative reforms. 
+he eorrpction of internal evils to 
which T have referred, comparatively 
little can he said. nor. preat as was 
the + ask. little will ever be known. 
Winning the support and confidence 
of men who. in a fever of reforrn and 
under a snell of some economi" nov- 
elfv or nolitical vawrv. have forgot- 
ten that their firs* dutv is to nerform 
the work for which they wpro an- 
nointed is a difficult, r«M»*". To reduce 
men in the exaltation which attends 
the following of a leader they re- 



gard as inspired to a realization of 
the fact that the performance of a 
humdrum routine duty is as essential 
to the government as the pursuit of 
some chimera of economic perfection 
is not spectacular and may engender 
undying and potent enmities, but. 
there are times when such duty fails 
to be executive, and upon no other 
chief executive has devolved the ne- 
cessity of so much work of this 
character. It has been done cour- 
ageously and unremittingly and the 
federal organization is an infinitely 
more efficient machine because of it. 

An appreciation of President 
Taft's administration may not be 
complete with an enumeration of its 
virtues and achievements. In the 
li^ht of the verdict last November it 
mav be pertinent to inquire wherein 
it failed, what were its faults? The 
nuestiou is easily answered. Aside 
from the difficulties of the unique 
conditions under which Mr. Taft as- 
sumed +he office, he was hampered 
nv certain characteristics which mil- 
itated against his political success. 
Wis lono- training as a jurist had 
rmnhapjzed his conception of that 
distinction which he believed should 
exist between the co-ordina f e 
branches of the government and in- 
snired in him a dread of undue in- 
terference bv the executive with the 
national legislature. It had filled 
him with a horror of rendering anv 
decision or taking anv step, even 
thon°"h +hev mif?bt be wbollv proper 
in themselves, for political effect, 
and finallv. it had imbued him with 
o e.aneention of the di^nitv of the 
Propidenc.v which made reouenant 
j»nvthjn°- that, savored of the methods 
of thp nress a.^cn^, 

Tn the lan*Hia°-e of trade. "We had 
fhp p-oods hut he didn't advertise." 
^rhiiQ tv>e n^onle had become accus- 
tomed to radically different methods 

T,ess concrete, more subtle, hut T 
venture to believe no 1 less potent in 
its power for srood. than any other 
feature of President Taft's adminis- 
tration, has been his unswerving 
fidelity to the Constitution and the 
law, a fidelity at times irritating to 
those seeking short-cuts to economic 
perfection, but a fidelity "based on 
time-honored traditions of the Amer- 
ican people and bound to appeal to 
their finer instincts when the cessa- 
tion of demagogue clamor affords 
them time and opportunity to reflect. 
No thought of personal popularity, 
no consideration of partisan welfare 
has ever deflected Mr. Taft's course 
in the slightest degree from his sin- 
cere conception of his oath of office 
to "preserve and protect, and defend 
the Constitution of the United 
States." He has kept the faith, and 
in the fullness of time even those 
who in their haste have censured 
him. will honor and respect him 
for it. 



COLL EG E NEWS 



PEACE AMONG PERPLEXITIES. 

1. The greatest lessons and most 
profound truths can be drawn from 
homely illustrations. A little fra- 
grant flower, a rippling stream, or 
a tiny bird have been taken as sub- 
jects for immortal thesis. In fact 
the greatest minds in literature have 
written about the simplest sur- 
roundings. There are more natures 
stirred by the simple poetry in the 
Scottish dialect of Burns, than by the 
literary forms in the neroic couplet 
of Dryden. More hearts beat in uni- 
son to "Home, Sweet Home" than to 
the classical strains of grand opera. 
More minds are turned to Christian- 
ity by the gentle Master's homely 
allusions to the sheep, the sparrow, 
the lilies of the field, than through 
profound dissertations on theology. 

2. Emerson has wisely intimat- 
ed that we are prone to consider the 
distant more wonderful than that 
which is daily in our view. So we 
read and rave about European scen- 
ery, the wonders of the deep or the 
grandeur of the Alps, and our eyes 
are dimmed and our vision blurred 
as we constantly rove over the hill 
mountains of our own state. Those 
who continually behold nothing, but 
the vast expanse of rolling plains or 
prairies, look on a scene, soon mo- 
notonous, how much more wondrous 
and beautiful is the mountain and 
valley landscape surrounding us and 
not many miles distant. To one who 
for the first time has ascended to 
the top of a mountain in which are 
embedded veins of black fuel and 
look into the valley beneath and be- 
hold a mining town, what a jumble of 
emotional thoughts, wrestle and tug 
and strive for the mastery in his 
mind. Here we have found our 
homely illustration — "the town in 
the valley." There far below lie sev- 
eral scores of houses, small in struc- 
ture, humble in appearance, with 
their spacious fertile gardens in the 
rear, and the shaded walks and 
dusty road along the front. Along 
the mountain sides we see the green 
expanse of evergreen and pine, brok- 
en by winding roadways leading 
across the mountains or to the min- 
ing shafts. 

-3. How very different from what 
one might have expected, why not 
build the houses along the mountain 
side where the sunshine plays in 
its intensest glory instead of in the 
valley where the shadows linger 
Ah! but that mountain side repre- 
sents the miner's scene of conflict, 
there are sunk the shafts to the 
depths of darkness, and danger and 
toil. There he labors and hazardous 
difficulties that humanity mi ?ht live, 
and when the day of toil and dan-.'er 
and hardship and dirt has ended the 
mines joyfully wends his way into 
the valley , beneath where he finds 
rest, and peace and security friends 
to greet him and a haven in which 
to restore his spent energies for the 
renewal on another day — the same 



story of dignified effort. The town 
represents perfect equilibrium, in- 
imity to the perplexities of the out- 
side world. Mountain around it, but 
unmindful of them, sheltered from 
storm, peaceful in its serenity. 

4. Can we not in this illustration 
strike the keynote to what is absent 
yet essential in our strenuous life 
viz. peace among perplexities. We 
have been educated to the spirit of 
work and development and progress 




CHARLES Y. ULRIGH 



until rest and meditation denote very 
little. We travel at a lightening rate 
of speed over land and water and 
through the air. The promoter and 
the money crazed, wring the sweat 
from the fathers and mothers and 
even children, through device, com- 
petition and invention and they work 
and work and work. We evolve 
thrones and delve into philosophies, 
tamper with the metaphysical and we 
study, congest our brains and con- 
tinually think deeply and scien- 
tificly. In our greed for plunder we 
critisize, the past, the historic, the 
present, nothing is spared on account 
of its tradition or sacredness or 
worth. And then in men's lives 
there is hurry and worry, haste and 
anxiety from beginning to end, six 
days are too short and some even find 
in addition to describing the Sab- 
bath, seven days are yet inadequate 
for completing their tasks. 

Is it any wonder that human be- 
ings are quivering masses of brok- 
en health and overwrought nervous 
systems Several days ago, the 
world's greatest financier, J. P. Mor- 
gan, died a nervous wreck, a victim 
of the excessive strain and trials of 
the too ponderous activities in 
finance. We can easily account for 
the instability and lack of poise in 
men's lives, when we thus consider 
what chaos and frenzy are exhibited 
in business, in politics and in re- 
ligion. A hesitating mind is swept 
away in the hurricane of rashness 
and haste, an energetic leader 
tramples over truth in superficial re- 



search, desecrating it by his insuf- 
ficiency and leaves many a gem of 
truth unearthed and passes many a 
flower of rarest bloom, unseen. 

6. Wherein lies the difficulty? 
Surely industry is to be commended 
and sloth to be detested, activity is 
life and idleness leads to degeneracy. 
We do not wish to deny or repute 
these truths, but we emphasize the 
fact that we have forgotten "the 
town in the valley. After periods of 
strain and nervous tension we for- 
get the spot of peace and rest and 
recuperation. We are in the midst 
of battle and we imagine the whole 
world is a war, and we sup- 
pose everything is hubbub. Dur- 
ing the crisis of battle, General 
Grant might frequently have 
been found, apparently unmindful of 
the conflict, calmly and comfortably 
smoking a cigar. Gen. Wash at Val- 
ley Forge would ofttimes withdraw 
from the scenes of hardship and on 
bended knee pour out his anneties in 
prayer and meditation. And Isaac, 
the Bible hero went out to meditate 
in the field at eventire, what action 
for recreation, for inspiration, for 
vision. Christ would ofttimes with- 
draw from the multitude and in the 
secret fastness of the mountains 
would pray in peace and serenity. Yet 
in the perplexities of his life, among 
the rabble in the hissing and boist- 
rous mob, behold Him the unmoved, 
mover of the universe. 

7. Walt Whitman in speaking of 
meditation says he likes to be by 
himself; in his own words "I loaf 
and invite my soul. And the world 
has not fully recognized the worth 
of such a truth. What is the goal 
in view to which a maddened civiliza- 
tion is hurrying at the sacrifice of 
peace, and stability and perfect 
workmanship? Why not enjoy with 
Whitman the pleasure of reflection, 
to have the satisfaction of com- 
prising the truth which comes only 
to those who wait and who are com- 
posed and thoughtful. Doing this 
we cannot lose hope, we cannot live 
purposeless lives, conservative yet 
progressive, at peace yet active with 
life's problems. 

8. How many individuals are per- 
plexed by the noise of confusion and 
frightened by the storm-clouds of 
difficulties and are completely 
and chaos in dogma bewildered, un- 
certain, unamhored. Return, oh lost 
and hasty wanderer, muse with your 
own thoughts and be like Hugo ex- 
presses. 

"Be like a bird that halting in her 
flight, 

A while on boughs too slight; 
Feels them give way beneath her, 

and yet sings, 
Knowing that she hath wings." 

9. Then friends, like the miner 
returns to the town in the valley let 
us occasionally find for ourselves a 
spot of peace, shut away from the 
tumultuous world and in the words 



COLLEGE NEWS 



of Linn let us regain faith and hope 
the loss of which means disorder, 
wickedness, the decay of homes and 
of Linn let us regain faith and hope, 
uprising and communistic excite- 
ment. Lite would then be but a 
burning, sandy desert, surrounded 
on all sides by a dark and impene- 
trable horizon. An endless starry 
night would settle over the world, 
and instead of the hymn of praise 
and the song of hope there would 
everywhere be heard the piercing 
wail of anguish and despair, but the 
spot of rest and faith and peace, 
which as Harpe says, it makes a pil- 
low of softness for the cheek which 
is burning with tears and the touch 
of pain. It pours a balm into the 
very source or sorrow. It is a hope 
undeterred, a flowery seclusion, into 
which the mind when weary of sad- 
ness may retreat for reflection and 
rest. And in the stillness of seclu- 
sion there seems to come a consoling 
will that dwells as with an eternal 
echo on the ear; a dew of mercy fall- 
ing on the bruised and troubled 
hearts of this world. 



VISITORS AT ANNIVERSARY. 

in«- totruwuis were some 01 the 
visitors at the Kalo anniversary: 

Misses Kutn and Ethel Strickler, 
Ruth and Deborah Light, Sarah 
Light and Suzanne Frantz, of Leba- 
non; Miss Pastor and Miss Buffing- 
ton, of Harrisburg; Miss Petterer, of 
Manheim; Prof. Grover C. Bair» '10; 
Prof. Fred Frost, '11, Rev. J. H. Ly- 
ter, '85, of Harrisburg; Messrs. 
Frank Shearer, of Harrisburg; Noah 
Light, of Avon; Miss Bomberger, 
Palmyra; Mrs. Dr. Van Giesen, Leb- 
anon, graduate of Lebanon Valley 
Conservatory. 

Junior Class Play 

The Junior Class on Monday night 
presented their annual play, "The 
Private Secretary." 

The audience was delighted, for 
during the whole performance they 
showed their appreciation by inter- 
mittent applause and continuous 
laughter. The players acted well, 
holding their characters at all 
times. Miss Mae Bell Adams, of the 
oratory department, was the direc- 
tor, and it is to her as much as to 
the players that the final success is 
due. The cast is as follows: 

Mr. Marsland, M. F. H.; R. M. 
Weidler; Harry Harsland (his neph- 
ew), Paul Strickler; Mr. Cattermole 
Harry Charlton; Douglas Cattermole 
(his nephew), Carl Schmidt; Rev. 
Robert Spalding, D. L. Reddick; Mr. 
Sydney Gibson (tailor), John B. Ly- 
ter; John (a servant), Egar Landis; 
Knox (a writ server), D. B. Zimmer- 
man; Edith Marsland (daughter of 
Mr. Marsland), Blanche Risser; Eva 
Webster (her friend and companion) 
Catharine Bachman; Mrs. Stead 
(Douglas' landlady), Mae Meyer; 
Miss Ashford, Miss Josephie Urich. 



Men's Glee Club Concert 

'iuc men a uiee oiuu oi j-eoanon 
Vaney College rendered an excellent 
program in tne auditorium of Engle 
Music i-iall on the evening of April, 
tnetnird. The first number on the pro- 
gram, ""The finars oi tne tuar..n Aie 
i ue uora's," uy Mr. tsenuer and tne 
emu, \vas lonowed t>y neaity ap- 
plause. The enthusiasm ot tne auui- 
ence increased as tne program pro- 
ceeded, so much so, indeed, that dur- 
ing tne intermission between Jfarts I 
and n the applause reached the stage 
of variations. The soloists were all 
obliged to give encores in response 
to sustained applause. 

The numbers which appealed es- 
pecially to the audience were the 
bear song, the negro songs and the 
"Children's Symphony." Mr. Rodes 
was equally good as a negro preach- 
er and as a small boy. 

A very good effect was obtained in 
the rendering of "Hark, as the Twi- 
light Pale," by having the house 
in darkness and only a blue hazy 
light on the scage, which was pret- 
tily decorated with L. V. C. pen- 
nants. 

Mr. Jamison's readings were all 
well received. Prof. E. Edwin Shel- 
don, the musical director, deserves a 
great deal of credit for the work he 
has accomplished with the club. 

After the concert the Men's Glee 
Club was entertained by the Ladies' 
Glee Club. 

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and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

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Joint Session 

The Student Volunteer Band, con- 
sisting of Misses Lehman, Spessard 
and Daugherty and Mr. Bowman, 
had charge of the meeting. Miss 
Lehman gave three reasons for a 
missionary's work: our own experi- 
ence in Christ, the world's need, and 
Christ's last great command, "Go ye 
into all the world." 

Miss Daugherty read a splendid 
paper, "Are More Foreign Mission- 
aries Needed?" In answer to that 
question she gave a number of rea- 
sons. The principal ones are these: 
More missionaries are needed to fill 
the places of those noble men and 
women who each year die at their 
posts or who are obliged to give up 
their work because of ill health or 
advanced age; more are needed be- 
cause of the tremendous expansion 
of the work; the physical sufferings 
of t*»e non-Christian must be re- 
lieved; the intellectual awakening 
among the masses is a call for teach- 
ers; the social evils should claim our 
attention. 

Mr. Bowman gave an excellent dis- 
cussion on "The Supreme Decision of 
the College Student." The student 
becomes a minister, teacher, doctor 
or lawyer and often seeks his field of 
service in the home land, where his 
opportunities are limited. The 
speaker portrayed the great possibil- 
ities for these professional people in 
the foreign field. Are we obeying 
Christ's command "Go ye into all the 
world and preach the gospel"? The 
supreme decision lies with us and 
are we answerine it as God would 
have us answer it? 



BASE BALL. 

Our opening game of this season, 
at Mercersburg Academy, resulted in 
our defeat by the score of 4-2. In 
the first few innings of the game 
playing was loose and luck against us 
so the two runs which won the game 
were scored. The game after this 
inning was close and the final score 
uncertain. The weather was not the 
kind which proves conducive to fast 
baseball and it is to this that the in- 
accuracy of our throwing and un- 
steadiness in their playing may be as- 
cribed. 

During the early part of the game 
Little's pitching did not reach its 
standard and Mercersburg had little 
trouble in placing hits that meant 
runs. This bunching of hits togeth- 
er with the slow and inaccurate field- 
ing of our fellows, caused our down 
fall. However if our team had been 
able to find means of connecting 
with Langdon's curves, the score 
again might have been different. 
The Mercersburg pitcher, a left 
hander, seemed to have good control 
and had his curves working fine. 
More than once did our boys "^alk 
away from the plate with the "satis- 
faction" of having struck out. 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

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we avoid this quicksand by standard 
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Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING £ BROS. 

26,130 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YORK 

Journal Publishing Co. 

^Printers 

Main Street Annville, Pa. 



You ar« corract If you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS 1 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 
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For Cakes and Confectionery 
GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO' 
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Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

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Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. 8. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

A BULE 

"Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardeen 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
ergy of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing positions. 

Every year since J905 we have been in nocl o. 
more applicants to All the best positions in near 1 
ly every grade of public and private school work- 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co. 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



Pr 



COIiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, April 15, 1913 



Ho. 19 



Entered as second-claw. matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annyille, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1875 



Ladies' Glee Club Trip 

The Ladies' Glee Club returned to 
the college on Sunday after having 
given a series of concerts at four 
churches of our denomination. The 
concerts were as follows: Wednes- 
day at First church, Hagerstown; 
Thursday at Salem church, Balti- 
more; Friday at Otterbein Memorial 
church, Baltimore, and Saturday at 
Dillsburg U. B. church. 

The ladies returned from their 
trip tired but confident that they 
had pleased their patrons and that 
they had faithfully represented Leb- 
anon Valley College. Words of 
praise and commendation were 
heard on every side, and at several 
of the churches a much appreciated 
reception was held after the concert 
for the singers. Alumni and friends 
were loud in the expression of their 
fidelity to the college, and healths 
were drunk and yells given in her 
behalf. The church people showed 
their interest by their large attend- 
ance in spite of almost continuous 
rain and dismal weather. Every- 
where a well filled house greeted the 
singers. 

During their stay in Baltimore 
the ladies enjoyed the privilege of 
sight-seeing to the fullest extent. 
Through the kindness of one of the 
parishioners they were taken in a 
large motor car to view the city and 
surrcuding districts. Many points 
of interest were noted. The trip 
was valuable and pleasant for all. 

At Hagerstown the ladies were 
met at the station with touring cars 
and taken to their stopping places 
in these. Two of the ladies missed 
the train in Hagerstown and were 
obliged to spend Thursday there in- 
stead cf enjoying the sight-seeing 
trip in Baltimore. They reached 
Baltimore, however, in time for the 
concert at night. 

The Glee and Mandolin Clubs, of 
Gettysburg College, had engage- 
ments at Hagerstown and Baltimore 
on the same- evenings as our club. 
This fact was the cause of a com- 
bined concert on the train running 
between these two cities. The ladies 
w fre invited to go into the private 
tfcr cf the Gettysburg clubs. There 
th* Gettvsburs: Clubs entertained 
them with their music and then the 



Ladies' club sang for the men. The 
concert was enjoyed by all and was a 
special treat for the passengers who 
were fortunate enough to hear it. 
It is hoped that Annville people will 
show their interestt in the Ladies' 
Glee Club by attending the concert 
in Engle Hall on Monday, April 21. 



The Baseball "Rain Song" 

Rain, Rain, Rain if it wjould only 
do something else but rain! This 
surely was the sentence on the tip 
of all our tongues, during the lat- 
ter part of last week. The steady 
downpour of rain last week made 
Biddle Field at Dickinson so muddy 
that a game was impossible. 

On Saturday morning our manag- 
er Mr. Ressler, received a telegram 
from Carlisle, canceling the game. 
However, it was stated that Wednes- 
day April 16th, was open. It is the 
intention of the manager to take our 
team to Carlisle on that date. 

Coach Pritchard nas expressed 
great confidence in his team, and he 
prophesied that our list of victories 
would be opened by Dickinson. The 
team is in tha best condition, work- 
ing, "like clockwork" under the 
efficient leadership of Captain J. Ly- 
ter. 

Delaware will play here next Sat- 
urday, and since this is our first 
heme game, it must be a victory. 
This contest has always been a 
close one, and one worthy of our 
best efforts. So everybody get be- 
hind the team and root for all that 
is in you. We must win this game. 

The day after the Delaware game, 
Mr. Ressler takes the team to Man- 
assas, Va., where the first game on 
the Southern trip is to De played. On 
this trip we are sure to take the, 
majority of the games; so fellows 
rally behind your team, encourage 
it, boost it, and cheer for it, 60 that 
this season will be a "howling" suc- 
cess. 



The Star Course Committee for 
the season of 1913-14 was elected 
last week. They have organized and 
the committee is as follows: C. H. 
Arndt, Chairman; Paul J. Bowman, 
Treasurer; Misses Ruth V. Engle, 
Larene Engle, Vera Myers, Mary A. 
Spayd, Mary Daugherty, and Messrs. 
John Ness, Faber Stengle, Huber 
Heintzelman. 



Men's Glee Club 

The Men's Glee Club after a suc- 
cessful season, bid farewell to the 
concert platform. Not only has the 
club crowned itself with success, 
but has added fame and glory to its 
dear Alam Mater, which it so loyally 
served. 

The club under the direction of 
Prof. Sheldon, and managed by Mr. 
Weaver has attained the distinction 
of being considered the best musical 
cragnizaticn of its. kind in the his- 
tory of the school. 

April eighth, found them in 
Lebanon where a concert was given 
in the P. 0. S. cf A. Hall. A large 
crowd being present, the club work 
was one of art, the vocal and in- 
strumental solos were exceptionally 
good. 

April 10, the boys journeyed to 
Hummelstcwn and as usua? sustain- 
ed their high standard. The "Negro 
sermon," by Mr. Rodes and semi- 
chcrus was very real in its rendi- 
tion, in fact so real, that Mr. Snave- 
ly received a black eye, and the ever 
musical Bender ."busted," a chair, 
causing the audience to yell with 
delight. The violin solo, "Loves. 
Torment," by Mr. Statton, was one 
cf the features of the evening, and 
Mr. Bctts the bass scloist was in fine 
forrry and his calls before the cur- 
tain were numerous. Messrs. Bashore 
and Hcffer, students in the academy 
managed the concert at this place. 

Tho farewell concert was given 
the following evening in Hershey, 
wet was the day, and dark the ni<?ht 
yet nature with all its rain could 
not dampen the spirits of of our Glee 
Club, who rendered music such as 
has not been heard since the days of 
Orpheus. Mr. Jameson deliehted the 
audience with his ever ready wit and 
spicy readings, and some of the 
laughter turned into hysterical 
shrieks during his imoersonation of 
"Getting Ready to Make a Call." 
Mr. Lyter in his trombone solo, 
"Schubert's Serenade," called forth 
much applause by his masterful exe- 
cution. 

After the concert the ladies., un- 
der whose auspices they sang gave 
them a reception at the parsonage. 
It is useless to say that they enjoyed 
it, for what more fitting ceremony 
cculd be used to end up a success- 
ful season. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieuus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 
Social 

ESTA WAREHEIM 
Athletics 

PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 
PAUL STRICKLER '14 

Music 
G. F. BOTTS 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 



Subscription Price Si. 00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 

to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Adminis:ra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
jege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

Once more the mantle of the edi- 
torship has fallen on a new person, 
and once more the new editor feels 
the greatness of the task. The for- 
mer editor whose faithfulness we 
taka as our example, casts off the 
burden like a light scarf, while the 
new incumbent feels the weight of 
a millstone pressing on his should- 
ers. But w e have put our hands to 
the plow, sunk our furrow deep, and 
are determined, for w e will not look 
back. We have fixed our eyes on 
our goal ant^ are going forward, 
knowing that there are rocks of cri- 
ticism, and roots of discouragement 
in our path which will try to stop 
our progress and belittle our suc- 
cess. We feel that our positions are 
such that will demand our best ef- 
efforts, and our colsest attention, 
but who can do more than their 
best, and this we promise you. 

Changes in conditions demand 
changes in methods, so we outline 
no definite policy at this time, but 
we do say that we mean to be pro- 
gressive and keep up with our school 
in its forward movement. We do 
not only wish this, but we hope to 
be in some measure the advance 
guard, that goes forward and car- 
ries the aims, ambitions and ideals 
of our school among its friends. 

We wish to make it a "News" in 
the true sense of the word, and pub- 
lish events from all the cardinal 
points of our college world. We can 
do this with your aid, so be free to 
criticise in a constructive way and 



also make suggestions. For with co- 
operation we may hope to attain 

success. 1 



IN MEMORY OF THE 

TITANIC DEAD. 



Sea! if in thy bosom all unknown 
Thou holdest locked within thy grim 
embrace 

Those tokens of the love toward mor- 
tals shown, 
Symbolical of resurrection grace, 

Fair flowers stainless in thy depths 
below 

Such as in earthly realms of life 
and air, 

Touched by the wand of Phoebus, 
brightly glow, 
And lend the breeze perfume be- 
yond compare. 

If thou hast pity in thine inmost 
soul, 

Lay these upon that grim Titanic 
tomb : 

That, as the vernal seasons o'er thee 
roll, 

These burst in fullest all resplend- 
ent bloom, 
In mute commemoration of that hour 

When thou exactedst all thine aw- 
ful toll, 

Plucking from many a home the 
fairest flower, 
And meting to the world a tear- 
ful dole. 

In those dim regions far of deep-sea 
stream, 

Where gaunt, strange creatures 
weird existence find; 
Where many a form, of God the work 
supreme, 

That tomb confines, the costliest 
e'er designed; 
There may these blossoms fair the 
depths illume, 
And cast their radiance o'er grim 
scenes forlorn, 
Lighting the dismal realms of ocean 
gloom 



With hope of glory and eternal 
morn 

F. M. VAN SCHAAK. 



On Sunday night ihe student body 
met in the ladies' parlors from 5.30 
to 6 o'clock and held a song service. 
This is the beginning of a new cus- 
tom which we hope will contiue and 
become a college tradition. We 
congratulate the originators of the 
plan. 



A Marsh-Mellow Toast 

Thursday evening, April 10, sev- 
eral of the dormitory girls entertain- 
ed in honor of Miss Katharine Pet- 
ers, of Harrisburg, who spent Thurs- 
day and Friday as a guest of Miss 
Mary Irwin. A delightful feature of 
the evening was toasting marsh mal- 
lows over candles after which other 
refreshments were served. Those 
present were Misses Katharine Pet- 
ers, Mary Irwin, Larene Engle, 
Belle Orris, Ruth Engle and Flor- 
ence Mentz; Messrs. G. A. Richie, 
Kephart Bcughter, Abraham Dear- 
olf, "Cotton" Dehcff, "Dave" Evans, 
John Lerew. 



Y. W. C. A. 

"Women of the Old Testament" 
was the subject discussed in the 
Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion. Miss Maude Baker, the lead- 
er, drew lessons from the lives of 
Eve, Sarah and Rachel, some of the 
beautiful characters of Old Testa- 
ment times. The subject was very 
interesting and helpful to all the 
girls. 



Y. M. C. A. 

At a meeting of the Y. M. C. A. 
last week it was decided to hold 
May Day Exercises this year. At the 
same meeting the cabinet was an- 
nounced which is as follows: R. M. 
Weidler, L. B. Harnish, J. O. Jones, 
C. E. Brenneman, C. H. Arndt, P. J. 
Bowman, L. A. Rodes, C. K. Luse. 



SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 

Enclosed please find One Dollar for College News subscrip- 
tion. Send News to following address: 

Name 

Street 

City • ........ . . . . ..... State 1 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Contributions for Athletics for L. V. C. 

Believing that successful athletics helps greatly to advertise 
the college, and to develop a wholesome college atmosphere in the 
student body, and knowing that all the alumni and many friends 
are interested in the onward march of the school, we request that 
contributions be made to this fund by all who will do so. Any 
amount, however small, will be greatly appreciated. Send all 
monies to Rer. W. H. Weaver, college treasurer. 

G. D. GOSSARD, Pres. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 

KALOZETEAN 
My Field Trips to the Water 
Works, H. M. Bender; violin solo, 
Donald Stangle; debate: Resolved, 
That the hypocrite is a more desir- 
able character than the liar; affirm- 
ative, V. W. Jamison, Marcel Van 
Bereghy; negative, Wm. E. Mickey, 
Elmer Kirkpatrick; Is Annville on 
the Map? T. B. Lyter; The Decay of 
the Universe, Boaz G. Light- chorus, 
society. 



Clio-Philo Joint Session 

Piano solo, Miss Mary Spayd; 
reading, Miss Blanche Risser, es- 
say, Mr. Ellis Zimmerman; quar- 
tette, Miss Edith Gingrich, Miss Lot- 
tie Spessard, Mr. George Botts, Mr. 
Lester Redes; original story, Miss 
Belle Orris; vocal s clo, Mr. Carl 
Snavely, autobiography, Mr. Sedic 
Pine. Olive Branch and Living 
Thoughts, editors. 



Dr. Schaeffer's Address 

Last Tuesday at chapel Lebanon 
Valley's students had the great 
pleasure of hearing Dr. N. C. 
Schaeffer, the State Superintendent 
of Public Instruction. His lecture 
certainly was a treat for it brought 
vividly before the minds of all, the 
value of an education. 

He emphasized the fact that an 
educated man is worth more in dol- 
lars and cents than an uneducated 
man, quoting statistics as authority. 
An increase of education means an 
increase of wages. So many young 
People of today do not appreciate 
their high school education. Every 
Profession requires four years high 
school training for entrance, and 
next year in some professions one 
year college credit will be required 
in addition. There are forty voca- 
tions which are now requiring a 
four years' high school course. He 
made us realize we ought to be 



spending our time for our own ad- 
vantage and adavneement and urged 
us to be diligent in preparing our- 
selves for our life's profession. 



Notice to Alumni 

The College is trying to secure a 
complete file of old catalogues. 
Copies of the College catalogues for 
the years 1868-1869, 1879-1880, 
1890-1891, and 1895-1896 will com- 
plete the files. Please carefully 
look at your old catalogues and if 
you have any of the above numbers, 
please mail or send them to the 
Registrar. 



Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 

Jlebanon l/alley 
College 

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Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemish y 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 



Write for catalogue 

ZRev. S. 0. Sossard, !Prcsideni 
jfnnvitle, SPa. 



ITS 



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AT 



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as new with a full year's guaranty. 
Students as well as professional men 
may increase their efficiency by the 
use of a writing- machine. 

Our catalogue will interest you. 

Send for it today. 

THE U. B. PUBLISHING HOUSE 

W. R. Funk. Mgr. 

Dayton, Ohio 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
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on Filbert Street. 

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PHILADELPHIA 



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%, SCHOOL of V\ 
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COLLEGE NEWS 



Items of Interest 



The Lebanon Valley chapter of the 
"White Cross Single Standard 
League," organized last week with 
forty-nine charter members. L. B. 
Harnish, '14 was elected president. 

Mr. Edward Mutch, '14, spent sev- 
eral days in Philadelphia last week 
visiting Mr. Samuel Groh, who was 
a student here last year, but at pres- 
ent studying at the University of 
Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Earnest, of Hummelstown, a 
former student here, visited us last 
Wednesday. 

Rev. G. M. Miller and family, who 
are visiting relatives in Lebanon 
spent some time in Annville last 
week visiting the school and church. 
Rev. Miller is pastor of tne First U. 
B. Church in Johnstown. 

Miss Reba Lehman visited her 
brother, Prof. Max Lehman, in Bal- 
timore, last week. 

Miss Nellie and Mr. Louis Buf- 
fington spent Sunday visiting Dr. 
Lehman and family. 

Miss. Adams, of the Oratory De- 
partment, and Miss Helen Brightbill 
were at Hershey last Tuesday even- 
ing to see "Princess Kiku," a Japa- 
nese play. Miss Margaret Leitheiser 
played the principal role. 

K:;n. A. S. Kreider, a trustee, of 
the college, tco.^ the oath of office 
at. Congressman from the 18th Con- 
gressional district of Pennsylvania 
at the opening of the special session 
on April seventh. 

Mr. Paul J. Bowman, '15 spent 
Friday and Saturday at his home in 
Middletown. 

Mr. Alvine Weaver, '15 visited 
friends in Harrisburg cn Saturday. 

Mrs. Emery Hamilton spent Sun- 
day in Annville. 

Scott Anderson was called home 
on account of the death of hia 
mcther. 

Roy Spangler spent Sunday in 
Ycrk. 

Dr. Gossard spent Sunday in Har- 
risburg preaching in the First U. 
IV Church in the morning, and de- 
livering an address at the Sixth 
Street Church in the afternoon. 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at I 

GOLLAM'S 

Quantity ✓ * ' Quality 
Main Street 



"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students ' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 
II. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eogle Hotel Annville, Pa 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING I BROS. 

2 6'130 Nassau St, 25 W. 42d St.. NEW YORK 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

' Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAHilaH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. 8. MIL LER W. MAIN ST. 

A RULE 

"Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Barrieen 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has heen refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
erg} of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will bje continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing positions. 

Everv vear since 1905 we have been in need 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near 
Jy every grade of public and private school work 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co' 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



J 



COLLEGE 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, Appil 22, 1913 



No. 201 5 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3. 1*79 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB HON. AARON S. LEBANON VALLEY 

HOME CONCERT WATKINS' ADDRESS WINS AND LOSES 



The home concert of the Ladies' 
Glee Club was given in Engle Hall 
on Monday evening before a large 
audience. The entire concert from 
its first number to the last was most 
entertaining. The numbers were 
well rendered and the content of the 
program was varied, its numbers well 



The students of Lebanon Valley 
College were very fortunate in hav- 
ing the Hon. Aarcn S. Watkins, 
twice canidate for the vice presi- 
dency of the United States on the 
Prohibition ticket, to address them 
in the chapel on Wedneday morn- 
ing. After reading the 145 th Psalm 



LEBANON VALLEY VS. DICKINSON 

The game at Carlisle with Dick- 
inson on April 16, resulted in a score 
of 4-3 against us. The contest was 
a close one and ah interesting one 
to see from the bleachers. During 
the first few innings both teams 




selected. The ability of the girls, as 
singers, and of Miss Schmidt, as di- 
rector, was demonstrated throughout 
the program. 

Among some of the "hits" of the 
program were "Irish Lullaby," "For- 
get-Me-Not," and the duet by Misses 
Gingrich and Turby, "Go, Pretty 
(Continued On page 2) 



and offering prayer, Dr. Watkins de- 
livered a very interesting and help- 
ful address on "Education." He 
said that there is something heroic 
in the life of every student, that 
every real student has given up 
something. Then he asked "Is this 
worth while?" In answering this 
Continued on page 4 



scored, and at the beginning of the 
seventh the tally stood 3-2 in our 
favor. Then Dickinson took a brace, 
and by bunching hits scored twp 
runs. 

Our team was unable to hit Hoch, 
the Dickinson twirler, who struck out 
at West Point, the previous week, 
Continued on page 2 



COLLE'GE news 



College fleuus 

Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. jM. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 
Social 
ESTA wareheim 
Athletics 

PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 
PAUL STRICKLER '14 

Music 

G. F. BOTTS 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 



Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 

tO HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Administra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITORIAL. 

School spirit among the student 
body is the one thing which makes 
school activities a success or a fail- 
ure. Above all things it should be 
encouraged. In any school the stu- 
dent body is the principle feature. 
An institution may have handsome 
buildings, excellent equipment, and 
a competent faculty, but if there are 
no students the buildings, equipment 
and faculty are useless. In like man- 
ner, if there is a student body, and 
it is a dissatisfied, complaining 
group, which nothing can satisfy, 
and which can do nothing but com- 
plain and "knock" it is worth about 
as much to itself and the college as 
the institution with no student body. 
So with just a little thought, it can 
readily be seen that it is the stu- 
dents who make the college. 

Now what we want Lebanon Val- 
ley to be is the best that we, the stu- 
dent body, can make it. If we all 
take a long pull, and pull together 
and work for its best interests, there 
is no height to which our school can- 
not rise. When in the class room 
we should do our best, not only for 
^ourselves, but for the school; when 
ion the athletic field serving our alma 
mater, we should work with every 
ounce of our strength; when with 
glee clubs or debating teams our first 
thought should be for the school, and 
how .we can best serve and advertise 
it. Since we want our school to be 
the best, the thing for us to do is to 
"boost;" it whenever we get the op- 
portunity, and help it wherever pos- 
sible. 



By placing the school first, put- 
ting aside our own little grievences, 
and by having and showing a lot of 
school spirit, we can make ourselves 
happy, and do a great deal of good 
for the institution. 



GIRLS' GLEE CLUB CONCERT. 



Continued from page 1 



Rose." Some of the characters rep- 
resented were: "A Model College 
Girl," "The Militant Suffragette" 
and "The Country Maids." The suf- 
fragette song and "The Tale of a 
Stocking" were written for the club 
by Mr. Max F. Lehman. The quar- 
tette, which sang several numbers, 
added greatly to the program. In 
"Wanted, a Husband," local color 
was given to the concert. The read- 
ings by Miss Brightbill were excel- 
lent and proved her natural ability 
as a reader. 

In this concert and in the one giv- 
en by the Boys' Glee Club several 
weeks ago, the college has an excel- 
lent advertising medium. The direc- 
tors of both are to be congratulated 
upon the excellency of their work. 



BASE BALL 

Continued from page 1 

fifteen cadets. Little twirled like a 
"big leaguer" and had a goodly num- 
ber of strikeouts to his credit. 

Our team pulled together perfect- 
ly, and from their playing it seem- 
ed certain that the Delaware game 
would be ours. 

T. Lyter in the second inning hit 
out a "three bagger" that started 
the scoring habit and made Dickin- 
son sit up and take notice. Score: 
LEBANON VALLEY. 





R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 



















J. Lyter, 3b 


1 


1 


2 
















2 


3 





T. Lyter, c. ... 


1 


2 


7 


2 


1 


Dearolf, 2b. 


1 





2 








Little, p 


. . . 





1 


4 










1 


9 





1 










1 








Statton, rf. 

















Totals 


3 


4 


24 


9 


2 


DICKINSON 












R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 


Price, 3b 


1 





1 


1 





Steckel, ss. 


1 





3 


3 


1 




1 


1 


1 








Moose, rf 


1 


1 











Potter, lb 





2 


9 


2 


. 


Goldstein, c. 








12 


1 










1 











Pauxtis, 2b. 








1 


2 


1 


Brenniman, p. . 


... 














Hock, p 





1 





1 





Totals 


4 


6 


27 


10 


2 



The Delaware State game, our 
first home game, resulted in a vic- 



tory for us by the uneven score of 
10-2. The Delaware boys have al- 
ways been something of rivals with 
us, and it is to the credit of our team 
that we won by so large a score. 

Coehegan started to pitch for the 
visitors but our batting order seem- 
ed to fit his curves so well, that he 
got himself in a "hole" from which 
he could hardly extricate himself 
without several runs scoring. The 
Southpaw was recalled and Hoch un- 
dertook his task. However we were 
intent on scoring and before the inn- 
ing ended, two runs were put to our 
credit. Matthews was in fine form 
and he had no trouble in doing with 
the batter what he wished. 

In this first inning a habit of hit- 
ting was started by our team which 
as the game progressed, grew strong- 
er and stronger. Hoch tried his best 
to keep us from finding his delivery 
but to no avail. Stickle, T. Lyter and 
Lerew in these first two innings hit 
the ball to a safe place in the field. 
These hits meant runs and again in 
the second inning a third tally was 
put on our list of scores. 

In the fifth inning, with two out, 
T. Lyter got on first base. Imme- 
diately he stole second and third. 
Dearolf was at the bat and the time 
seemed ripe again for scoring. All 
that was needed was a nice little 
single by "Aby." But he in his 
eagerness was not content with a 
mere one-base hit, so "clouted the 
ball" out to the left field fence for 
three bases. The hit was the longest 
seen on the field for several years 
and it would have been a "homer" 
except that on rounding second. 
Dearolf collided accidentally with 
Delaware's second baseman. This 
accident prostrated both of them on 
the ground and by it the runner 
reached third base only. 

In the sixth period we again had 
a great batting test, hitting out four 
singles and one double. These hits 
meant a final tally of four runs ad- 
ded to our list. 

Our entire team played together 
like "clockwork" and everything was 
working in the best of order. Dear- 
olf, Stickell and Lerew starred at the 
bat, and it is to their hitting that 
many of the runs were due. T. Lyter 
and Snavely did good fielding and 
pulled off many fine plays. 



STAR COURSE. 

The Star Course committee is 
Avorking with all their might. There 
are very promising signs for a good 
"course" for next year. They have 
interviewed the representatives of 
the Empire and Lyceum Bureaus. 
In the near future they will meet 
with Dr. Andrew Johnson, the rep- 
resentative of the Coit company. 
They will then select the best. We 
can well count on a good Star Course 
and great things are expected. 



Prof. Wanner spent Sunday in 
Harrisburg. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



CLI-PHI10 JOINT SESSION. 

On last Friday evening the Clion- 
ian and Philokosmian literary socie- 
ties met in their second semi-annual 
joint session. The Clio officers pre- 
sided and under them a very interest- 
ing program was rendered. Mr. 
Carl Grey Snavely made his formal, 
debut into musical activities by 
favoring the societies with a bass 
solo. The quartette delighted the 
audience with their first number, and 
were called on for several encores. 
Indeed, every number on the program 
came up to the high standad that is 
usual around Lebanon Valley. After 
the literary program delightful re- 
freshments were served, and a gener- 
al social time was enjoyed. The 
Delaware College Baseball players 
were among t,he guests and their 
presence added to the gayety of the 
evening. 



CALENDAR. 

April 21, Monday, 7.45, Girls' Glee 
Club Concert. 

April 22, Tuesday, 6.00, Students' 
Prayermeeting. 

April 23, Wednesday, 6.15, Social 
Hour in Parlors. 

April 25, Friday, 7.15, Clio enter- 
tains Seniors. 

April 27, Sunday, 1.00, Y. M. C. 
A.; 1.30, Y. W. C. A. 



Y. W. C. A. 

Miss Florence Clippinger led in 
the Y. W. C. A. meeting. Her sub- 
ject was Bible study. She empha- 
sized the fact that we read our Bibles, 
not only daily but sytematically. 
Especially was the study of the Bible 
over the summer time brought out. 
When we leave school we should 
study our Bibles as well as when in 
school. She closed her talk by rec- 
ommending several books for study 
over the summer. 



KALOZETEAN PROGRAM. 

Current Events, H. E. Shaeffer; My 
Experience in Chicago, V. M. Hef- 
felfinger; My Trip to the Thousand 
Islands, F. M. Van Schaack. Ex- 
temporaneous Debate: Affirmative, 
H. E. Snavely, Allen Walter; Nega- 
tive, J. B. Lyter, P. L. Strickler; 
Pucilanimous, Carl F. Schmidt; 
Chorus, Society; Examiner, Editor. 



AN INFORAL EVENING. 

The professors of the ladies' dor- 
mitory entertained the wives of the 
faculty and a few others last Thurs- 
day evening in the Ladies Parlors. 
Light refreshments were served. 
Those present were Mrs. Gossard, 
Miss Gossard, Mrs. Lehman, Miss 
Reba Lehman, Mrs. Sheldon, Mrs. 
Shroyer, Miss Schmidt, Miss Adams, 
Miss Seltzer and Miss Johnson. 



Paul Loser, ex-'13, visited friends 
in Easton on Saturday and Sunday. 
He witnessed the Lafayette-Stephen- 
son, game on Saturday afternoon. 



CO-EDUCATION IN FACT. 

On Wednesday evening from 6.15 
to 7.15 o'clock, the ladies entertain- 
ed the college fellows in the dorma- 
tory parlors. Every person was busy 
every minute of the hour, for as fast 
as one game was finished another 
was introduced. The first game, 
"Impersonation," made every person 
feel at home, for it demanded promis- 
cuous mingling and witty conversa- 
tion. This was followed by "The 
Knight Whistle," a game in which 
two gallants took the solemn vows 
of knighthood in a very uncere- 
monious fashion. To end up the af- 
fair "The Musical Rug" was intro- 
duced, which with its rapid action 
and marshal time formed an appro- 
priate climax for the function. 

Much credit is due the people in 
charge, and we hope that many more 
such occasions will be calendared. 



THE PRESIDENT S CONVENTION 
AT LAFAYETTE COLLEGE. 

Lafayette College opened her doors 
to the Y. M. C. A. presidents con- 
vention, and proved her sincerity by 
the delightful time she showed the 
visiting delegates. 

Dr. Warfield, president of Lafay- 
ette, delivered the opening address. 
He gave us the freedom of the col- 
lege, which was seconded by all the 
students, for their cry was "make 
your self at home." 

The conference as a whole was 
one of inspiration, many new ideas 
were advanced, and plans were sug- 
gested that will make the work of 
our association better. 

The principal speakers were: Dr. 
Warfield, of Lafayette College; J. 
B. Carruthers, State Y. M. C. A. Sec- 
retary; F. R. Rindge, Jr., of New 
York; Prof. F. H. Green, of West 
Chester State Normal School; Prof. 
Chas. Erdman, of Princeton; Mr. 
Beaver, of New York, and Mr. R. H. 
Edwards, of New York. 



Co/leffe 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistty 

and Biology 
Mtisic, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 



Write for catalogue 

ftev. S. *D. Sossard, Preside ni 
ytnnville, tPa. 



GO TO IT BOYS 

ITS 

Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 

AT 

"USSY'S" 

A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




PSS * 1 







Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

% SCHOOL of V\ 
'<% ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Stnd for a Catalooue. TROY, N.Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



HON. AARON S. W ATKINS' 
ADDRESS. 

(Continued from page 1) 

question man begins to figure and 
always gets more dollars than 
"sense" in his figuring. 

"Is it worth while to get an edu- 
cation? That depends upon what 
you do with it. It doesn't pay, if the 
the end is merely to pile up facts, or 
to make money. It is an awful 
thing to get a fortune larger than a 
man. The woman who marries a 
fortune often gets an insignificant 
man with it. A man's avoirdupois 
may" be two hundred pounds yet he 
may weigh only twelve ounces in- 
tellectually." 

"Education is not to enable you 
to escape hard work. It is to enable 
you to work harder. If you can't be 
happy in your work you will never 
be happy anywhere." 

He said it was more respectable to 
be a $1000 a year cook than a four 
dollar and a half a week clerk, be- 
cause in order to be. a $1000 a year 
cook you must be able to do that 
work well. He said a first class brick 
layer is a thousand times better than* 
a well dressed loafer or a "half- 
baked" professional man. 

"It is necessary to have a charac- 
ter to be educated. You can't com- 
mit a moral wrong without proving 
that somewhere you are intelectually 
dull. The world needs dependable 
people, men who won't run, men who 
wil stand by their principles." 
. "I am here to tell you that you 
can get an education, that you can 
succeed. I am here to give you con- 
fidence, to convince you that you can 
grapple with the problems and con- 
quer them." 

"Success is sretting rieht with the 
great ideas of the world and with 
yourself. Success consists in lining 
uo with the ereat reforms of the 
day. To be truly sreat line ud with 
the eomine questions, the greatest of 
which is the temperance question." 

PHIL0 PROGRAM. 

Pen Points, D. B. Basehore; The 
New Era, G. L. Blouch; Debate, Re- 
solved, That the interests of the em- 
ployer and employees are mutual; 
Ocarina Solo, Landis R. Klinger; 
The War on Vice, D. E. Zimmerman; 
Living Thoughts, Editor. 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



CLI0NIAN LITERARY SOCIETY. 

The Clionian Literary Society will 
have the pleasure of being the first 
to entertain the seniors this coming 
Friday. A good programme is be- 
ing prepared which we trust all will 
enjoy. 



Prof. Sprecher, principal of the 
Parksburg High School, witnessed 
the game on Saturday. 

Dr. J: A:.Lyteiy '85, became a thir- 
ty-second degree Mason last week. 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 

Quantity ✓ ✓ ' Quality 
Main Street 



"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




You are correct If you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffc Shoes 

W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 
First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 
H. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Motel Annville, F"a 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING £ BROS, 

2 6-130 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YORK 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO> 
LATES. ALWAYS FFESH 

W, Main St. Annville, Pa, 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

' Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAH! RfiH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. 8. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



A EULE 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



"Put this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardeen 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
ruembeiship or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." . „j 

During twentv-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
ergy of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our vvor* 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we nnu 
that most of our good, strong applicants were »* 
one time inexperienced in securing positions. , 

Every vear since 1905 we have been in neeio' 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near 
ly every grade of public and private school worn 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

F. L. MYEPS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Fa Co 
operating agencies in Denver and AtlaO" 



COLLEGE t W S 



LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V. 



flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, April 29, 1913 



No. 21 )ll 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910. at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of J 



March 3, 1879. 



LEBANON VALLEY'S 
SOUTHERN TRIP 

GEORGETOWN GAME. 

Playing a game, immediately af- 
ter arriving from a long ride and 
immediately before eating dinner is 
net the mcst pleasant occupation. 
Thru it was that the Lebanon Valley 
V£. Georgetown University score, 
was 11-4 against us. The game was 
slow and uninteresting, with errors 
freely distributed. 

Little our pitcher, was not feeling 
^el J so was unable to pitch the en- 
tire game. Stickell, without warm- 
I ing up, went in the box and finished 
,' the game. Not a fellow on the team 
wa? in good, spirits, so it was im- 
possible to play ball in the usual 
style. Never theles.s Lerew was in 
such form, that' he mad? three hits 
out of four times at bat. 
g^.The telle \v s were defeated only 
because of their condition at the time 
cf the game. However, they left for 
Newark, Del., with a determination 
to win and show their alma mater 
^'that a defeat counts only a defeat 
I when it is. not an incentive for a vic- 
tory later on. 

DELAWARE GAME 

The score at Delaware State was 
u: fortunate, darkness coming on be- 
fore the game was ended. The con- 
test did not start till late, and when 
|six and cne half innings had been 
played, the umpire stopped proceed- 
ings. No one had any idea of allow- 
ing the Newark team to win and it 
is too. the quick ending of the game 
that our defeat is due. Our team 
had no trouble in getting connected 
with the opposing pitcher and from 
the beginning long drives were fre- 
quently hit out. The final score 
of 5-4, shows how the game stood 
and how easily another inning or so 
would have turned the big end to- 
ward us. In these six innings our 
fellows made seven hits to Delaware's 
four and had no trouble in taking 
eare of things as they wished. 
Stickell pitched fine ball and was at 
his ease in tight places. He struck 
out eight men during this half game 
and kept the four hits that were 
made, scattered widely. Score: 

R. H. E. 

L. V 1 1 2 — 4 4 1 

Delaware ... 2 3 — 5 7 2 

Continued on page 2 



CLIO ENTERTAINS THE SENIORS. 

The Clionian Literary Society en- 
tertained the dignified Seniors on 
Friday evening. Nearly all of the 
Seniors were present, and seemed to 
enjoy the evening. The rest of us had 
some good laughs at their expense. 

Mary Spayd made a "hit" or two 
with her Senior Rubs. She repre- 
sented herself as the woman who had 
washed for the Seniors for four 
years, and a typical washer-woman 
she was! She told them how sorry 
she was that they were leaving L. 
V. C, and that she had bought each 
of them a gift, which would be of 
use to them in the future. Some 
of the gifts were especially appro- 
priate, for example: Edna Yarker's 
parlor furniture for the parsonage, 
Edith Lehman's gun to catch a man 
or to use in suffragette fights, Mr. 
Light's cockerel, Sarah Zimmerman's 
bottle of "catch-up," Mr. Klinger's 
"reminder of the girl at home" and 
Mr. Boughter's farming implements 
for use on the Engle farm. 

The Senior Prophecies were given 
by a gypsy seated beside a camp fire. 
The program was as follows: 

Piano Solo, May Meyer; Senior 
Greetings, Blanche Risser; Senior 
Reminiscences, LaRene Engle; Quar- 
tette, Miss Gingrich, Brightbill, R. 
E. Engle, Spayd; Reading, Elta 
Weaver; Senior Rubs, Mary Spayd; 
Senior Prophecies, Esther Heintzel- 
man; Violin Solo, Ruth E. Engle. 

After the program, w r hich was good 
throughout, pineapple sherbet, cake, 
and caramels were served. Long live 
the class of 1913! 



CALENDAR. 

Tuesday, April 29th — 6 p. m., 
Prayer Meeting, L. B. Harnish, Lead- 
er. 

Wednesday, April 30th — 6.15, So- 
cial hour in Ladies' Parlor; 7.15, 
Mathematical Round Table. 

Thursday, May 1st — Deutscher 
Verein hike to Water Works. 

Friday, May 2nd — 8 o'clock, Anniver- 
sary Philokosmian Literary Society. 

Saturday, May 3 — Juniors to give 
"The Private Secretary" in Myers- 
town. 



The Boys' Glee Club have invited 
the Girls' Glee Club to banquet with 
them at The Hershey Cafe on Tues- 
day evening, April 29th. A splen- 
did menu has been arranged for, and 
all are looking forward to a splen- 
did time. 



TRACK TEAM SHOWS 
UP WELL AT PENN 



At the University of Pennsylvania 
relay races o n Saturday, Lebanon 
Valley's team was matched against 
some of the strongest minor colleges 
cf the east, and through an unfort- 
unate accident lost the race. As it 
was tied for third place, but were- 
given fourth. 

"Polly" Stuckler started the race 
for Lebanon Valley and at the very 
out set was boxed in, with a man in 
front, side and back of him. TVy- 
ing to get out, his foot broke down 
and to "Polly" must be given the credit 
it of finishing his quarter with the- 
pain of running on his injured foot.. 
Evans ran second and finished fifth,. 
Kirkpatrick running third came in 
fourth gaining considerable ground. 
Michey ran last ana caught the 
fourth man antLr5a"ssed him half way- 
around the track. In coming in at 
the finish the fourth man gradually 
came cn and wasi given 3rd place. 
To all observers, Lebanon Valley 
won third place. Manhattan Col- 
lege won the race, New! York City 
College second and Deninsan third. 

This is the first time in the his- 
tory of the school that Lebanon Val- 
ley has been represented c<n the? 
track and must be congratulated for 
her showing. 



Y. M. C. A. 

Because of the absence of the ap- 
pointed leader the President took 
charge of- the Y. M. C. A. meeting. 
He used as his subject, "A Strong 
Man for the Kingdom." He devel- 
oped it in such a way as to show the 
possibilities of our organization if 
we are strong in our purpose. The 
after meeting was interesting, and 
all that spoke layed emphasis on the 
spiritual side of oar Y. M. C. A. 
work. 



A BIRTHDAY PARTY. 

Three of the dormitory girls en- 
tertained at a chafing-dish party, 
last Wednesday evening, in honor of 
their birthdays. A delightful even- 
ing was spent. Those present were- 
Misses Ruth V. Engle, Dora Ryland, 
Ruth Quigley, Messrs. Boughter,. 
Klinger and Oleweiler. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College J^euis 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 
ESTA WAREHEIM 'lfi 

Athletics 

PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 
PAUL, STRICKLER '14 

Music 

G. F. BOTTS '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 



Subscription Price S1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 

tO HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Administra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 

Editorial 

The question is often asked "Does 
Lebanon Valley have the loyal sup- 
port of her alumni, her student body 
and her friends that she should 
have?" If each one of us would 
answer this question we would prob- 
ably say "Yes" with question marks 
after the answer. 

There are numerous tests for loy- 
alty but these tests are never cer- 
tain or absolute. For the student 
loyalty to one's college means one 
thing to the alumnus it has another 
meaning while to the friend it 
means something still different. 

"What is loyalty ?" asks the stud- 
ent and the answer comes, back "Be 
a 'booster.' " Loyalty to all students 
of Lebanon Valley shoould be spell- 
ed b-o-o-s-t. To be a "booster" does 
not imply the necessity of going out 
on the street corner and advertising 
our college with a band and the flare 
of red light. What we do want and 
what we have a right to expect from 
each and every student is to go out 
and talk Lebanon Valley, tell about 
her fine qualities. Start the spirit 
of Lebanon Valley floating through 
the atmosphere so fast that prospec- 
tive students will place our alma 
mater at the head of all the eastern 
colleges when considering that ques- 
tion which must eventually be de- 
cided. So, student, absorb some of 
that, boosting spirit which is now 
more or less dormant and go out and 
talk, talk, talk Lebanon Valley to 
everyone friend and foe alike until 
the people of Pennsylvania and other 
states will awaken to the fact that 



ipijUflkosmtan Utterarg ^flriety 
of 

idrbattmt Ualley (Eollfije 
miupsta tltr tumor of ljtwr urrHrnrr 
at its 

Jtetg-stxtl) AttmwrrBary 
iFriitaii rurtttttg. iflag ammo 
ntnptrrn Ijim&rro ana thirtrnt 
at rtgfyt n'rlnrk 
iatglr (Cnnamiatoru, 



L. V. C. is a factor to be considered 
in school activities. 

Alumni, are you doing all in your 
power to advance the school of your 
choice? Do you recall some of the 
promises you made before gradua- 
tion, promises of financial assistance 
promises, to doing all you could to 
send students to these hall? Have 
you done your share? Have you kept 
all of your well made promises? If 
not begin right now. The alumni of 
any instiution is its. bggest asset. If 
for any reason their support should 
falter or fail it is only a question 
of time until their alma mater will 
be struggling and foundering in the 
mud and dirt of discouragement and 
ruin. 

Friends are you giving us the 
financial support we deserve? Loy- 
alty to you should be spelled 
m-o-n-e-y. We appreciate all you 
have done for us in the past, but 
until we reach our goal in securing 
a large endowment fund and raise 
enough money for our much need- 
ed gymnasium we cannot expect to 
compete successfully with other 
schools. 

Student, alumnus, friends talk, 
boost and work for Lebanon Valley 
Send us. students, and your sup- 
port and send your money. Let 
us all begin right now with a great 
big "boost." 



Base Ball 

(Continued from page 1) 



WASHINGTON GAME. 

Our first real victory in the South 
came when our team defeated Wash- 



ington College at Chestertown, Md., 
by a score of 9-0. The fact that 
they had lost to Deyaware state, the 
day previous, made it imperative in 
their minds that the Maryland game 
be a victory. 

But the opposing team had been 
playing good ball, winning from 
John Hopkins the Saturday before and 
a struggle was necessary for us to 
win was necessary to win. As the 
local players expressed it "Leban- 
on Valley had things well in hand 
from the start, "Little pitched 
great ball, allowing his opponents 
four hits and letting only one man 
on base by balls. This same team 
won from us last year and so was 
pretty confident of victory. 

In the first inning the ball wai 
started rolling. Snavely hit out a 
single and after stealing second was 
brought heme by Statton-s. two bag- 
ger. And throughout the whole 
game we kept continually pounding 
out hits, which meant runs. In the 
ninth inning five runs were made. 
Spangler found the pitchers curves 
during the game, having three hits. 
Score: 

LEBANON VALLEY. 

R. H. O. A. E. 

Spangler, If 1 3 

I. Lyter, 3b 1 2 2 

Snavely, lb 2 1 13 1 

T. Lyter, c 7 

Statton, rf 2 2 2 

Dearolf, 2b 1 4 

Stickell, ss 2 1 2 1 

Lerew, cf 1 1 1 

Little, p 2 2 6 

Totals 9 10 27 1 4 2 



COLLEGE NEWS 



WASHINGTON. 

R. H. O. A. E. 

Wallace, ss 1 2 

Meekina, 3b 1 4 5 

Garrett, cf 1 

Hely, rf 

Pearson, c...... 5 

Lewis, 2b 3 4 1 

Frampton, If ... . 1 1 

Usilton, lb 1 12 2 

Eown, p . .■ 1 2 

Biddle, p 

Totals 42713 3 

ROCK HILL GAME 

The last game of the series on our 
team's Southern trip, was played 
with Rock Hill College at Ellicot 
City, Md. This game was tne most 
hotly contested of any on the trip 
and it was only by hard work on our 
team's part that we are able to re- 
fer to this game as a victory. This 
final score, 3-2, shows the nature of 
the contest. 

Little won his second victory in 
two days here, pitching a masterful 
game. He is greatly to be praised 
on account of the game he pitched, 
after twirling the day before to such 
good effect. The runs that we made 
were earned runs and it took hits 
to score them. Little really won his 
own game, in the seventh inning 
when with two men on base, he hit 
out a two-base hit, scoring Dearolf 
and Lereu. Dearolf seemed to like 
to hit the ball, having three* clean 
hits out of four times at bat. Stickell 
in the sixth inning made a catch that 
was the most sensational seen since 
the beginning of the season. 

Schmidiger, the opposing twirler, 
was the best team had batted against 
since the Dickinson game, and the 
hits that were made were kept well 
scattered. Score: 

L. V 1 2 — 3 

Rock Hill ..00020000 — 2 

THE SOCIAL HOUR. 

The Wednesday evening Social 
Hour continues to be a success. 
Every minute of the time is taken 
up and peal after peal of laughter 
is heard issuing from the parlors. 
Last Wednesday the amusement took 
the form of an "indoor track meet." 
The first feature was a "relay race." 
Five boys and girls lined up on one 
side against five on the other side. 
Each were given a piece of cake and 
during the eating of it were to talk 
and whistle. The side that succeed- 
ed in doing both quickest and best 
Won the race. The "Tug of War" 
Was the next entered. A boy and a 
Sirl at each end of a cord-string 
with a raisin in the middle. They 
had to eat the string in to the 
r aisins. Of course the hands could 
n ot be used. This was great fun. 
A "hundred yard dash," pushing 
Pennies over the floor with tke nose, 
Jumping for doughnuts on strings, 
Measuring for the biggest feet and 
Pleasuring grins were other sports. 
r he hour soon sped around and was 
v °ted a great success. 



CHAPEL TALKS. 

Dr. J. P. Landis, Ph. D., president 
of Bonebrake Theological Seminary 
spoke in chapel on Monday, April 
21. He gave a very interesting ac- 
count of his experience during the 
Dayton flood. He told of his at- 
tempt to reach his daughter's home, 
and how his son finally rescued her 
and her family by taking them from 
a second story window into a boat. 
He sketched a vivid picture of the 
devastation and ruin that has come 
upon the fair city of Dayton. 

He said, "Nobody can make you 
understand the desolation. Mud! 
mund ! five or six inches thick every- 
where! The engineers calculate that 
40,000 tons of mud and smaller 
debris covered Dayton. This mud 
came from the denuded farms in the 
counties above us. The soil was lit- 
erally washed away. 

"The city was cut off from all 
water, electric and gas supply. We 
were put under martial law and the 
curfew rang at six o'clock. You had 
to have a pass to get from one part 
of the city to another. If you had 
none you were given a shovel and 
put to work cleaning up." 

He said that some of our church 
officers were marooned in our office 
building from Tuesday until Friday 
morning with almost nothing to eat. 

Dr. Landis said, "The most touch- 
ing thing to me personally was the 
alacrity, the heartiness, with which 
the outside world responded to our 
need. The expectation is mat Day- 
ton will not only rise from its ashes 
and mud but that it will rise to 
greater beauty and efficiency." 

On Tuesday morning Dr. Andrew 
Johnson was with us again in 
chapel. He told us some more of 
his jokes. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



Prof. F. L. Johnson made a busi- 
ness trip to Lebanon on Saturday. 

Hon. A. S. Kreider, a trustee of 
the college, made his maiden speech 
in Congress last week. 



vCebanon 2/allei/ 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

a?id Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 



Write for catalogue 

ttev. S. *D. Sossard, President 
nv Hie, Pa. 



ITS 



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A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 



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WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
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American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
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COLLEGE NEWS 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 
East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at 

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Quantity * < " Quality 
Main Street 



"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




ALUMNI. 

Miss Nellie Buffington, '00, was 
elected Young Women's Secretary of 
the Women's Missionary Association 
of the East Pennsylvania Confer- 
ence. 

Mrs. A. E. Shroyer, '00, was re- 
elected Recording Secretary of the 
Women's Missionary Association of 
the East Pennsylvania Conference. 

Miss Reba Lehman, '00, left on 
Monday for Spokane AVashington. 
She is to have charge of the city 
library at that place. 

Prof. Max Lehman, '07, of Balti- 
more, spent Sunday in town with his 
parents, Dr. and Mrs. Lehman. 

Dr. I. H. Albright, '76, of Middle- 
town, will deliver a lecture at Swa- 
tara Hill chuich on May third. His 
subject will be, "The Pioneers of the 
United Brethren Church." 

Prof. C. C. Peters, of the depart- 
ment of Philosophy and Education, 
is sick, suffering with erysipelas. 

The following alumni have been 
honored by being placed on the Com- 
mittee for General Conference. The 
Conference will be held in DeCator, 
Illinois, in May: 

Educational, G. D. Gossard, A. P. 
Funkhouser and H. H. Baish; Cor- 
respondence, J. A. Lyter; Memoirs, 
\Y. O. Jones, J. E. Lehman; Home 
Missions, W. H. Washinger; Itiner- 
ancy, J; \Y. Owen; Nominations, A. 
P. Funkhouser, H. E. Miller; Rules 
of Order and Order of Business, I. 
E. Runk; Superintendency, D. D. 
Lowery: 



Standard Quality 

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we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment, 
Catalogue Free. 

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2 6.130 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YORK 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and CENTS' 
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At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffc Shoes 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 

Faber Stengle, '15, is substituting 
tor Prof. Frank Haeston, assistant 
principal of the Oberlin High School. 

Miss Irene Hershey, of Progress, 
who has been sick for lae past six 
weeks will be unable to resume her 
studies for the present year. 

President G. D. Gossard was in 
New York last week looking after 
the interests of the college. 

Mr. Ressler, of Shamokin, visited 
his son, Ivan K., last week. 

Miss Belle Orris, '15, visited her 
home at Steelton for a few days. 

L. A. Rodes, '14, went to York last 
Wednesday to hear Grand Opera. 

G. A. Richie, '13, made a business 
trip to New York and Philadelphia 
last week. 

Harry Ulrich, '13, spoke in the 
Penbrook U. B. Church on Sunday 
night. 

Katharine Nissley, of Hershey, 
visited her sister, Mrs. Violet Freed. 

Miss Velma Heindel, '13, will give 
her graduating recital May eighth in 
the Engle conservatory. 

Wm. C. Carl, '15, spent Sunday at 
his home in Tower City. 

Mr. Landis Klinger, '13, visited 
in Philadelphia over Sunday. 

Misses Ryland and Quigley spent 
Sunday in Palmyra visiting friends. 

Miss Clippinger, '13, visited her 
brother in Harrisburg on Sunday. 



W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 
H. F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, Fa 

~WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa 

For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO- 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St. Annville, Pa, 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

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Chips 

LEBANON. PA. 



RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy"s" 

OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

A EULE 

-Put this down as a rule," says. Dr. Bardeen 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a Hist debt." , , . .^n-' 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found othcrs-the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en 
ergy of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our \\ors 
along this line will be continued as hopeful'? 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we fcna 
that most of our good, strong applicants were t» 
one time inexperienced in securing positirns. 

Everv vear since 1905 we have been in neei" 1 
more applicants to fill the best. positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school wot a- 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



PHILOKOSMIAN ANNIVERSARY NUMBER 



COLLEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, May 6, 1913 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the pyst office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879 




. 22 



PHILO AGAIN UNFURLS BANNER 

AND WORTHILY ACQUITS ITSELF 
ON FORTYVSIXTH ANNIVERSARY 



In the form of the anniversary ex- 
ercises of the Philokosmian Literary 
Society, Friday evening, May second, 
marked the culmination and crown- 
ing glory of many weeks of untiring 
effort and unflagging zeal. Both the 
speakers and those in charge of 
preparations felt amply repaid for 
their labor when a well filled house 
showed the interest of alumni, stu- 
dents and friends in this happy and 
joyful occasion. Lebanon Valley and 
Philo were honored on that day by 
many visitors from far and near who 
expressed sincere admiration and 
praise for our college and its several 
departments. 

Engle Conservatory and Philo Hall 
were beautifully and at the same 
time simply and tastefully decorat- 
ed. A feature of the decorations in 
the conservatory being the dog wood 
blossoms and the Philokosmian ban- 
ner in the form of an electrical dis- 
play. Philo Hall was beautiful with 
its decorations of pennants and Philo 
colors. 

The music, rendered by the Acad- 
emy of Music Orchestra, could not 
have been of a finer quality, while 
the appearance of the orchestra in 
evening dress added much to the dig- 
nity and attractiveness of the occa- 
sion. 

Shortly after the large crowd "had 
gathered, the orchestra started the 
strains of Losey's march entitled 
"United Liberty." During the ren- 
dition of this march the speakers 
were ushered upon the rostrum, amid 
the loud applause of the vast audi- 
ence. This well rendered number 
was followed by a second, which was 
an overture by Van Flatow, entitled 
"Stradella." Rev. B. F. Daugherty, 
D.D., then delivered the invocation, 
after which the literary program was 
rendered. This was of tne nlgh- 
est possible type, interspersed at 
times by a well received musical 
number which kept it from becom- 




M. H. Wert 



ing to the least degree monotonous. 

The first speaker was Mark H. 
Wert, '13, who delivered the Presi- 
dent's Address in a masterful and 
entertaining manner. 

The audience was then favored 
with a vocal solo by Geo. F. Botts, 
'14, whose ability as a singer is well 
known both at school and through- 
out many parts o f the state. Hen- 
rion's "Le Muleties De Tanagone" 
was received with great applause. 

Palmer F. Roberts, '13, then de- 
livered his oration, "Message of 
Heredity and Environment," in a 
manner which reflects great success 
to himself and to' his society. Mr. 
Roberts presented a fine oration, and 
held his listeners spellbound. 

At this point the program was 
varied by a reading by Victor D. 
Mulhollen, '13. His reading, "Gor- 
don's Reprieve," was well selected, 
and so well rendered that those pres- 
ent could feel almost the same fire 
and emotion that burned within 
Gordon's soul as he made his wild 



ride to the fort in order to deliver 
his message. 

"Drink to Me Only With Thine 
Eyes" was then rendered by the 
Philo Quartette, and was received 
with hearty applause. Those com- 
posing the quartette were Landis R. 
Klinger, 13; Geo. F. Botts, '14; Edw. 
H. Smith, '14; and L. A. Rodes, '14. 

The second oration on the pro- 
gram, The Dawn, was delivered by 
Mr. Richie, '13, in a highly com- 
mendable manner. Mr. Richie well 
demonstrated his ability as an ora- 
tor, and ended by making an elo- 
quent plea for America to do her 
duty as leader among nations. 

Another pleasing feature of the 
program was a violin solo by Philo 
A. Statton, '15, who rendered Dedla's 
"Souvenir." To the outburst of ap- 
plause which followed Mr. Statton 
replied with the "Sextette from 
Lucia." 

Last but not least of the literary 
production was a eulogy on Clara 
Barton by John F. Leininger, 13. Mr. 
Leininger's production was highly 
literary and showed every phase of 
originality. 

While the orchestra rendered a se- 
lection entitled "Love of Liberty," 
the crowd proceeded to Philo Hall 
where refreshments were served to 
all in the splendidly decorated hall. 

D. Ellis Zimmerman, '14, had 
charge of the refreshments, and D. 
Leonard Reddick, '14, of the decora- 
tions. 



PRESIDENT'S ADDRESS 



Ladies and Gentlemen: 

It is our highest delight and privi- 
lege to welcome you most sincerely 
and cordially to the forty-sixth an- 
niversary exercises of the Philokos- 
mian Literary Society. We appre- 
ciate beyond measure, the interest 
which your presence here manifests. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



You have doubtless come to ex- 
press your natural appreciation of 
students and friends of Lebanon Val- 
ley. College. Many of you have been 
looking with increased interest, to 
these "lovers of order," by whom 
the principles of Philokosmian have 
been handed down to us, revisit the 
scenes of former days, now cherish- 
ed in your halls of memory, and re- 
new the spirit of fraternal associa- 
tion of former days. 

Let us now turn to our motto, 
"Esse quam videri," "To be rather 
than seem." 

An anniversary of an organization 
is always concomitant with a period 
of meditation, reflection and thought. 
Therefore let us consider "The Value 
of an Ideal." 

Ideals are the stepping-stones to 
higher things, and the measure of a 
man's life is the range of interests 
he makes his own. Ours is a won- 
derful heritage. For this world in 
which we live is established through 
wisdom, founded on truth, govern- 
ed by law, clothed in beauty, crown- 
ed with beneflcience. The business of 
a man is to open his mind, to under- 
stand . that perfect wisdom, to ap- 
preciate that wondrous truth, to re- 
spect that universal law, to admire 
that radiant beauty, to praise that 
infinite beneficence. 

Humanity, of which we are a part, 
has brought forth great men and 
glorious deeds. It has formed lan- 
guages, and reared civilizations; it 
has expressed its ideals and aspira- 
tions on canvass and stone; it has 
uttered its joys and sorrows, its hopes 
and fears, in music and poetry. 

True ideals are presented through 
reason and reflection. The moral 
ideal is a product of reason appre- 
hending our social environment, and 
our relation to it. Reason affirms the 
reality of persons and institutions, 
and at the same time, declares that 
we have no reality or worth apart 
from them. The ideal which reason 
presents is therefore the realization 
of ourselves in and through our rec- 
ognition of the rights and interests 
of our fellows, and our response to 
the claims of those institutions and 
customs which promote the common 
social good. 

The moral ideal in its appeal will 
always present itself in two con- 
crete and opposite but complimentary 
aspects, sympathy and individuality. 
First it demands an expansion of 
our sympathy so that we shall in- 
clude the good of others in the good 
we call our own. Act so as to use 
humanity, whether in your person, 
or in the person of another, always 
as an end, never merely as a means. 
If our ideal thus expands us in sym- 
pathy and aspirations and endeavor, 
until it makes us sharers in a uni- 
versal life, and promoters of a world- 
wide social good, that nothing hu- 
man remains alien to us, then no 
social interest appeals to our support 
in vain. But remember our ideal is 



definite and limits and confines our 
actual service to the particular place 
which we occupy, and the precise 
functions which we are best fitted to 
perform. 

If our ideal is a moral one, it will 
accept nothing which does not in- 
crease the efficiency, freedom and 
power of the particular life it en- 
ters. Whether it is a whist party 
or a prayermeeting; a Browning 
Club or a dance ;^ tne question that 
is put before you is not merely is 
it good or bad in itself, but for me, 
with my station, my duties, my op- 
portunities, my sjtate of body and 
mind, the engagement in question 
will be a hindrance or a help to my 
highest individual aeveiopment and 
largest social service. 

The man with a true ideal knows 
no such thing as defeat. Defeat is 
not found in his vocabulary. He is 
possessed of courage and persever- 
ance, though fates may seem to have 
decreed against him. For he knows 
if he ever reaches or approximates 
his ideal, it will be not on flowery 
beds of ease. He will see many who 
have started with great intentions 
but have fallen by the wayside, their 
life is wretched as rar as the ful- 
fillment of its purpose is concerned. 
He is often dissolved in tears and 
prayers for himse.f and others. But 
faith is his sheet anchor, and by the 
help of God he is resolved never to 
be driven from his vantage ground. 
As you cannot explain the secret of 
a tear by chemical analysis, or the 
process of growth, so you cannot ex- 
plain the unswerving courage and 
faith of the man with an ideal. He 
seems to be buried in something 
which is nig?i superhuman. He 
realizes that: 

Lives of great men all remind us 

We can make our lives sublime, 
And, departing, leave behind us 

Footprints on the sands of time. 
Footprints, that perhaps another, 

Sailing o'er life's solemn main, 
A forlorn and shipwrecked brother, 

Seeing, shall take heart again. 

To him the soul is dead that 
slumbers, has no struggles no activi- 
ties. To him there is no returning 
to dust. The angel of death never 
passes over his life. 

Not enjoyment, and not sorrow, 

Is his destined end or way; 
But to act that each tomorrow, 

Finds him farther than today. 

To the true idealist there is no 
such a thing as yesterday and to- 
morrow. All is present with him. 
When he reflects over the past he 
does it with reverence and that he 
may know it more thoroughly. The 
end of all is the "summum bonum," 
the supreme good. 

The man with an ideal does not 
always follow the line of least re- 
sistance. He follows the natural or 
universal law, though it lead into 
the meadows and over the Alps. The 



meadows must be penetrated and the 
Alps crossed. While some go astray, 
each after his own devices, — some 
vainly striving after reputation, oth- 
ers turning aside arter gain exces- 
sively, others after riotous living and 
wantonness. He prays as Cleanthus: 
"O Zeus, Giver of all things, who 
dwellest in dark clouds and rulest 
over the thunder, deliver men from 
their foolishness. Scatter it from 
their souls, and grant them to ob- 
tain wisdom, for by wisdom thou 
dost rightly govern all things; that 
being honored we may repay thee 
with honor, singing thy works with- 
out ceasing, as it is right for us to 
do. For there is no greater thing 
than this, either for mortal men or 
the Gods, to sing rightly the uni- 
versal law" "Esse quam videri" rath- 
er be than seem. 

We the Philokosmians or "lovers 
of order" have been guided by these 
principles for forty-six years, and 
trust this anniversary will be a step- 
ping-stone, not only to a greater 
Philokosmian; but aiso to an in- 
creased lustre of the fair name of 
Lebanon Valley. 



MESSAGE OF HEREDITY AND 
ENVIRONMENT. 

In this twentieth century of in- 
dustrial and social advancement, of 
scientific determination of all sub- 
jects for study, many voices are 
heard in the land uttering their 
messages concering the personal 
efficiency of each man aa an individ- 
ual and as a member of society. 

Each message is made to ring 
clear and strong, and with the more 
intensity as the social consciousness 
is centered on cause rather than on 
effect. Even a pastor in his pulpit is 
aware of an increase in attendance 
as scon as his messages makes an ap- 
plication of Christian principles to 
practical affairs-business, social and 
home conditions. 

Of all these loud, clearly ringins: 
messages, none is more appealing and 
more gripping in its power than the 
message of heredity and environment 
Upon these depend all physical con- 
ditions, moral institutions and social 
influences both intellectual and reli- 
gious. Especially is this true in 
the light of modern biological and 
s.ocialogical investigations. Since 
such facts as these have been re- 
vealed it becomes binding upon so- 
ciety, to concentrate more of its en- 
ergies upon improving the race 
through the control of environment 
and heredity. 

"Evil communications corrupt 
good manners," says the Bible, and 
just as certainly as an evil environ- 
ment degrades, a good environment 
elevates, for good communications 
will improve bad manners. 

Both King Edward of England and 
Emperor William of Germany had 
English mothers but because of a 
different environment King Edward 



COLLEGE NEWS 



was a typical Englishman in his 
ideals, habits, and personal appear- 
ance, while Emperor William was a 
through going German. As human 
nature is so highly susceptible to 
eternal influences, it is very prob- 
able that if theirs had been inter- 
changed from child-hood the English 
king would have been the thorough 
going German, and limperor Wil- 
liam the typical Englishman. 

No doubt most of us know of edu- 
cated, scholarly Americans holding 
positions of honor in the, literary 
wcrld whose parents were humble 
peasants of Europe, unable even to 
read or write. Yet we see their 
children have succeeded in command- 
ing respect and admiration because 
of their ability, now if they had the 
same environmen as their parents, 
who would gainsay that the ! y' too 
would havq been but simple Euro- 
pean peasants. Their success, and 
their achievements have been due to 
their environment. 

Even inccrrigibles in the reforma- 
tory who before had resisted both 
persuasion and punishment, have 
yielded to systematic physical train- 
ing and scientific feeding. What an 
arraignment of twentieth century 
social methods and established edu- 
cational values is this! It has been 
truely said that the most eloquent 
speech cannot arraign modern con- 
ditions more terribly than the Ion 
ly cry of a child. Listen! A few 
days ago a committee was investigat- 
ing the laboring condition of chil- 
dren in a near by city and what did 
they find? They found among oth- 
ers a child but three years old at 
work. "How long have you been 
employed? one member asked the 
child. "Ever since I was," came the 
simple answer. These words coming 
so naturally from the lips of this 
child are a more scathing expose of 
its environment, its poverty, the 
wolfish greed for profits, and the 
terrible industrial conditions, gen- 
erally than any novelist, dramatist, 
orator could frame even in the tragic 
diction of a Sophocles or Shakespeare. 

Listen again to the bitter wail 
coming from American youth, work- 
ing in the coal mines, cotton mills 
and factories of the land, without 
the right to play, the right to educa- 
tion, and the right to childhood. In 
zero weather, amid the choking dust 
of the great coal breakers, scores of 
little boys are seen bending over the 
streams of coal with bleecing fingers 
picking out the slate. And scores of 
others come out of great factories 
early in the morning after working 
all night. 

This cruelty and wickedness 
touches every phase of human life. 
It affects the very structure of civili- 
zation, the home problem, the school 
problem, the religious problem, and 
the social problem. The child is 
stunted in body, mind and soul; un- 
fitted for assuming the responsibili- 




P. F. Roberts 



ties of manhood and prevented from 
making his needed contribution to 
the wealth of the world. By so much 
is society the loser, and the race im- 
poverished. 

We of today are absolute masters 
of the future. We have in our con- 
trol the influences of heredity and 
environment and can change human 
nature just to the same extent as 
we have changed both plant and 
animal nature. 

The patience of man In studying 
the plant, selecting the seed, and 
caring for its environment has culti- 
vated the old fashioned, Spice Pink, 
into the Lawson Carnation Pink, 
one of the most beautiful flowers in 
the world. And in the vegetable 
kingdom the same kind of skill has 
produced from hard, unpalatable, 
apples the most delicious fruit 
though it has taken effort after ef- 
fort, year after year and failure af- 
ter failure to encourage and change 
nature and bring about such victory. 
Yet just as the sour, hard, apple has 
been cultivated into the delicious, 
Northern Spy, just as the seeds have 
been eliminated from the sour 
orange and the appetizing navel 
orange produced, just as the magni- 
ficient roses and pinks have been 
evolved by changing their environ- 
ment, so we can change human na- 
ture, and produce future citizens by 
the same skillful control of heredity 
and environment. Now in the face 
of these facts why do we perpetuate 
a system that places the parents of 
the next generation in such environ- 
ment? Why do we permit boys and 
girls in the plastic period of their 
lives to enter the ranks of labor? 
Why do we permit the adulteration 
cf food and milk? Why do we per- 
mit underfeeding and overworking of 
men and women? Why do we allow 
human beings to be herded together 
in tenements as no ranchman would 
herd his cattle? Why do we license 
the commercializing or vice and 
crime? Why do we permit those 



conditions which produce sickness 
and sin. 

God hag planted the rsed of Di- 
vinity in every mortal being, but he 
has left it with man himself to 
nc.irish and develop tha: seed, culti- 
vate the soil and perfect the plant 
There is nothing we can not do if 
we but follow the rPht laws for its 
accomplishment. 

Let us then heed the teachings 
of heredity and environment, accept 
the facts of science, as shown in the 
perfecting of plant and animal, and 
guided by these, proceed to build for 
the future. 

Let us enforce laws against vice 
and crime, raze to the ground unsani- 
tary tenements, distribute the popu- 
lation of conjested districts, make it 
unprofitable to adulterate feed, un- 
lawful to license diseased persons to 
marry. By these means we can 
transmute human nature We can 
give to man a better environment 
and heredity. Then we can accom- 
plish as much for man as for plant 
and animal. Then we can produce 
the consummate flower cf manhood 
and womanhood in body, mind, and 
soul. 



GORDON'S REPRIEVE. 

"Gordon's Reprieve," by Gertrude 
Poland Greble. A synopsis of the 
story is the following: At the begin- 
ning of the campaign with the In- 
dians, the War Department had or- 
dered a battalion of infantry to the 

vicinity of the R Agency. To 

this out-of-the-way pocket among the 
hills the little force had accordingly 
made its way. Appeals to the fort 
for reinforcements had not been 
heeded, and now with only five day3 
rations left, they had been told by a 
scout that in two days they were to 
be cut off by the Indians. A mes- 
senger must be sent to the fort for 
help. Colonel Bruce and Lieutenant 
Kane in conference determined, to 
send Richard Gordon. Gordon had- 
come into the regiment under excep- 
tionally pleasant circumstancs. He 
was put in command of a detachment 
but because of his physical inability 
to bear the sight of blood he had ut- 
terly failed. This opportunity was 
given to Gordon that he might wip 1 
out the stain and not be branded as 
a coward in the future. Goraon ac- 
cepted the offer and started at one" 1 
on the journey to deliver the mes- 
sage to the fort. It was hemmed in 
on three sides by jagged foot hills, 
on the fourth facing a reach of prai- 
rie, snow covered and unbroken, ex : 
cept for the indentations of the river 
bottom. As Gordon rode for ten 
miles along the river he was not dis- 
covered by the Indians But comini 
in sight of the fort he was spied and 
fired upon from all sides. Seeing the 
blood he became helpless but retain- 
ed his balance of mind With a last 
effort he fastened his dispatch case 



COLLEGE NEWS 



to the ring of the saddle and flung 
himself from the horse. The horse 
ran into the fort and the message 
was delivered. 



THE DAWN. 

"These are the times that try men's 
souls. The summer soldier and the 
sunshine patriot will in this crisis 
shrink from the service of his coun- 
try, but he that stands it now de- 
serves the love and thanks of man 
and woman." 

Thus Thomas Paine describes 
vividly the night of doubt and de- 
spair of the Revolutionary War 
through whose shadows no luminous 
ray of success shone. The month of 
November 1776 had been fraught 
with disasters. Fort Washington had 
been capitulated with a loss of three 
thousand of the best trained troops 
in the American army and the for- 
feiture of an immense quantity of 
artillery and small arms. Port Lee, 
on the opposite banks of the Hudson, 
became untenable. The surrender of 
these forts gave New York and Hud- 
son Valley into the hands of the 
enemy, and severed New England 
from the rest of the Colonies. 

With neither redoubts nor in- 
trenching tools to throw up pro- 
tecting fortifications, the position of 
the American army was precarious. 
Then Washington gathered his tired 
troops, ordered Lee to protect the 
rear, and began his remarkable re- 
treat through the Jerseys. Hasten- 
ing from Newark, he marched to 
Brunswick, where a defense of the 
Raritan was proposed; but when the 
hostile hosts approached, the Jer- 
sey and Maryland brigades whose 
terms of service expired that day, 
refused to stay or fight. The re- 
treat was again resumed with Tren- 
ton as the destination. Washington 
sent his baggage over the Delaware, 
and, reinforced by troops from Phila- 
delphia, turned to face the foe. But 
Washington could wage no fight, so 
he crossed the Delaware with Howe 
thundering at his heels. 

In this retreat, the patriot chief- 
tain was embarrassed and hampered 
by Lee, who pretended to misunder- 
stand the commander's orders, sent 
excuses, raised serious objections, 
trifled, argued and prevaricated. Not 
until the Jerseys were in the hands 
of the foe, the forces of Washing- 
ton crushed, Philadelphia in terror 
and tumult, and the colonies exposed 
to the unbridled and licentious im- 
pulses of a mercenary soldiery, was 
his nefarious career out short by the 
timely capture of hi s person. Mean- 
while three thousand citizens of 
New Jersey had accepted the proffer- 
ed amnesty of Howe and swor n al- 
legiance to the crown; the British 
army was knocking at the gates of 
Philadelphia; Congress had fled; 
Washington had but a handful of 
ragged, half-starved, heavy-hearted 
men. enfeebled by want and wounds. 




V. D. MVLHOLLEN 



vvnne Cnristmastioe was approach- 
ing tneie was in tne camp 01 tne 
patriots no animation, no cneer, no 
nope. 

ine darkest hour of night, its 
sombre snadows steeped in silence 
and hopelessness, has come, atout 
hearts have been quelled. But in 
the midst ot tnis abjection and de- 
spondency there are a lew brave 
hearts that ha\e net given up in 
utter despair and the bravest of 
tnese is the noble vvasnmgton. 

In the mean time tne British, sta- 
tioned at Brunswick, Princeton, 
Trenton and Bordertown, had ravag- 
ed New Jersey. Their mercenaries 
had plundered both Tory and Whig. 
They had destroyed in mere wanton- 
ness. Their libertinism knew no 
bounds for neither woman nor child 
was safe from indignity. Their 
evenings were spent in debauchery 
or the gayety of balls, and they lived 
with their mistresses in one long 
carousal. Thus feeling secure and 
safe in their shelter, the insolent in- 
vading foe became negligent of their 
defense. This negligence gave to 
the keenly observant Washington 
his opportunity. 

Realizing that the time has come 
for definite action, Washington de- 
termines that a stroke for liberty 
must fall on Christmas night. Gates, 
commanding the right wing, is to 
attack Count Donop at Burlington; 
Ewing, with the centre, will cross 
directly opposite Trenton, co-operate 
with Gates in preventing Donop from 
joining Ralle; Washington, leading 
the left, is to make the passage nine 
miles above and attack the Hessians 
at Trenton; Putman is to proceed 
from Philadelphia at the last mo- 
ment. 

The day for the concerted maneu- 
ver upon the British posts on the 
Delaware arrives. Success depends 
upon the execution of every detail of 
the proposed assault. It is a mo- 
mentous movement. If it fails, the 
cause of liberty dies. But Gates, dis- 



approving the position taken by 
Washington, turns nig back on dang- 
er, duty and honor and hastens away 
to intrigue with Congress. Putman, 
enjoying the comforts of the shel- 
tering City of Brotherly Love, re- 
fuses to set out upon what seems to 
him a foolhardy expedition. Cad- 
walader, who assumes command 
upon Gates' departure, marches to 
the river where he endeavors to 
cross. The rising tide throwing 
back the ice in heaps upon the Jer- 
sey shores prevents a landing. The 
men stand tor hours with their arms 
in hands waiting in vain for the 
floating ice to open a passage. Ewing 
dees net even make an effort to gain 
the opposite shore. 

The success of the expedition now 
depends upon the commander-in- 
chief. His majestic courage rises to 
the occasion and upon being in- 
formed that he can expect no 
help from Gates or Putman, he 
writes to one of the gener- 
als: "Notwithstanding the dis- 
couraging accounts) I have received 
from Colonel Reed of what might be 
expected upon the operations below, 
I am determined, as the night is 
favorable, to cross the river and 
make the attack on Trenton in the 
morning." 

About three o'clock in the after- 
noon the order is given to advance. 
The men march in silence, the snow 
creaking beneath their foot-steps, 
which may be traced by the blood 
oozing from frozen feet. But not a 
murmur is heard. The van reaches 
the Delaware as the sun de- 
scends behind the dark blue 
mountains. The men stand on 
the banks, shivering, with the frost 
biting and tingling feet and fingers, 
awaiting ther trip over the turbulent 
waters. The crossing is hazardous 
for the current of the stream is 
swift and difficult to stem while the 
ice crushes and grinds beneath the 
prows of the passing boats. Then 
the snow begins to fall making the 
transit so laborious and ardous that 
it is three o'clock in the morning 
before all have crossed. 

Three o'clock and Trenton nine 
miles away! It is too late for a sur- 
prise. But there is no pause. "For- 
ward! March!" The men begin 
their toilsome tramp through the 
falling sleet and hail, their bleeding 
feet slipping at every step. At Bir- 
mingham the army is divided. Sulli- 
van continues along the river. Wash- 
ington proceeds into Pennington 
Road. 

It is now day. Still the Hessians 
slumber unmindful of approaching 
foe. The falling sleet muffles the 
sound of tramping feet and deadens 
the rumble of the cannon-carriage 
wheels. It beats violently in the 
faces of the advancing Americans, 
who are stiff and blue with cold. 
The outskirts of Trenton are reach- 
ed in safety and without discovery. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Every man is thrilled and tremulant 
The time for the attack has come. 

The two columns charge simul- 
taneously. The drowsing pickets ar? 
swept away. The slumbering He - 
sians, awakened by the shots, tum- 
ble cut of their barracks and at- 
tempt to form in battle array. Con- 
fusion and disorder reign. The half- 
formed regiments advance toward the 
Americans. They are driven back. 
Though Ralle endeavors to rally Lis 
men, retreat is the only alternative. 
Two avenues lay open: one over the 
bridge which crosses the creek; the 
other, the road to Brunswick. Sul- 
livan's attack is so spirited that the 
Hessians are driven apast the road 
leading to the bridge. They turn 
toward Brunswick but Washington 
intercepts them with Hand's rifle- 
men. By a determined charge they 
can cut their way througn. But as 
they hesitate Ralle falls mortally 
wounded. Then the Hessians sur- 
render. The battle is over. The vic- 
tory is won. Within three weeks 
Washington had rallied the frag- 
ments of a defeated and broken 
army. He had fought two success- 
ful battles, taken over two thousand 
prisoners, wrested New Jersey from 
the grasp of the British. He had 
frightened their generals and com- 
manded their respect. 

The long night had passed. It 
was morning. Dawn had come at 
last. The drear night of sadness had 
broken into a morn of rejoicing. 
And the patriots had cause to rejoice, 
as the effects of this victory cannot 
be estimated. The rructuant hopes 
of the people were revived. The 
country awoke from its slumber of 
indifference to a consciousness of 
national strength and unanimity. In 
Prance, the victory created a greater 
interest in behalf of the colonies. 
Many volunteers came to the aid 
of the struggling Americans. Mar- 
quis de Layfette bade his young wife 
adieu, fitted out a ship and sailed 
away to fight for the cause of lib- 
erty. From the coffers of France 
flowed a golden stream into the im- 
poverished treasury of the Ameri- 
cans. Without this sympathy, this 
help, this aid, independence could 
never have been won. 

Other nations received their laws 
from conquerors. But a people rock- 
ed in the cradle of liberty, reared 
to hardship, inheriting nothing but 
their rights, could not quail beneath 
the rod of oppression. The foreign 
fleets and alien armies employed to 
silence murmurs and complaints stir- 
red the germs of resistance. From 
the usurpations of tyranny, the re- 
public received its birth. Against 
it the tempests beat, around it the 
storm raged and spent its fury in 
vain. Breathing the keen air of lib- 
erty, it stood upright, looking out 
upon the expanded horizon, full- 
statured and equal among the peo- 
ple of the earth. 

No other race has a country more 




G. Ritchie 



worthy of its respect and love. Where 
is there another land so magnificent 
in extent? Its winding rivers offer 
broad highways to commerce. Its 
prairies are clothed with green pas- 
tures. Its mountain ranges are fill- 
ed with rich deposits that invite ex- 
ploitation. God has placed upon its 
head a diadem and has laid at its 
feet power and wealth beyond meas- 
ure. It is the sweet land of lib- 
erty, land when; men died that free- 
dom might have birth. From its 
sun-kissed hills and rugged rocks, 
from its murmuring rills and exten- 
sive woods, the music swells the 
breeze with: "My Country! 'tis of 
thee, I sing:" 

"There's freedom at thy gates and 
rest 

For earth's down-trodden and ap- 
prest, 

A shelter for the hunted head. 
For the starved laborer toil and 
bread." 

"Here freedom's trumpets one last 

rally sound: 
Here to the breeze its blood-stained 

flag is tossed. 
America, last hope of man and truth, 
Thy name must through all coming 

ages be 

The badge unspeakable of shame and 
ruth, 

Or glorious pledge that man through 

truth is free. 
This is thy destiny: the choice is 

thine 

To lead all nations and outshine 
them all." 



MISS CLARA BARTON. 

The drama of life presents to our 
minds characters unnumbered who 
play their part, are seen by man, 
and, as the morning dew, soon fade 
from his sight. Some play their part 
for honor's crown, some for wealth, 
while others pursue it out of devo- 
tion to a cause. History has writ- 
ten high upon its scroll the names 



of Washington, Gladstone, Lincoln, 
and others — the product of every 
sphere of activity. We look upon 
Washington and laud him as a great 
general, style him the Father of a 
Nation; we recognize in Lincoln the 
Great Emancipator, and rightly re- 
member Gladstone as an imperial 
Statesman. But if we turn the pages 
and search the records of the city of 
Oxford, Massachusetts, in the year 
1821, a character of a different type 
comes upon the stage; not a states- 
man, not an emancipator, and not 
the iron-willed general, but the 
Philanthropist Miss Clara Barton. 

Miss Barton's childhood days, as 
compared with the childhood of most 
youths, were brief, and passed by as 
a summer's cloud. Her education 
was directed by her two sisters and 
her physical training by her brother. 
At ten years of age she attended 
Colonel Richard Stone's private 
boarding school. Here she advanced 
rapidly, notwithstanding her one 
peculiarity — an extreme bashfulness, 
a characteristic which remained with 
her throughout life. As she herself 
said in later years: "To this day I 
would rather stand behind the lines 
of artillery at Antietam, or cross the 
pontoon-bridge under fire at Fred- 
ericksburg than to be expected to 
preside at a public meeting." But 
life with her was not being lived in 
its fullest sense unless she was per- 
forming some constructive work, 
working out some ideals and making 
them realities in her own life; weav- 
ing her own personality, body and 
soul into the life of another; as the 
life of a candle is consumed in its 
cause, so was sacrificed the life of 
Clara Barton to the social group of 
which she was a member. 

A serious illness of her brother 
became her first opportunity to act 
the part of a patient and loving 
nurse. Denying herself all the joys 
of the New England hills and 
streams; turning away from the com- 
panionship she had found in books, 
she remained for more than two 
years by his side. To minister to 
his wants was her delight, but what 
was pleasing to her peculiar nature 
was not beneficial to her, because the 
more she remained apart from so- 
ciety, the more bashful she grew, so 
that it became a question to her 
parents how to overcome the difficul- 
ty. Her mother consulted the phre- 
nologist, Fowler, an Oxford profes- 
sor of science who suggested that 
responsibility be placed upon her. 
Not yet sixteen years of age, she 
was chosen to teach the village 
school. The question, "Would she 
succeed?" then rose in the minds of 
them who knew her best. But the 
doubt soon disappeared, for one 
whose words are words of cheer, 
whose heart overflows with love for 
the child; the joy of whose pupils is 
her joy; to such a one the door of 
success stands open. When the term 
Continued on page 6 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieuas 



Issued weekly during 1 the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 



EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
flokknce mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 

EST A WAREHEIM '1(5 

Athletics 

PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 
PAUL STRICKLER '14 

Music 
G. F. BOTTS '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 



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Address all business communications 

to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Administra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITORIAL. 

This week the General Conference 
will meet at Decatur Illinois. Never 
in the history of the church has 
there been such great questions to 
come before this body, and never has 
the educational work of the church 
offered questions of such great pro- 
portion. 

Lebanon Valley College has been 
a great factor in the church for nearly 
fifty years, and now again will she 
be able to show her strength. Many 
of her alumni will sit in this delib- 
erating body and so we feel that our 
educational work is safe, for who 
of her loyal sons could think of pass- 
ing lightly or carelessly upon the 
educational interests. 

If church union comes to pass, we 
will need the best possible for our 
school to make it meet the needs of 
a greater constituency. If it does 
not come to pass, we will still need 
careful consideration for we have 
great problems which must be solved. 

We have asked for more territory, 
and if it is given us, we as members 
of the school, must rise up in our 
might and welcome it, and show that 
we are able to receive more. If it is 
not granted, we must not be downed, 
but we must rally and go forward at 
any cost. 

Two of our faculty are attending 
this conference, and we have pledged 
to them our confidence for we know 
that they have the school at heart. 
Many of our alumni will be there, 
and let us resolve to carry out to 
its greatest perfection any policy that 



J. F. Le^ninger 



they, with the rest of the body may 
see wise to outline for us. Let us 
push our cause, and not let the cause 
push us. 

If we do not receive what we want, 
shall we say that the conference is 
conservative or that they lack inter- 
est in our cause; or shall we put the 
blame on our own heads and say 
that we have misused or not used our 
opportunity. We are to blame for 
some things but now let us forget 
the "dead past" and pledge our loy- 
alty to coming causes. Let us with 
renewed interest go forward and ere 
long, we, under the superior director- 
ship of our president, will gain a 
momentum that will carry us for- 
ward to a lofty place. 

CLARA BARTON 

(Continued from page 5) 

had passed and the school-board at 
its last meeting awarded the prize 
for the best disciplined school to Miss 
Barton, she remonstrated, saying that 
there was no discipline in her school; 
but as a teacher, she was a child 
among children, and with such an 
instructor, obedience is voluntary on 
the part of the pupils. 

Her next experience as a teacher 
was at Bordentown, New Jersey, 
where she opened a free school. Be- 
ginning it with six students, it grew 
in 1854 to six hundred. Duties and 
responsibilities gathered upon her, 
until, broken in health, she had to 
seek different employment. After a 
short rest on the New England farm 
she went to Washington on a visit. 
With the aid of a relative in con- 
gress she was made head clerk in 
the Patent Office. Here she remain- 
ed as clerk until she was removed 
because of her anti-slavery senti- 
ments. 

While in the city she saw a regi- 
ment of soldiers from her own state 
of Massachusetts pass through from 
Baltimore. The soldiers were in 
poor condition; many of the sick 



and wounded were placed in the hos- 
pitals where she went to assist in 
caring for them. It was there that 
she caught the real inspiration of 
her life; and, in obedience to the 
advice given by Cariyle — To do the 
duty which lies nearest to you; that 
which you know to "oe a duty, — she 
cast her lot with the soldier. She 
asked herself, "What nobler way, if 
any, can 1 berve my Country and 
Humanity V" She communicated 
with the parents and friends of the 
sick and unfortunate, describing 
their condition. Within a week pro- 
visions of food, clothing and medi- 
cine were sent to her for the men. 
time distributed them as they were 
needed; the officials soon recognized 
the value of her services, and in this 
way she became the leader of a move- 
ment for bringing relief to the suf- 
fering soldiers in the front ranks of 
battle. In 1864 she was placed in 
charge of the hospitals of the James, 
and in '65 President Lincoln put her 
at the head of the forces in search for 
the missing men of the Union Armies. 

At the close of the Civil War she 
went to Europe and when the 
Franco-Prussian war broke out she 
took up the work again of caring for 
the sick and wounded. But in 
Europe the Red Cross Society was 
already an effective means of relief 
in the army. Twenty-two nations 
had already adopted this relief asso- 
ciation for times of crises. Miss Bar- 
ton saw the European armies accom- 
plish in relief-work in four months 
what the United States failed to do 
in four years. And as Lincoln de- 
termined on his visit to the New 
Orleans slave market, that if he 
would ever get a chance to strike 
that curse of slavery, he would strike 
it hard; so Miss Barton resolved that 
if she would ever get back to her own 
country she would make her people 
understand the Red Cross and the 
significance of its treaty. She re- 
turned in 1873 broken in health and 
could not present it before '77. She 
appealed to President Hayes, but it 
failed to pass. She then pleaded be- 
fore congress, but as it carried with 
it no political influence nor votes, 
it was again defeated. In 1881 she 
presented the matter again to Presi- 
dent Garfield, who asked Blaine to 
report it favorably to congress. Thus 
he did and the United States became 
the thirty-third nation to ratify the 
treaty of the Red Cross Society, 
which in America stands as a fitting 
memorial to her life. 

Her sincerity of purpose is plainly 
evident. From the time of her child- 
hood the heart of Clara Barton beat 
in true sympathy for humanity. As 
the spectroscope is sensitive to the 
minutely changing rays of the sun, 
so was the heart of this great woman 
touched by every expression of so- 
ciety which savored of suffering and 
want. And as her heart moved in 
sympathy, so increased her purpose 
and resolve to be one of the agents 



COLLEGE NEWS 




PHILOKOSMIAN LITERARY SOCIETY 1912-13 



through whom the woes of mankind 
would be lightened. Her success de- 
pended upon her ability to prove to 
the world that she represented a 
cause which would permanently bene- 
fit mankind. Respecting this ideal 
purpose she was unilke many per- 
sons of today who claim to be suc- 
cessful in certain spheres, but when 
we consider the cause they espouse, 
we see the selfishness of their pur- 
pose, their craze for wealth, and their 
utter disregard for the welfare and 
development of all the higher and 
nobler powers of their fellowmen. 
When a young girl in the home her 
cause was the comfort and well-be- 
ing of the individuals composing the 
home; especially is this true of her 
tender care of her brother. If she 
had not been representing a noble 
and unselfish cause she would not 
have confined herself for two years 
within so limited and secluded a 
sphere of activity. 

This same spirit of enthusiasm, de- 
votion and sacrifice she manifested in 
her life as a teacher, and, again, her 
success was bound up in the cause 
which she espoused, for it was only 
as her work would show constructive 
and lasting results that she would 
be judged. Her work in each school 
was a fitting tribute to her future 
greatness. Her purpose was not the 
accumulation of wealth, but her sat- 
isfaction came through the joy she 
found in moulding the character of 



the community in which she served. 
Society first, then her individual self, 
was her attitude toward life. To this 
end she directed all her energies; the 
result of which was the founding of 
the American National Red Cross So- 
ciety, of which sjje became the first 
president, an organization formed for 
the alleviation of the horrors of war; 
but it soon outgrew the purpose for 
which it was created, and became ac- 
tive, not only in war, but in times 
of famine, plague, fire and flood — 
wherever humanity raised the cry of 
distress, there this organization 
planted the embkm of a red cross on 
a white field, and sent a woman 

"Whose soul like the transparent air 
That robes the hills above, 
Though not of earth, encircles there 
All things with arms of love." 

If the life of Clara Barton did not 
show something more enduring than 
the external benefits which she 
brought to certain communities 
which were in distress, she would not 
continue to occupy her present posi- 
tion among the world's great philan- 
thropists. It was her intensity of 
purpose and the spirit revealed in 
attaining the objects which she had 
set before her. It was her obedience 
to a secret impulse of her own indi- 
vidual nature which men and wom- 
en of today admire in her life. This 
secret obedience Emerson styles 



"Heroism." Further, it was no hero- 
ism inspired by any false ideal, nor 
impelled by any selfish motive. No 
public rewards, nor golden medals 
from great men lured her into action, 
but it was the contentment found in 
the consciousness ol a great duty 
nobly done that was the controlling 
influence of her life. On the battle- 
field she showed an utter disregard 
of danger. In one engagement her 
clothing, though pierced by eleven 
bullets, and one soldier whom she 
was rescuing, shot dead in her arms, 
still she continued heedless of her 
own welfare. Such heroism is not 
that called forth to win the Carnegie 
medal, nor the plaudits or men, but 
that fostered in love, patriotism and 
an obedience to the voice of the 
Master, when He said "Love thy 
neighbor as thyself." 

In these remarks concerning the 
life of Clara Barton we see how she 
rose in influence and service from the 
village maiden to the place where — 
not as president of the United States, 
not as Queen of the British Empire, 
but as Healer of the Nations, she pos- 
sessed the throne of Love and Ser- 
vice, sacrificing all personal comforts, 
and now deserves the hignest tribute 
of all who love the country founded 
by our fathers; freed by the Revolu- 
tionary heroes; purged of slavery by 
the Civil War, and since maintained 
by a people conscious of the "Still 
small voice" which leads them on. 




COLLEGE NEWS 



PHILO VISITORS. 

The following are some of the 
visitors that attended the Philokos- 
mian Anniversary: Dr. B. F. Daugh- 
erty, '89, wife and son Carl; Dr. M. 
W. Brunner, '01, and wife; Prof. 
Walter Espenshade, '03; Prof. Dun- 
mire and Miss Dunmire, Mr. R. H. 
Lee, Miss Isabel Boger, Miss Eliza- 
beth Boger, Miss Sara Helms, '03, 
Miss Carrie Bachman, Miss Edna 
Blouch, Miss Deitzler, and Miss 
Ulrich, all of Lebanon; Mr. John K. 
Curry, Swatara Station; Prof. Oliver 
Butterwick, '12, and Prof. Dodd, 
Hershey; Miss Vivian Smith, Balti- 
more, Md.; Miss Edyth Denlinger, 
Intercourse; Miss Mary B. Nissley 
and Mr. Harry Longenecker, of Mid- 
dletown; Miss Florence Stewart, 
Cressona; Miss Dora Dice, York; Miss 
Lulu T ong, Miss Esther Long and 
Miss Pearl Lutz, of Shippensburg; 
Miss Emma Landes, Mifflintown; 
Miss R' ea Davis, Tremont; Mr. For- 
ie;1 S. Hensel, '12, Lykens; Mrs. H. 
F. Heintzelman, Chambersburg; Mr. 
Lester Snyder, Greencastle; Miss 
Mary Pastor, Harrisburg; Mr. Claire 
T'arnish, '12, Mechanicsburg; Miss 
Katharine Peters, Harrisburg; Miss 
Iona Kemmerly and Miss Susan Niss- 
ley, Columbia; Rev. C. E. Boughter, 
Oberlin; Rev. R. R. Rodes, Worm- 
leysburg; Rev. A. N. Horn, Red Lion; 
Mr. Bowers, Mr. J. K. Lehman, '12, 
Steelton; Miss Elsie I. Cocklin, Miss 
Fanny Farling and Miss Mable Eber- 
sole, of Palmyra. 



THE JUNIOR PLAY AT 
MYERSTOWN. 

On Saturday night, before a large 
audience in the Keystone Theater at 
Myerstown, the Juniors presented 
"The Private Secretary." The play 
was well received by the people, and 
many complimentary remarks were 
heard from that hostile town. The 
cast was hampered in their action by 
the small stage, but as all the actors 
had their wits with them they made 
good. Much credit is due Mr. Landis 
whose consistant work and strong 
effort made the play a financial suc- 
cess. He also by his thoughtfulness 
added to the physical comfort of the 
cast. 



Y. M. AND Y. W. C. A. JOINT 
SESSION. 

The monthly joint session of the 
Young Men's and Young Women's 
Christian Associations was held on 
Sunday in the assembly room of the 
library. "Paul's Missionary Jour- 
neys" was the subject. Mr. V. D. 
Mulhollen took up the First Mission- 
ary Journey, Miss Sara Zimmerman 
the Second and Miss Clara Horn the 
Third. Carl Snavely sang a solo. The 
meeting was well attended which 
shows that the heat does not affect 
the students of L. V. C. in their re- 
ligious devotions. 



THE GLEE CLUB BANQUET. 

As a suitable climax to a most 
successful season the Men's Glee 
Club on last Tuesday evening enter- 
tained the Ladies' Glee Club at 
Hershey. The clubs left for Hershey 
on the 7.45 car, arriving about 8.30. 
Caterer Kranse *aa anxiously await- 
ing us and soon had us seated around 
most beautifully decorated tables 
The tables were artistically grouped 
around a large f^mtain filled with 
blossoms of dogwood. Blue and 
white was the color scheme used in 
decorating the tables, while Leba- 
non Valley's pendants were hung in 
abundance around the cafe. After 
•doing ample just h e to the dainties 
placed before us, speech making was 
in order. These speeches were all 
witty and entertaining. Miss 
Schmidt and ProrWheldon both gave 
ng valuable suggestions, while Miss 
Spessard, '13, Mr. Klinger, '13, and 
Mr. Rodes, '14, were entertaining in 
their own well known manner. 

After spending The remainder of a 
most pleasant evening in playing 
numerous games a*d in dancing (?1 
we left for Annville. After a very 
enojyable time spent in Palmyra as 
the guests of the Traction company, 
we arrived home at — well in time 
for 7.45 class. 

The following menu was served 
by Mr. Krause: 

Grape Fruit Rice Soup 

Veal Croquettes 
Peas French Fried Potatoes 

Olives Pickles 
Frozen Custard 

Assorted Cakes Nuts 

Hershey's Chocolates 

Coffee Mints 
«•* 

THE BIOLOGICAL FIELD CLUB. 

On Monday night, last, the Bio- 
logical Field Club held its monthly 
meeting in the brological lecture 
room. The meeting was especially 
interesting because of the excellently 
prepared papers, and the wholesome 
general discussions Miss Clipping- 
er read a paper on "Some Observation 
of Fresh Water Annelids." After 
the reading of the paper she showed 
us the material as she had gathered 
it, and also pointed out the inter- 
esting features on a large model 
drawing she had made with colored 
chalk. 

Miss Lehman then gave an in- 
teresting talk on "Lichens." She gave 
us the life history of the lichens in 
general, and thety pointed out in- 
teresting differences. A large num- 
ber of native lichens which she had 
gathered and identified were passed 
around for our inspection, which 
lead to an interesting discussion. 
The meeting was a very helpful one 
to all the members present for it 
was instructive in every way. 



L. V. 8, ANNVILLE 5. 

Stickell's pitching on Saturday 
made it easy to hand out defeat to 
the Annville, Lebanon County League 
team by the score of 8-5. Our team 
was changed slightly having Spang- 
ler at shortstop, and Heffelfinger and 
Young in the field. The Annville 
aggregation started in the first in- 
ning and by hitting the ball hard, 
scored four runs. This was the bad 
inning for us and after it we did 
with the town team what we wished. 
Stiekell after the first inning settled 
down to steady work and pitched 
tight ball the rest of the contest. 
Spangler played a spectacular game 
at short and it was due to his work 
that several more runs were not 
scored against us. 

Our fellows hit the ball when it 
was needed and hardly a hit was 
wasted. Dearolf was again in great 
form, having three hits to his credit. 
The first time at bat, "Aby" hit out a 
three bagger which scored our first 
two runs. Stiekell kept the hits of 
our opponents well scattered so that 
they were not of much use in the 
tallying of runs. Score: 

ANNVILLE. 

R. H. O. A. E. 

A. Miller, rf 1 2 1 

Kuhlman, lb 1 2 7 1 

B. Miller, ss 1 

Heverling, rf 1 2 

Shenk, cf 1 3 

H. Miller, 2b 1 1 6 2 1 

Speraw, 3b 1 

Gingrich, c 1 1 9 5 

Witmyer, p 1 

Fields, p 2 2 3 

Levan, If 

Totals 5 9 27 15 3 

LEBANON. 

R. H. O. A. E. 

Spangler, ss 1 1 1 4 

J. Lyter, 3b 1 1 4 3 1 

Snavely, lb 2 2 13 

T. Lyter, c 2 2 6 2 2 

Dearolf, 2b 2 3 1 7 

Stiekell, p 1 2 

Lerew, cf 1 1 

Heffelfinger, If 

Young, rf 

Evans, If 

Totals 8 11 27 18 3 

Annville ...40000010 — 5 
Leb. Valley. .02400020 0—8 



Miss Yeagley, of Lebanon, visited 
friends at the college last week. 



Rex. the personal property of 
President Gossard, and the general 
property of the students, was injured 
so badly by the 4.30 train on Sat- 
urday that he had to be killed. His 
friendly nature caused his untimely 
death, for he was seeing some of his 
friends off. He was buried with fit- 
ting ceremonies at sunset by the stu- 
dent body. Everybody laments the 
loss of our mascot. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SHAKESPEARIAN PLAY. 

Folowing the long established 
precedent, the Christian Associa- 
tions will again precent a Shakes- 
pearian play during commencement 
week. 

Last year the associations gave 
"The Merchant of Venice," and it 
was a success in every way. Satur- 
day before commencement the cast 
gave it at Hershey. There it was 
well received, the large crowd giv- 
ing vent to their emotions by clap- 
ping several times. 

Commencement night it was pre- 
sented at the college, and the general 
verdict was one of praise. The cast 
was excellently trained and gorge- 
ously costumed; while the character 
interpretation and stage action was 
remarkably fine. Financially it was 
a success for at the home perform- 
ance the receipts were the largest 
ever received on any one evening. 

The new scenery, which was pur- 
chased last year, was used for the 
first time at this show, and it too can 
share in the grand success. 

This year the Associations are go- 
ing to give "As You Like It." Regu- 
lar practice has been going on since 
the return from the Easter vacation, 
and it will not be long until the play 
is well in hand. 

The folowinc people will play in 
"A« You Like It": 

The banished duke, J. E. Shark; 
r>nke Frededick. the usurper, B. G. 
T isrht: Amiens. Jaques, lords attend- 
inc the banished duke, H. M. Bender, 
ft. A. Williams - Le Beau, courtier to 
T^rerlerick. H. H. Charlton; Charles, 
the wrestler. F. E. Stenele: Oliver. 
.Tarmes. Orlando, pons of Sir Bow- 
land de Bois. C. Y. TTlrich. B. J. Bow- 
man. V. D. Mnlhollan: Adam, ser- 
vant to Oliver. P. L. Beddick; Touch- 
stone, a clown. L. R. Klingrer; Corin, 
Rilvins. shenherds. O. A. Richie, E. 
K. Boushter: William, in love with 
Audrev. F. E. Sten^le; First Lord. 
Second Lord, attending: the duk<\ R. 
M. Weidler. H. H. Charlton: Rosa- 
lind, daup-h+er to duke. Edith M. 
Tehman- Celia. daughter to Duke 
"Frederick. Helen E. PriehtMll: 
Phe.be. a sheoherdess. Edna E. Yar- 
kers: Audrey, country wench, Lottie 

^"<rq y(\ 



PROF. LEHMAN ENTERTAINS. 

Brof. Lehman again proved his 
ability as a host by entertaining the 
Mathematical Round Table last Wed- 
nesday evening Two programs were 
rendered. One was the regular pro- 
gram of the Round Table, the other 
was rendered by Brof. and Mrs. Leh- 
man. The latter was by far the most 
enjoyable to the members. After 
spending a very pleasant evening we 
bade each other good night and re- 
turned home to dream of that deli- 
cious cake and ice cream. 



PICTURE EXHIBIT. 

One of the finest, if not the best 
picture exhibit ever seen of the col- 
lege was taken to the General Con- 
ference, held at Decatur, 111., by 
President Gossard. 

This exhibit is for the purpose of 
showing the conference our build- 
ings, students, and surroundings. It 
contains pictures of the different 
classes, societies, athletic teams, glee 
clubs, and college buildings. 

One picture showing a panoramic 
view of the campus and buildings is 
especially fine. The buildings and 
surroundings of oar school are very 
fine, and the pictures in the ex- 
hibit are all good, so that anyone 
seeing it, cannot but be impressed 
with the fact that Lebanon Valley 
College is an excellent place to send 
their sons and daughters. 

MAY DAY. 

Since last year's May Day was 
such a success we decided to have 
another. It is to be held under the 
join auspices of the Y. M. C. A. and 
Y. W. C. A. Last year was our first 
attempt at having May Day and since 
it was so well attended we hope for 
even more success. It is our inten- 
tion to add several features this 
year. Miss Adam!.;, our able instruc- 
tor, has thought of working in a 
"Robin Hood" feature. With Miss 
Edith Lehman as May Queen we 
promise a pleasing entertainment. A 
luncheon will be served after the ex- 
ercises which we hope everyone will 
patronize as the proceeds go for 
sending delegates to our Eagle's 
Mere conference. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



Dr. Lehman, professor of Mathe- 
matics and Astronomy, left on Mon- 
day for Decatur, Illinois, to attend 
the General Conference. He will stop 
in Ohio for a few days and visit 
some friends. 



jCebanon l/alley 
Co/lege 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 

Sfcev. S. 0. Sossard, {President 
jfnnviiie, SPa. 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



"USSY'S" 

A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A, H. BIEVER. PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 



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Cfvll, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, IM.Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



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There is no quicksand more inV 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
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Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G, SPALDING £ BROS. 

26-1 JO Njssau St. 25 W. 42d St.. NEW YD""' 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 

Main Street Annville, Pa. 



THE SOCIAL HOUR. 

On Wednesday evening from six 
to seven o'clock the social hour, 
which has become a part of our 
weekly program, was spent. Instead 
of being held in the parlor of the 
ladies' dormitory, as formerly, it took 
place on the campus. The weather 
was perfect, and many of the stu- 
dents took advantage of the oppor- 
tunity, and joined in the games 
which were played. 

Those who did not care to play 
games took walks, and enjoyed them- 
selves in various ways. When seven 
o'clock and the time to again take 
up the books came, all voted that 
they had enjoyed themselves very 
much, and many expressed the wish 
that there would be a social hour 
every evening instead of only each 
Wednesday evening. 



DR. GOSSARD'S WESTERN TRIP. 

President G. D. Gossard, D.D., left 
on Thursday for a trip to the West. 
He went first to Baltimore, from 
there he went to Dayton, Ohio, where 
he attended a board meeting, and 
preached the annual sermon for 
Bonebrake Theological Seminary on 
Sunday evening. He will leave Day- 
ton on Tuesday for Decatur, 111., 
where he will attend the General Con- 
ference. He is a delegate to the 
Genral Conference from the Pennsyl- 
vania Conference, and is chairman 
of the committee on education. Dr. 
Gossard will be away for about three 
weeks. 



On Thursday evening the Ladies' 
Quartette, accompanied by Miss 
Brightbill, reader and Geo. F. Botts, 
bass soloist, made a trip to Avon, 
where they gave 'a concert in the 
United Brethren Church. 

Mr. Botts spent Sunday in Leba- 
non, where he sang in Salem's Unit- 
ed Brethren Church. 

Miss Ryland spent Saturday in 
Hershey. 

Rev. Joseph Daugherty, '89, of 
Columbia, visited his daughter, 
Mary, last week. 

Rev. J. A. Lyter, '85, spent Wed- 
nesday afternoon at the college with 
his sons, John and Tom. 

Mr. Von Bereghy, of Harrisburg, 
stopped at the college to see his son, 
M" v cel, last Tuesday. 

Mr. Elmer Kirkpatrick visited in 
Harrisburg part of last week. 

Mr. Paul Strickler, '14, who broke 
' H foot at the Penn Relay race is 
' '" to hobble around with canes. 

Last Thursday morning the stu- 
" Hs took charge of the chapel ex- 
-•"ises. The faculty was lawfully 
detained so the students in a spirit 
-' : "ood faith took charge, and made 
it i very impressive service. 

Misses Lulu and Amy Clippinger, 
of Chambersburg, visited their cous- 
in, Miss Florence Clippinger, last 
Fi iday. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 
JParties a Specialty 
H. B\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, F»a 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa 

For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO* 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

' Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 



RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. 8. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

A KULE 

'Tut this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardeen 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
ergj of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued 'as hopefully 
and as good haturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing positions. 

Every year since i!)o. r > we have been in need of 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school work. 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COLLEGE JNiEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday, May 13, 1913 No. 23 

[-class matter November 12, 1910. at the post office at Annville. Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



MAY DAY OBSERVED 
AT THE COLLEGE 



Thrilled with the joy of spring- 
time and animated by the spirit of 
May, the students of the college 
held a very elaborate May Day festi- 
val last Friday. Those who had it 
in charge gave it months of consid- 
eration and weeks of hard work, so 
as to have it beautiful and perfect in 
every respect. 

Several weeks before the event 
the student body, by popular vote, 
elected Miss Edith Lehman, '13, May 
Queen; while her four ladies in wait- 
ing, Misses Gingrich, Christeson, 
Bachman and Spessard, were ap- 
pointed by the committee. The oth- 
er participants were The Lord High 
Chancellor, John E. Sherk; The Lord 
Chief Justice, Charles Ulrich; Rob- 
in Hood. E. K. Boughter and Friar 
Tuck, L. R. Klinger. 

Shortly after 3 o'clock the May 
Queen, heralded by trumpeters, was 
ushered into the grassy throne room. 
The procession that formed her es- 
cort was four pages, crown bearer, 
the two lords, her maids in waiting, 
and twenty girls dressed in white 
with different colored sashs and 
hats. 

As soon as the queen ascended 
the throne the girls stood by and 
sang. Then the Lord High Chancel- 
lor made a speech telling of the 
origin of May Day and paying his re- 
spects to "the fairest maid of the 
village." 

The quartette sang before the 
throne and after this selection The 
Lord Chief Justice with fitting cere- 
mony crowned the queen. She then 
arose and spoke to her loyal subjects 
and told how she Would rule as 
Queen of the May. The girl then 
tried to amuse their chief by 
elected their own queen, and while 
they dance and sing around their 
champion Robin Hood's men come 
from the nearby copse and steal 
away the girls. Though frightened 
at first the girls soon see that there 
is no danger, for Friar Tuck assures 
them, and the men sing their forest 
song. 

Thus in pairs they dance around, 
bowing before the queen and as- 
sembling around the May Pole. 

To strains of music the girls do 
Continued on page 4 



BIZARRE STAFF. 1915- 

Editor-in-Chief — Philo. A. Statton. 

Associate Editors — J. O. Jones, 
Carl G. Snavely, Florence Mentz, 
Faber Stengle. 

Department Editors — Harry M. 
Bender, Larene Engle, Mary Irwin, 
Ralph Stickell. 

Business Manager — Paul J. Bow- 
man. 

Assistant Business Managers — I. 
Clyde Eby, Alvin Weaver. 

Artists — Vera Myers, Luther Mil- 
ler. 

Photographers — Frank Van 
Schaack, Belle Orris. 



We are glad to announce that on 
Wednesday, May 7 
a daughter was born 
, to President and Mrs. G. D. Gossard 



MISS HEINDEI'S RECITAL. 

The piano recital given by Miss 
Yelma Lucretia Heindel in the 
Engle Hall on Thursday even- 
ing was one worthy of high 
commendation. She revealed in 
the fullest measure the qualities 
requisite for becoming a pianist of 
great merit. She showed that she 
had a profound understanding of 
the widely differing characters of 
the six compositions which made up 
the program. 

The tonal balance and the crisp- 
ness of rhythm were marked fea- 
tures of her interpretation of Chop- 
in "Sonata in B flat minor," and 
Brahms "Scherzo, Op. 3." Gried "Con- 
certo in A Minor," was masterly 
executed, the orchestral parts of 
concerto were played on second 
piano by Mr . E. Edwin Sheldon, 
director of Engle Conservatory. 

The large audience demonstrated 
their approval of Schubert-Tansig 
"Marche Militaire, Op. 51" by giv- 
ing her rounds of applause. Mae 
Dowell's "Erzahlung" and "Kreis- 
leraina, Op. 16," by Schumann were 
well executed. 

Miss Heindel was ably assisted by 
Mis? Helen Brightbill, reader; and 
Mr. Bctts, soloist. 



Messrs. Mickey, Kirkpatrick and 
Von Bereghy attended the High 
School Track and Field Meet in Har- 
risburg on Saturday. 



L. V. DEFEATS 

GETTYSBURG 

One of the fastest games *.nat has 
been seen on Lebanon Valley's field 
this year, was the Gettysburg con- 
test on Saturday. The game was 
played quickly and it was a tight 
contest throughout. Stickell pitch- 
ed a great game for us, and it is to 
his credit that the game was won. 
He held the visitors whenever he 
wished and at the most critical 
times they were powerless to do any- 
thing with his delivery. 

In the first inning, our team 
started rather loosely and without 
anyone out the bases were filled by 
Gettysburg. Stickell tightened up, 
forced one man to make an easy out 
at the home-plate. Then on a hot 
hit to the pitcher, a double play was 
made. Stickell returned the ball 
home and from there it travelled to 
first base where the runner was 
easily retired. 

In the fifth inning Skeler, of Get- 
tysburg, had a home run from a drive 
into deep left field. It was an ex- 
tremely long hit and travelled with 
the wind. 

It seemed as if our team always 
got themselves out of a "hole" in 
the easiest manner possible, without 
allowing a run to score. Four dou- 
ble plays during the game made by 
us acted as a damper to every rally- 
ing spirit that Gettysburg could 
muster. 

In the fourth Spangler made a 
spectacular catch of a low infield 
drive and fielded it to first to com- 
plete a double play. Again in the 
eighth our shortstop "scooped" one 
into his glove, threw to Dearolf who 
in turn whirled the ball to Snavely 
for a quick succession off two outs. 

Out team did not get started in 
hitting till in the sixth when Spang- 
ler pounded out a single. After 
stealing second he was brought in 
by one of Snavely's timely long 
drives. Snavely also scored by fast 
base-running on a single from T. 
Lyter's bat. The score was thus 
made tie and our chances or winning 
grew larger. 

The winning run came •rn the 
eighth when Captain J. Lyter drove 
the ball into deep center ror three 
bases. Here again, Snavely came to, 
(Continued On page 2) 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieuus 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 

ESTA WAREHEIM '16 

Athletics 

PIIILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 

PAUL STRICKLER '14 

Music 

Q. F. BOTTS '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Subscription Price SI. 00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 

to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Administra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITORIAL. 

These bright and sunny days are 
very dangerous. Hidden among their 
smiles lies a deadly enemy to the 
human race. Do you know that the 
lovely, cool breezes, the inviting 
shade contains millions and millions 
of bacilli, all waiting to devour us? 
Yes, these horrible monsters are none 
other than the deadly germs of spring 
fever. These active little creatures 
have already attacked several of our 
number. You can see the effects of 
their poison in the slow walk, the 
sleepy attitude, the general restless- 
ness and desire to be anywhere but 
in class. Strange, isn't it, that 
Spring, lovely Spring, should bring 
such a menace to the general wel- 
fare of us all. 

Our professors, too, have noticed 
the effects for the ranks of students 
who attend their classes are gradu- 
ally falling off. While those who 
come are so listless that their reci- 
tation is often a failure. Do not mis- 
take me, not all the students are'suf" 
fering from this disease. There are 
some who are immune as yet but 
that does not say they will not finally 
succumb. Those who are now suf- 
fering from Spring fever can be 
well detected. They can be seen at 
almost all hours of the day reclining 
on the campus benches under the 
shade trees. The bell rings for class, 
reluctantly they take heed and be- 
gin to slowly wend their way to the 
administration building or perhaps 
they do not heed the bell at all and 
"cut" the class entirely. 



It is no wonder so many of the 
students have fallen victims. It 
takes great determination to hold 
out against these busy little bacilli. 
The sunny weather, the cool breezes 
tempt one to put aside everything 
and just loaf. Some are "affected" 
with a desire to go fishing, others 
betake themselves to the woods, 
studying is out of the question. 

I do not uppose that Lebanon 
Valley is the only one who is suf- 
fering from these enemies to man- 
kind for they roam about every- 
where and leave such bad effects be- 
hind. But we can bear with them 
for a short time, knowing they will 
leave us soon. So professors be pa- 
tient with the sufferers for they will 
soon come all right. 



MAY DAY 

Continued from page x 



the coursy and wind and unwind 
the pole while their gallants look on 
with watchful eyes. After the May 
Pole dance the men meet their part- 
ners and do the minuet marching 
round so as to form L. V. C. When 
in this position they sing Alma Mater 
and yells for the college, the Queen* 
May Day, and the Directors. Re- 
freshments were served at the 
Ladies' Dormitory after the corona- 
tion. 

The great success of the affair is 
due to the directorship of Miss 
Adams, who with persistence and 
patience planned the occasion and 
trained the performers. Miss 
Schmidt offered valuable assistance 
by directing the choruses, while 
all who helped on committees deserve 
praise. The May Day was a great 
success and may it ever live at Leba- 
non Valley. 



CLI0-KAL0 JOINT SESSION. 

The Clios were the guests of the 
Kalos in a joint session for the sec- 
ond time this year in Kalo halls on 
Friday evening. It was the end of 
a busy day and a fitting ending it 
was, for spirits were rejuvenated 
and friendships renewed. The pro- 
gram was faultless and was render- 
ed without a break. Perhaps the 
most unique part of the program was 
the Impromptu Class conducted by 
Miss Clippinger. The Olive Branch 
and Examiner proved to be a good 
combination. Dainty refreshments 
were served. The program follows: 

1. Selection College Quartette 

2. Book Review P. L. Strickler 

3. Impromptu Class. .Miss Clippinger 

4. Parody Miss Zimmerman 

5. Baritone Solo H. M. Bender 

6. Essay C. H. Arndt 

7. Instrumental Duet, 

Miss Heindel and J. F. Arnold 

8. Olive Branch and Examiner, 

Editors 



GEOLOGY CLASS AT CORNWALL. 

On Tuesday, last at 7 o'clock the 
geology class with Prof. Wanner 
left the college for Cornwall. Six 
of the men went in Dr. Walter's au- 
tomobile, the ethers in Mr. M. 
Light's, bus. Since there were more 
people than the bus would seat Mr. 
Harnish rode one of the horses for 
a while and Prof. Wanner rode on 
the rear steps of the vehicle. Mr. 
Harnish scon got tired of being 
bounced up and down on the horse 
and dismounted. Then* Mr. Richie 
tried bare-back riding. He too gave 
it up after a time. 

When they reached Bismarck 
most of the students got out of the 
bus for a drink cf water, and to 
jelly' workers in he factory located 
at that place. Mr. Carl liked the 
place bo well that he remained be- 
hind when the party left. By hard 
running he managed to overtake 
them before they had gone a great 
distance. The students amused them 
reiver on the journey by calling to 
the children and others whom they 
passed and by playing tricks upon 
one another. 

They reached Cornwall at about 
9:30 A. M.. and went at once to the 
mine which has been worked out. 
There they prospected for specimens. 
A numbed of interesting ones were 
found, amcng them being native cop 
per and serpentine. All of the 
members of the class including the 
three ladies, climbed the steep walls 
of the mine, which are about 150 
feet hiarh. At seme places, it was 
very difficult to get a foot-hold. 

At 11.30 the class sat down un- 
der the spreading branches of a 
cherry tree to enjoy the ample re- 
past, which they had brought with 
them, and which had been spread 
upon the grass in regular picnic 
style. 

Ater a half hour's rest the class 
went down into the mine where 
workmen were busy removing the 
ere. They enjoyed watching the 
huge steam shovels leading the ora 
on cars. Here too, they looked for 
specimens, and found some beautiful 
and rare ones. Prof. Wanner point- 
ed out the interesting features of 
the mine. 

At three o'clock tired and sleepy 
they left for home. They reached L. 
V. C. in time for supper. The day 
was an ideal one, and all agreed 
that they had an interesting and 
pleasant trip. 



L. V. MAN WINS PRIZE. 

Three L. V. men entered the three 
mile road race from Palmyra to Her- 
shey on Saturday. Mr. Paul Bow- 
man, '15, won third prize. The other 
men came in later. There were fif- 
teen men entered in the race. Those 
from school were Richie, Bowman 
and Ernst. Mr. Robert Hartz was 
manager. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



PHILOKOSMIAN. 

What, Where and When? — Sedic 
Rine. 

Country Town Philosophy — A. L. 
Weaver. 

Debate, Resolved, That the U. S. 
was justified in intervening in the 
California legislation affecting aliens. 

Affirmative — R. W. Stickell, O. E. 
Krens. 

Negative — Paul Witmeyer, John 
W. Lerew. 

Piano Solo — Lester F. Snyder. 

Myths of American History — Les- 
ter F. Snyder. 

Living Thoughts — Editor. 

KALOZETEAN. 

Prophecy — I. S. Ernst. 
Quartette — F. E. Stengle, P. B. 
Gibble, Harry Bender, Mason Long. 
Reading — Venling Jamison. 
Violin Solo — Donald Stangle. 
Presentation — Carl F. Schmidt. 
Chorus — Society. 

CLIONIAN. 

Reading, Josephine Urich; Sweden 
Valley Ice Mine, Mary Daugherty; 
French in The College Course, La- 
Rene Engle; Piano Solo, Blanche 
Black; The President, K. Bachman; 
Book Review, Ruth V. Kngle; School 
for Scandal (Imitation) Esther 
Heintzleman, Blanche M. Kisser, 
Florence Mentz, Viola Gruber. 



CALENDAR. 

Wednesday, May 14, 6 p. m. — 
Social Hour. 8 p. m., Sophomore- 
Freshman debate. 

Thursday, May 15, 8 p. m. — Miss 
Bachman's recital. 

Friday, May 16, 2.45 p. m.— Base- 
ball game; Susquehanna vs. Leba- 
non Valley. 7.30 p. m., Kalos en- 
tertain Seniors. 

Saturday, May 17, 3 p. m. — Base- 
ball game, Albright vs. Lebanon Val- 
ley. 

Sunday, May 18, 1.15 p. m. — 
Christian Associations. 

Tuesday, May 20, 8 p. m. — Miss 
Behney's recital. 



ITEMS OF INTEREST 

A number of couples took ad- 
vantage of the May season and had 
a house party at Mount Gretna. 
They report having had a delightful 
time. The following formed the 
party: Misses Bachman, Heintzel- 
man, Strickler, of Lebanon, and Carl, 
of Harrisburg, Seltzer, and Schmidt; 
Messrs. John Lyter, Tom Lyter, Ress- 
ler, and Charlton. 

Mr. Clyde Gerberich, a graduate 
of the Academy and now a senior at 
Gettysburg College, visited friends 
here on last Friday and Saturday. 
He is manager of the Gettysburg 
baseball team. 

Mr. and Mrs. M. S. Heindel, of Red 
Lion, attended the recital given by 
their daughter, Velma L., on Thurs- 
day night. They also witnessed the 
May Day exercises on Friday. 



Miss Mary Wolfe and Miss. Mae 
Sides, of Highspire, spent Sunday 
with Miss Josephine Mathias, '16. 

Last Tuesday evening Miss Mary 
Spayd, '16, entertained some of her 
class sisters at dinner. A very 
dainty and delicious menu was 
served. 

Mr. W. W. McConel, '12 academy, 
spent Saturday and Sunday at the 
college. 

Mr. Huber Heintzelman, '16, is 
building some flower beds on the 
campus. Mrs. H. F. Heintzelman, 
his mother, is presenting the flower 
plants. The News congratulates the 
donor and offers encouragement to 
the builder. 

Mrs. Frantz, of Lebanon, attended 
the May Day exercises. 

Mrs. Dubble and Mrs. Mease, of 
Myerstown, were May Day visitors. 

Miss Mary Whitmer, of Palmyra, 
visited friends at the college and 
witnessed the May Day exercises last 
Friday. 

Miss Yeagley, of Lebanon, attend- 
ed Miss Heindel's recital last Thurs- 
day evening. 

Miss Miriam Ellis, of Jonestown, 
spent several days at school last 
week. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



ALUMNI. 

"Johnnie" Lehman, '11, spent the 
week-end with his parents on Main 
street. 

A. K. Mills, '04, is the proud own- 
er of a "Cadillac," 1913 type. 

Prof. 0. Butterwick, '12, of Her- 
shey, visited the school and witness- 
ed the baseball game of Saturday. 

Rev. O. T. Ehrhart, '11, was one 
of the visitors at the May Day ex- 
ercises. 

Prof. W. A. Brunner, '11, of York, 
was at school last Saturday and wit- 
nessed the baseball game. He was 
accompanied by a friend, Mr. Good- 
felter. 



JZebanon 7/ a Hey 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System, 

Special Facilities in Chemist* y 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 

ttev. S. 0. Sossard, {President 
jfnnville, {Pa. 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



"USSY'S" 

A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 

ANNVILLE, PA. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 



4a£ 















: 3 






Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polytechnic institute 

%, SCHOOL of \\ 
'***% ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 

You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 

Quantity ✓ ✓ ✓ Quality 
Main Street 

"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment^^^ 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING I BROS. 

2 6-130 Nassau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YOEK 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 

Main Street Annville, Pa. 



Base Ball 



Continued from page 1 

the rescue and scored the winning 
run with his "cute bingle" over sec- 
ond base. 

Thus, by tight playing in pinciies, 
by timely hitting, and by good pitch- 
ing the game with Gettysburg Col- 
lege was won. In giving laurels, we 
consider Snavely, our big first-Pase- 
man deserving of a few. His game 
at his bag, was played in just such 
style as would become big league 
material. Stickell's pitching cannot 
be praised too highly and he held 
every batter at his mercy. Score: 
LEBANON VALLEY. 







R. 


H 


0. 


A. 


E. 






1 


1 


1 


7 


1 


J. Lyter, 3b. . , . 




1 


1 


1 


1 


1 






1 


2 


10 


1 





T. Lyter, c 




, 


1 


6 


2 


1 


Dearolf, 2b. 




. 





5 


3 





Statton, rf 



















Stickell, p 







2 


2 


2 





Larue, cf 










1 








Speraw, If 










1 








Totals 




q 


7 


27 


16 




GETTYSBURG. 












R. 


H 


0. 


A. 


E. 


Appier, rf 



















Monk, ss 







1 





1 





Skeler, 2b. 




1 


1 


4 


2 


2 


McCullough, lb. 










7 


1 





Mahaffe, c 







1 


9 


1 





Myers, 3b 







1 





1 





Kuhlman, cf. 




1 




U 








Hoart, If 







1 


Q 
O 





1 


Rohrbaugh, p. . 










1 







Totals 




•2 


6 


24 


9 




Leo. Valley.. 








2 


1 


X- 


q 
— o 


Gettysburg .0 





1 


1 





0- 


_2 



THE ACADEMY 9 

HERSHEY HIGH 8. 



In the second game of ine season 
with Hershey High the Academy re- 
trieved its defeat at Hershey to the 
tune of 9 to 8. The entire game was 
intensely exciting for the score was 
twice a tie. Both teams allowed a 
number of errors to creep into the 
game. Wrightstone pitcliea a good 
game for the Academy. Hocker did 
likewise for Hershey. O. P. Butter- 
wick, '12, is manager of the Her- 
shey High team. 
— .Se«pe- fry ■ iiri T l ggsT""' ~ x ""~' 

L. V. A 2 1 2 1 1 2—9 

Hershey H... 01200102 2 8 



CONSERVATORY NOTES. 

Miss Ruth Quigley spent a few 
days in Red Lion last week visiting 
her parents. 

The Students' Recital, given by 
students of the conservatory was 
well attended. Those taking part 
were: Misses Ryland, Wengert, 
Quigley, Brightbill, Hammer and 
Heindel. Messrs. Witman, Wr'ine, 
Krenz, Bctts and Arnold. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPCRTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffc Shoes 

W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 

H. K. LONG & SON 
Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, F»a 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving- 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa 

For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO^ 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 



RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU PREFER 

A. 8. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

A EULE 

' Put this down as A rule," says Dr. Bardeen 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." ,, 

- : Burtflg^wem^geYen "years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
ergj of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent 'inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperienced in securing positions. f 

Every year since 1905 we have been in need o 1 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near" 
ly every grade of public and private school work- 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COlihEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 

„y _ 

Volume V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, JVIay 20, 1913 Jio. 24 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pai., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



LEBANON VALLEY 
DEFEflTSJLBRIGHT 

The White and Blue Team 
Triumphs Over Old- 
Time Rivals 
6 to 3 

Albright! Ha! Ha! Ta! Ta! Tra la la! 
We know you all right, 
Saw you before, 
So au revoir; 

Ha! Ha! Ta! Ta! Tra la la! Albright! 

And we dismissed Albright, our 
time honored rivals, after drubbing 
Continued on page 2 



Track Team Takes a 

Place at Lafayette 

Lebanon Valley's track team com- 
posed of three men were sent to 
Easton on Saturday to compete at 
the, first annual track meet of the 
National Intercollegiate association, 
and there made a name for her school 
in track athletics. 

Von Bereghy was first place in 
the shot, third in the discus, and 
fcurth in the ham-mar and to him 
must be given the credit for making 
such a fine showing. A gold and 
bronze medal were won by him. 

Mickey qualified for the finals in 
b'th hammer and discus but on ac- 
count ot the ring being mads on 
the grass he fouled, unable to stay 
inride the seven foot ring. 

Kirkpatrick ran two splendid 
(Continued On pag^e .3) 




Big Enthusiastic Audience 
Greeted Speakers of 
the Two 
Teams 

Question, Resolved, That the 
President of the United States should 
be elected for a term of six years and 
that he be ineligible for re-election. 

Last Wednesday night the Sopho- 
more and Freshman classes thru 
their respective teams, had their an- 
nual inter class debate. Spirit was 
high and every speaker was greeted 
with rounds of cheers. 




LEBANON VALLEY'S 1913 WINNING TEAM 



COLLEGE NEWS 



By mutual agreement each speak- 
er was allowed twelve minutes to 
his debate, and one speaker on each 
side was allowed ten minutes for re- 
buttal. Prof. H. H. Shenk was the 
presiding officer and carried out 
these stipulations to the letter. 

Both teams debated in a master- 
ful and convincing manner so that 
it was difficult for the judges to 
make a decision. After due consid- 
eration the decision was made in 
favor of the affirmative, two against 
one. 

The debaters were: Sophomores, 
John O. Jones, Carl G. Snavely and 
Philo A. Station; Freshmen, D. 
Mason Long, S. Huber Heintzelman, 
and Ira Sankey Ernst. 

Judges for the debate were: E. 
E. McCurdy, Esq., of Lebanon, lion. 
Gabriel Moyer, of Palmyra, and 
Prof. F. D. Keboch, Hershey. 

After the debate the Freshmen had 
a party on the campus. 



LEBANON VALLEY 
DEFEATS ALBRIGHT 

Continued from page i 



theme severely with a 6-3 defeat. 
This contest which was the all im- 
portant game of the year was one of 
the most exciting ever seen on Leb- 
anon Valley's field. From the be- 
ginning everything was at the "boil- 
ing point;" players in their best 
trim and rooters with their heaviest 
yells. Stickell, our Cumberland Val- 
ley wonder, pitched ball which was 
the kind to history around a school. 
He was invincible at ati times allow- 
ing only three hits to a team acord- 
ed to be one of the heaviest hitting 
aggregations in Pennsylvania college 
teams. The longest and hardest hit- 
ters were content at times to be re- 
tired in the "one-two-three" fashion 
by "Stick." The e-.n-.re team play- 
ed a tight game around the captain. J. 
Lyter. When the "Red and White" 
would succeed in getting a man on 
base, our infield would c:ose up and 
retire him gracefully if at all pos- 
sible. Every man played his best 
and it was a well observed fact that 
the better team won. 

First inning. They: Pownall 
and Green easy outs on infield flies. 
Potteiger hit. hard to center field and 
by error got his base. Runner was 
advanced to second after Dearolf's 
bad handling of Benfer's hot 
"grounder." Inning, which was be- 
ginning to look dangerous, ended by 
Moll's striking out. 

We: Spangler hits to shortstop 
who has bad error, j. i^yter sacri- 
fices the runner to second. Snavely 
hits pretty single and Spangler 
scores our first run. ■£■'. i^yter and 
Dearolf out on outfield flies. 

Second inning. They: Beames- 
derfer, Hummel, and Yost struck in 



vain at Stickell's delivery. Three 
strike-outs. 

We: Stickell reaches first base by 
Pownall's error but is thrown oui at 
second a moment later. Larew de- 
cides not to hit the ball until he 
has had three swings, but umpire 
objects. Speraw gets base on balls, 
steals second. Second run is scored 
when "Polly" crossed home plate 
after Statton's hit. Spangler fails to 
connect with the ball and leaves 1 lii- 
plate disgusted. 

Third inning. They: Easy time. 
Scliiefly, Pownall and Green thrown 
out at first on assists by Stickell. 

We: J. Lyter "flies" out to Ben- 
fer. Snavely hit for a second time. 
T. Lyter hits to shortstop who helps 
complete a double play of which 
"Suave" and "Tom" were victims. 

Fourth inning. They: Potteiger 
walks to first. Benfer hit ana runner 
scores on a bad throw. Benfer out 
for interfering with ball at first 
base, Moll is hit by Stickell, steals 
second and scores on Beamesderfer's 
hit. Hummel is thrown out at first 
and Yost completes the period by 
hitting fly ball to Dearolf. 

We: Dearolf strikes out. Stickell 
produces a clean hit, steals second 
and scored ' on Lerew's bingle over 
shortstop. Speraw out on foul ball 
hit to Benfer. Statton strikes out. 

Fifth inning. They: Easy period. 
Pownall flies to Speraw for an easy 
out. Green and Potteiger thrown 
out at first by J. Lyter and Spangler, 
respectively. 

We: Spangler out at first. J. 
Lyter and Snavely out by misplacing 
hits so that Albright men could get 
their hands on them. 

Sixth inning. They: Benfer out 
on long hit into Lerew's glove. Moll 
declared out by Dearolf'c "pickups" 
and throw. Beamesderfer reaches 
first by error; steals second. Hum- 
mel thrown out at the "initial bag" 
by Spangler. 

We: T. Lyter by Potteiger's er- 
ror gets on first, is thrown out when 
trying to steal second. Dearolf fails 
to get in line with the ball and is 
called out on strikes. Stickell hits 
and gets on iirst. Lerew drives the 
ball on a low liner to the right field 
fence, and scores Stickell and him- 
self. Speraw strikes out. 

Seventh. They: Yost is walked 
by Stickell; steals second. Schiefley 
tries in vain to find Stickell's curves; 
called out on strikes. Pownall flies 
out to Spangler. Green reaches first 
and Yost scores on shortstop's over- 
throw to Snavely. Potteiger hits to 
Lerew making third out. 

We: Albert hits out a single; 
steals second. Tries to score on 
Green's overthrow to second, and 
Yost's bad throw to third, but is 
thrown out at home plate. Spang- 
ler and J. Lyter are easy outs for the 
outfielders. 

Eighth inning. They: Benfer 
declared out at first after a sensa- 
tional pickup and the throw from 



Spangler to Snavely. Moll hit for 
one base. Beamesderfer out on fly 
ball to Snavely. Hummel hits foul 
fly to first base and side is retired. 

We: Snavely loses his luck and 
is called out on strikes. T. Lyter 
hit far into left field for three bases. 
Dearolf sacrifices hit and scores the 
runner. Stickell retires side by hit- 
ting fly to third baseman. 

Ninth inning. Albright's last 
chance for the game ended with Yost 
striking out, Schiefly being put out 
at first base and Pownall popping 
and easy fly to Spangler. 

Stickell as soon as the game was 
finished among the cheers and 
shouts of hundreds was carried off 
the field to where a 'bus drawn Dy 
seventy-five fellows was" awaiting the 
team. Thus were the fellows who 
wore "Lebanon Valley" across their 
breasts, pulled down Main street and 
to the campus at the head of a great 
procession of rooters. Those who 
were unable to see the game, were 
first made aware of the victory by 
the jubilant ringing of the college 
bell pounding out the story of the 
game with a 6-3 rhythm. Although 
at the time of the game the rain was 
coming down at a pretty fast rate, 
the crowd kept pouring in onto the 
athletic field until all places of shel- 
ter were filled. The spirited cheer- 
ing for the rival teams helped to 
liven things till the game began and 
the contest put an enthusiastic 
warmth into every spectator. In- 
deed the clouds after the fifth seem- 
ed to realize that they were to stop 
the game and so quit their jobs. 
Score : 

LEBANON VALLEY. 





R. 


H. 


0. 


A. 


E. 




1 





9 

O 


4 


2 


J. Lyter, 3b 








1 


2 





Snavely, lb 





2 


9 








T. Lyter, c. ...... 


1 


1 


6 








Dearolf, 2b 








2 


2 


1 




2 


1 


1 








Lerew, cf 


1 


2 


2 








Speraw, If 


1 





2 








Statton, rf 





1 











Albert, rf 





1 











Totals 


6 


8* 


26 


•8 


3 


ALBRIGHT. 












R. 


II. 


0. 


A. 


E. 










1 


4 


2 










8 








Potteiger, 3b 


1 





2 


1 


1 


Benfer, lb 





1 


7 








Moll, 2b 


1 


1 


Q 
O 


2 





Beamesderfer, rf. . . 





1 


1 
















1 








Yost, cf 


1 





1 


1 





Schiefley, p 











6 





Totals 


o 


3 


24 


8 


3 


*Benfer out for 


interference. 




Earned runs: L. 


v., 


9 


9 
O 


base 



hit; T. Lyter. Home run, Lerew. 
First base on balls, Stickell 2, 
Schiefley 1. Struck out by Stickell 
6, Schiefley 6. Double plays Moll 
to Pownall to Benfer. Hit by pitch- 
er Moll. Time of game, 1.55. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



SPOTLIGHTS. 

One game nearer a clean sweep 
of the home season. 

Hits came when hits were needed. 
Five of them came just When they 
were needed to bring a wandering 
brother home. They were not mere 
singles either. The list included a 
three bagger and a home run. 

The students of L. V. C. are con- 
gratulating themselves on having 
found in their midst a pitcher like 
Stiekell. In every pinch he has 
shown judgment and form, worthy of 
long experience and training. This 
was never more apparent than when 
Gettysburg got the first three men 
on base and yet failed to score and 
again Albright had men on second 
and third and one down and failed 
to reach the scoring point. L. V. C. 
hp a never had a pitcher of whom she 
can be more proud. 

"This is a cinch," says Abie as he 
turns 2 and y 2 sommersaults, and 
tosses out Schiefly from a sitting 
posture. 

"Just the way I like them," says 
Johnnie as he scooped up Greelaugh's 
drive with one paw. 

Prof. Wanner said at the end of 
the fifth, "O, my! I should like to 
see it start to rain like the 
deuce? ! ! *" 

Larry started his club working 
with an old time motion. His two 
bagger and home run both brought 
anxious feet to the plate. 

Ike Statton rose to the occasion 
with two down in the second ses- 
sion and brought Stiekell home from 
second with a bingle. 

Albright's "big leaguers" expected 
to fatten their batting averages. 
However there appeared to be some 
obstacle in their way to first base. 

When the centerfielder pulled in 
his liner Snavely said "darn it." 

Manager' Ressler offered each 
player an extra stick of chewing 
gum. 

Charley Kelchner's arm is still 
good as b^e showed when he threw 
out the ne* ball. 

Petie Spangler's playing at short 
continues to be sensational and 
heady. His two mistakes can not be 
held against him in view of the wet 
ball. 

It's been many years since L. V. 
had a better day. A Lebanon Val- 
ley man also starred in the Middle 
States Athletic meet. Von Bereghy 
won 8 points. It should have been 
worth a little noise in the evening 
at least. 

Polly Speraw is showing himself 
to be a valuable man. He had a 
sensational catch in left field. 



L. V. 7— SUSQUEHANNA, 3 

As a practice game to get the 
team in condition for the great Sat- 
urday contest, the game with Sus- 
quehanna proved to. be just what 
was needed. The entire two hours 
and ten minutes spent in playing 
wa^f about as slow as fans care to 
see. Both teams were careless and 
played rather loose ball. However, 
Shenk, for us pitched a good game 
and had. no trouble in keeping the 
few hits of the visitors scattered. 

The game was peculiar in the 
number of long hit& made. Dearolf 
in the second inning hit out a hot 
one which netted him four bases. 
Stiekell in the same period "polerl 
the ball" to deep left fo three basi s. 
T. Lyter during the game connected 
with the ball for a" total of^ve bases 
Shenk alto made long and numer- 
ous hits, getting a three bagger and 
two singles out of four times at bat. 

This tcore of 7-3 put encourage- 
ment into the fellows and it was 
a sure thing that our big game 
would be one. 

The team leases next Friday for 
Selinsgrove where a return game will 
be played with Susquehanna. On Sat- 
urday Bucknel), is. played and with 
the team in the present condition 
there are great hopes of cur adding 
another victory to our list. 

Susq 2 1 3 5 5 

Leb. Val. ... 2 2 <) 1 1 1 x 7 9 3 

Track Team Takes a 

Place at Lafayette 

Continued from page 1 



races the 100 yard and 220 yard 
dashes, but he shewed the lack of 
training on a. track which Lebanon 
Valley unfortunately does n ot as 
yet have. 

This athletic meet goes to show 
what Lebanon Valley has within her 
school in the line of track men. If 
the track had been built in the fall 
as planned perhaps a different tale 
would have been "tolled" by the 
chapel bell. Next spring Lebanon 
Valley should have a great team and 
as the points scored on Saturday 
showed that we had a better team 
than Muhlenberg, Steven's Tech. 
and Rutges, why not win from La- 
fayette who took first place on Sat- 
urday. 



Y. M. C. A. 

The regular Y. M. C. A. meeting 
on Sunday was led by Mr. John 
Ness. He used for his subject "The 
Power of Prayer." He treated it in 
a very comprehensive manner and 
made many good applications. The 
meeting was very interesting but the 
attendance was below the average. 



PROGRAM FOR 
COMMENCEMENT 

Forty-seventh annual commence- 
ment or Lebanon Valley College, 
Annville, Pa., June 7 to 11, 1913. 
Exercises of Commencement Week: 
Saturday, June 7 — 7.45 p. m., 
Academy Commencement. 

Sunday, June 8 — 10.30 a. m., Bac- 
calaureate Sermon by President G. 
D. Gossard. 6.00 p. m., Union Camp- 
us Praise Service. 7.30 p. m., An- 
nual Address before the Christian 
Associations. 

Monday, June 9 — 1.30 to 5.00 p. 
m., Art Exhibit in Studio. 8.00 p. 
m., Exercises by the Graduating 
Class, Conservatory of Music. 

Tuesday, June 10 — 9.00 a. m., An- 
nual Meeting of Board of Trustees. 
2.00 p. m., Class Day Exercises. 3.30 
to 5.00 p. m., Art Exhibit. 7.30 p. 
m., Junior Oratorical Contest. 

Wednesday, June 11 — 1.0.00 a. m., 
Forty-seventh Annual Commence- 
ment. Orator, James P. Lichtenberg- 
er, Ph. U., Professor of Sociology, 
University of Pennsylvania. Confer- 
ring Degrees. 12.00 m., Annual 
Alumni Luncheon and Re-union. 
3.30 p. m., Base Ball, Athletic Field, 
'Varsity vs. Alumni. 8.00 p. m., 
Annual Play, As You Like It, 
Shakespeare. 

Trains on the Philadelphia and 
Reading Railroad. 

Leaves Harrisburg — A. M., 4.50, 
6.15, 10.30. P. M., 12.55, 3.45, 6.25. 

Arrive at Annville — A. M., 5.29, 
6.52, 11.06. P. M., 1.37, 4.30, 7.10. 

Leave Reading — A. M., 4.50, 7.00, 
10.11. P. M., 12.29, 3.10, 6.00, 8.40. 

Arrive at Annville — A. M., 6.14, 
8.08, 11.12. P. M., 1.38, 4.05, 7.10, 
9.35. 

Street car service every hour in 
the forenoon and half hour in the 
afternoon. 



Calendar. 

Tuesday, May 20, 8 p. m. — Miss 
Pehney's recital. 

Wednesday, May 21, 8 p. m. — 
Sophomore Minstrel Show. 

Thursday, May 22, 8 p. m. — Ann- 
ville High School Commencement. 

Friday, May 23, 7.15 p. m. — 
Philos entertain seniors. 

Saturday, May 24, 8 p. m. 

Shakespearean play at Hershey. 

Sunday, May 25, 1 p. m. — Chris- 
tian Association meetings. 

Tuesday, May 27, 8 p. m. — Junior 
Recital. 



Mr. Frank Brubaker, of New Hol- 
land, visited his son, Gerald, last 
Friday. He also witnessed the base- 
ball game between L. V. and Sus- 
quehanna. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College flecus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Students of Lebar.cn 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 

floeknce mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 

ESTA WAREHEIM '16 

Athletics 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 
PAUL STRICKIjER '14 

Music 
G. F. BOTTS '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 
HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 els. 

Address all business communications 

to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Adminis ra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



JOY IN THE WORK. 



There's joy in the work we're doing; 
There's love for the task of the 
day; 

For the Master sees and is caring 
What record we leave by the way. 

There's delight in a task accom- 
plished, 

And the heart's in a happy mood 
When our poor hands have wrought 
it, 

And God says, "It is good." 

No Avork in the world's too lofty 
To admit of some place for the 
heart; 

No act of the day too lowly 

Some grace for the heart to impart. 

And if our accomplishment's meagre, 
If we show not the requisite skill 

In solving some difficult problem, 
Or attaining some goal of our will. 

Let us still continue trying 

With a hope for hotter things; 

With the skill the trying gives us, 
And the joy the doing brings. 

And surely our work will grow better, 
And our days will brighter be 

If we strive for the best in our pgwer 
Both for now and eternity. 

FRANK M. VAN SCHAAOK. 



MISS OHM'S 
ORGAN RECITAL 

Miss Ora Bachman, the talentfi 
organist of Annville, gave her 
Son5oi recital on Thursday evening 
in the Engle Hall before a large au- 
dience. Miss Bachman presented an 
ambitious program which represent- 
ed the various styles of organ music 
patisfaetorily, and which gave her 
an opportunity to show her splendid 
technique and remarkable knowl- 
edge. She has been appearing in 
numerous concerts throughout the 
county If her work is to be judged 
from a practicable standpoint, she 
has indeed proved a success to her- 
self and an honor to Prof. Sheldon 
who so ably instructed her. 

Miss Bachman started her pro- 
gram with Lemmens "Sonata Ponti- 
Bcale." She is said to entertain an 
especial fondness for this sonata, and 
she played it as though enraptured 
by its beauty. It was very well re- 
ceived. The rest of her program was 
rendered in a rare fashion and ap- 
plause came spontaneously after 
every selection. 

Miss Bachman was ably assisted 
by Miss Josephine Urich, reader; and 
Mr. Philo A. Station, violinist. 



HOUSE PARTY AT GRETNA. 

Miss Mary Nissley, of Middletown, 
invited a number of her school 
friends to her cottage at Mt. Gretna 
to spend Sunday. The party say 
they had a very pleasant time. 
Those forming the party were 
Misses Edith Lehman, Lottie Spes- 
sard, Ora Bachman, and Mary Niss- 
ley, Messrs. George Botts, Paul Bow- 
man, George Haverstack and Clar- 
ence Barnet. Mrs. Nissley, of Mid- 
dletown, was the chaperon. 



ITEMS OF INTEREST. 

C. Howard McCann, a student in 
the academy, has discontinued his 
studies and has returned to his home 
in Freeland, Maryland. 

J. Arthur Wisner, of the academy, 
went home last Tuesday to attend a 
funeral. 

Misses Ruth and Larene Eng'e 
spent the week end at their home in 
IJummelstown. 

Mr. Lehman, of Chambersburg, 
visited his friend, Mr. S. Huber 
Heintzelman, '16, over Sunday; 

Mrs. Quigley, of Red Lion, visited 
her daughter, Ruth, for a few days 
last week. 

Last Friday night the Kalozetean 
Literary Society entertained the 
seniors. They had a very ' interest- 
ing program. The special features 
were the prophecy and the presenta- 
tion, during the latter number ap- 
propriate gifts were given to the dis- 
tinguished guests. After the pro- 
gramme refreshments were served. 



Y. W. C. A. 

"Rebecca" was the character dis- 
cussed in Y. W. C. A. The subject 
was divided into three parts. "Re- 
becca's early life" was discussed by 
Edna Yarkers. "Rebecca in her new 
home" by Elizabeth Rechard and 
"The Mother and her Sons" by Mary 
Spayd. There were many lessons 
drawn from the life of this woman 
although there was the selfish side 
to her character. 



NOTICE TO ALUMNI. 

The College is trying to secure a 
complete file of old catalogues. 
Copies of the College catalogues for 
the years 1868-1869, 1879-1880, 
1890-1891, and 1895-1896 will com- 
plete the files. Please carefully 
look at your old catalogues and if 
you have any of the above numbers 
please mail or send them to the 
Registrar. 



SUBSCRIPTION BLANK 

Enclosed please find One Dollar for College News subscrip- 
tion. Send News to following- address: 

Name 

Street 

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COLLEGE NEWS 



Contributions for Athletics for L. V. C. 



Believing- that successful athletics helps greatly to advertise 
the college, and to develop a wholesome college atftiosphere in the 
student body, and knowing that all the alumni and many friends 
are interested in the onward march of the school, we request that 
contributions be made to this fund by all who will do so. Any 
amount, however small, svill be greatly appreciated. Send all 
monies to Re/. W. H. Weaver, college treasurer. 

G. D. GOSSARD, Pres. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



SOCIETY PROGRAMS 

KALOZETEAN. 

Sketch, "Married Life," Messrs. 
Hallman and Oakes; piano solo, Fred 
Arnold; reading-, Harry Charlton; 
humorous story, (original), Moson 
Long; extempore; examiner, Editor: 
Paper, "Spring Fever and Its Reme- 
dies," Clyde Eby; chorus. 

PHILOKOSMIAN. 

Welcome to 1913.... R. M. Weidler 
Senior Class History, 

Paul J. Bowman 

Vocal Solo . . . . . : L. A. Rodes 

As We Know Them.... John H. Ness 
1913 Limericks. .1). Leonard Reddick 

Piano Solo U. Ellis Zimmerman 

What the Future has in Store, 

John O. Jones 
An Revoir L. M. Harnish 



ALUMNI. 



The class of 1910 will hold a re- 
union this year. Plans are being 
made, and every effort is being used 
to get every member to attend. 

Rev. J. Daugherty, of Columbia, 
visited his daughter, Mary, last Fri- 
day. 

Rev. J. W. Owen, '91, pastor of the 
nth U. B. church at York for tlio 
last two years, has been elected as- 
sociate editor of the Sunday School 
literature for our church. 

Mrs. B. F. Daugherty, and son, 
Carl, of Lebanon, left Tuesday for 
Westernville, Ohio, where they will 
spend a month with Mrs. Daugher- 
ty's sister, Mrs. W. G. Clippinger. 

Rev. C. J. Kephart, D.D., pastor 
cf th,^ First II. B. church, Dayton, 
Ohio, formerly President of the col- 
lege, was elected a bishop of the 
church. 



Attorney M. R. Metzger, '07, and 
wife of Middl'town, returned last 
week from a western trip. 

Rev. N. L. Leinbaugh, 'OS, paste* 
of the liershey [I. B. church preach- 
ed the baccalaureate sermon to ths 
graduating class of the Berry Town- 
ship High School. 



FUN WELL DONE. 

A preacher who went to a Ken- 
tucky parish was asked to invite the 
prayers of the congregation for Lucy 
Grey. He did so — They prayed 
thrae Sundays for Lucy Grey. On 
the fourth he was told that he need 
not do it any more. "Why" s aid 
the preacher, "is she dead?" "No," 
answered the man, "sh;> has won the 
J >erby." 



Yen can always toll a Boston wo- 
man, but you can't tell her much. 



vCebanon 2/a//ej/ 
Coilege 



First Class Faculty. 
Croup System. 

Special Facilities in Chcmishy 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 



Ladies in the Hall arc under the con- 
stant care of t tic Preceptress. 



IV rite por catalog ue 
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COLLEGE NEWS 



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Printers 



VALLEY SONG 



The following is a new Lebanon 
Valley song written by a loyal stu- 
dent. The News wishes to thank 
the contributor, and suggest that 
some more songs be added to our list. 

Tune: "Auld Lang Sync." 

To the O Lebanon Valley fair 

In homage true we bow; 
The sacred laurel we would wreathe 

Around thine honored brow. 

CHORUS. 
Dear Lebanon to thee 

Our songs we raise, 
And may the golden future bring 

Thy meed of praise. 

From cast to west our country o'er 

Thy children turn to thee; 
From Maine's stern shore to Golden 
Gate 

Where rolls the sunset sea. 

Thy beacon, Truth, upon our way 
Sheds bright its radiant glow; 

Oh! may we in the days to come 
Full honor to it show! 

How sweet the strains thy spruces 
play 

In sylvan symphony; 
While round thy towers the lofty 
elms 

Breathe soft their minstrelsy. 

And when each year the robin's song 
Proclaims returning spring, 

Before our eyes will rise the groves 
Where Lebanon's songsters sin ;. 

Dear to our hearts thy storied halls 

Where memories fond abound, 
Where wisdom true with power 
speaks 

Full many a word profound. 

And as the years successive pass, 
And ivy hides thy walls, 

Still will our hearts in answer leap 
When Lebanon Valley Calls. 

Frank M. Van Schaak. 



The Seniors are getting their final 
examinations this week. 

Several college fellows attended 
tbe circus at Lebanon last weak, 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



"What were you saying, Harold?" 
feebly asked thej young woman re- 
clining in the steamer chair. There 
was a pausa, and then the youn , 
man leaning over) the vessel's rail, 
responded, "I wasn't speaking An- 
gelina, you — you misunderstood me." 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES' and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Radcliffe Shoes 

W, D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neatcly done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a Specialty 
I T . F\ LONG & SON 

Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, I ' 

WM. WALTZ 

Hair Cutting and Shaving 



Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectioner 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO* 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

"Flower Brand" Potat 
Chips 

LEBANON, PA. 

RAH! RAH! BOYS EA 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT 'EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST A 
YOU PREFER 

A. 3. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

A KULE 

"tut this down as a rule," says Dr. Bardeen 
' that tin- teacher who rails against Teachers 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
nicmbcv.-hip or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others- the applicants who do ne» 
know how to utilize the services of an Agcnc 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
erg) of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our wcrtj 
nioi gthis line will be continued as hopefully 
mid its good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
tliiit most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one time inexperi-nced in securing nositirns. 

!• very vear since '905 we have been in need of 
more applicants to (111 the best positions in near? 
ly every grade of public and private school work. 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlan' 



I 




EGE 




LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volums V. 



Annville, Pa., Tuesday. May 27, 1913 



No. 25 



entered iis >t'ti !;ci-chiss mutter N< vemi.iT i_\ 1910. fit the i>o?x office at Annvil e. I'a.. under the act of March 3. 1 S79. 



L il. SHOWS 
WELL ONUSTTRIP 

SUSQUEHANNA, BUCKNELL TRIP 



Rain proved the undoing of two 
victories on one week end trip to 
Selinsgrove and Lewisburg. our 
team left school early Friday morn- 
ing in order to play a game in the 
afternoon with Susquehanna univer- 
sity. Rain began to drizzle faster, 
and faster till it become a steady 
downpour. At the time scheduled 
for the gome the field looked like a 
lake, hence, n game. The team 
was entertained royally by the Sus- 
quehanna fellows and declared by 
the "Rama Zama", given on depar- 
ture, what a fine day they had spent 
despite the rains. Manager Smith 
took his men into Sunbury ever night 
and at 11.35 Saturday morning they 
started for Bucknell. 

The day looked fine in the early 
morning, but toward noon clouds ap- 
peared in the sky, and showers did 
not seem improbable. 

BUCKNELL 4, L. V. C. 3. 

Playing o n a muddy field and in- 
terrupted by fitful showers the game 
Proved t be the most interesting- 
seen around Bucknell for a good 
many weeks. The contest took fif- 
ty seven minutes to play, a record 
time for this year. Stickell pitched 
s-ood ball and with the exception 
cf one inninp- kept the hits of his 
<-Doonents well scattered. However, 
the team did not support its pitcher 
and by loose Dlaying gave awav the 
s-ame. In reviewing the scorebook, 
one sees chance after cnance where 
the tide of the frame could haXQ 
been etnnir<H and a defect turned 
Jntn a victory. T n thp eiehth inning 
"•ith the score standing 4-3 aarainst 
i's. Tom Lyter hit the. ball over the 
railroad in rieht field for a home 
run - on roundine first the mud caus- 
ed him to slip and fell, and his hit 
'or four bases netted him but three. 



against us and playing poorly w e 
handed the contest to Bucknell. T. 
Lyter led in the hitting, having a 
three bagger and two singles out of 
four times at bat. Snavely playetf 
a tight game at first base, gathering 
everything into his glove. The team 
had its "off-day". Everything is Sac 
the Albright game at Myerstown on 
May 30 and our fellows will in shape 
to start up another list of victories 
to end the season. 

Bucknell 00200020 x-4 

Leb. Valley 1 2 0-3 



ss 




•s 





The last senior recital was given 
on Tuesday night by Miss Myri Beh- 
ney, of Lebanon, in Engle Hall. She 
was greeted by a large and apprecia- 
tive audience; some in the crowd 

were her club friends who came to 
sharp th*> graduation joys 

Mi?s Behney seamed to hr> in a hap- 
py mood, for her position at the or- 
gan was good and her execution ex- 
cellent. She showed herself to be 
thoroughly acquainted with her pro- 
gram, which was made up of selec- 
tions from six leading organ com- 
posers. 

Miss Behney is a present organist 
in one of the large churches in Leb- 
anon, and we are sure she will have 
a remarkably successful future in 
this position. 

Her program was interspersed by 
vocal and dramatic numbers. Miss 
Margaret Leitheiser was the reader, 
and Miss Myrl e Turby the soloist. 



Y. W. C. A. 

The Y. W. C. A. meeting on Sun- 
day was in charge of the White 
Shield Single Standard League. Miss 
Esther Heintzelman, vice-president of 
the league was the leader. She se- 
lected as her subject "Rescue Work 
in the Woman's Night Court of New 
York City". Miss Edna Yorkers 
read a. true story called "Her First 
Trip Alone." The meeting was a 
good one, and desevred a better at- 
tendance. 



GEJI'LCONFEREHGE 
HELPS EDUCATION 

OUR PROPOSED EDUCATIONAL 
SYSTEM 



The following was the report of 
the committee on education to the 
General Conference at its recent ses- 
sion in Decatur Illionis, 

The report was adopted and Rev. 
W. E. Schell, D. D., who for sixteen 
years was president of York college, 
York, Neb., was elected General 
Secretary of education. 

1. That the education be consti- 
tuted a distinct department of the 
church on a parity with Home Mis- 
sions, Foreign Missions, Church 
Erection and Publishing Interests. 

2. This department shall be con- 
trolled by a Board consisting- of 7 
ministers. 7 laymen and the bishops 
as members ex-officio. The members 
elected upon this Board shall, as far 
as possible, represent all sections of 
tho church. The nr-PsioVnts of nur 
schools shall be advisory members, 
only. 

3. This Board shall determine the 
number of colleges and academies, 
the standards for the various grades 
of institutions of learning and the 
co-operating territtory of each. Tn 

territory of pHcflrg- incftntinn 

the re-adjustment of co-operating 
Prard shall seek such an equitable 
adjustment as may be satisfactory to 
the conferences and institutions con- 
cerned. ,. 

4 There shall be a General Secre- 
tary of Education elected by General 
onference. 

5. The Board shall determine the 
number of colleges which grant the 
Bachelor degree. The remainder of 
our schools may be Junior colleges 
cr academies or may be discontinued, 
at the discretion of the Board. The 
junior colleges and academies shall 
co-operate with the standard colleges 
Continued on gaga 2 



1 



CO Ll.EG K N E YV S 



College Hecus 



Issued weekly during the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR TN-C iTTKF 

R. M. WEIDLEU '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 

KSTA WAREHEIM 'Hi 

Athletics 

PIIIEO STATTON '15 
Alumni 

PAUL, STRICKXER '14 

Music 

G. F. BOTTS '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 



Subscription Price SI. 00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
CI uds of ten, 75 c/s. 

Address all business communications 

to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room .22, Adminis ra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITORIAL. 

Once more the college year is 
drawing to 'a close' For some -of us 
it is the last year of our college, 
course. When in a few weeks the' 
commencement exercises are a thing 
of the past, the Seniors will have a 
new" world into which they must 
pass. No longer will the college be 
their home, no longer will it be a 
fester parent looking " out for their 
best interests. The time has come 
when they must face the stern real- 
ities of life, and bear the hunt of 
the battle of life alone. We are told 
by those who have gone before that 
our" college days are our happiest. 
This we can well believe, for when 
looking back over the happy years 
which have been spent at dear old 
Lebanon Valley, we see nothing but 
happiness. There may have been 
times when each one thought that 
there was little joy . in college life, 
but when the time comes to leave for 
ever it is with sadness that the fare- 
wells are said. 

Others of us who still have one, 
two, or three years before our time 



SCHEDULE OF EXAMINATIONS 

J'JNi 2-5 





MONDAY 


TUESDAY 


WEDNESD' Y 


THURSDAY 




French 1 


Philosophy .': 


Economics 2 


Education 8 




French 2 


German 2 


German 1 


English 1 







Greek 2 


English 2 








Bible 1 








Lut in 1 


Math'mVs 2 


History 1 


1 'hilosophy 2 




Latin 2 


Biology la 


Greek lb 


History .'5 




Latin .'5 


Chemistry •> 


English :J 








Greek 1 







to leave comes, may think that grad- 
uation is the happiest time which 
we have in our college life, but when 
we remember that a group of people 
as closely associated for four years, 
as a class in college is; who have 
stood shoulder to shoulder in many 
a class affair must part, then pros- 
pects take on a different aspect. 

The "News" wishes all the mem- 
bers of the Senior class the best of 
success in their graduation exercises, 
and especially the greatest success 
possible in their "Battle of Life". 



GENERAL CONFERENCE 

HELPS EDUCATION 

Continued from page 1 



in course of study, in students and 
every way possible in their respec- 
tive districts. The courses of study 
of like grade schools shall co-operate 
as far as possible, based upon the 
minimum of units a soutlined by the 
Board. 

6. No church school shall be es- 
tablished, discontinued, relocated, or 
consolidated with another without 
the consent of this Board, by a two- 
thirds vote of the entire Board. 

7. That our educational institu- 
tions collectively, including Bone- 
brake Seminary, plan to raise $1,- 
000,000 during- the quadrennium for 
endowment. Each school shall re- 
tain as its own all the money it 
raises for this fund. 

8. There shall be an education 
fund under the control of this Board 
to be raised by the secretary and 
meimbers of the Board, in the form of 
cash, gifts, death notes, bequests, 
etc. 

This fund shall be appropriated at 
the discretion of the Board. 

G. D. GOSSARD, Pres. of Com. 
C. M. BROOKE, Sec. of Com. 



SOPHOMORES GIVE 
MINSTREL SHOW 

Another number has been put on 
the list of social entertainments at 
L. V. C. For, following the custom 
in many of the larger schools the 
Sophomores gave a minstrel show on 
Wednesday night. That this enter- 
tainment will become permanent is 
evident from the large number of 
people present, and from the expres- 
sions of approval heard, both during, 
the program, and after it was ren- 
dered. 

Under the able management of 
Luther Miller, the boys organized a 
series of numbers that were equal tc 
those of a professional high pric-2 
show. The first part of the program 
was the minstrel show proper, in 
which the musical ability of the 
Sophomore boys was shown, both in 
solos and in choruses; and during 
which, to help the audience to bet- 
ter understand the sweetness of the 
music, jokes of different dimensions 
were yiven between the interlocutor 
and the end men. Though not all 
the most neurit. th n s^ jokes hplnpd 
to keep the sympathetic audience in 
the highest state of exuberance, and 
better prepared them for the classi- 
cal part of the program. 

In the minstrel show the soloists 
were Snavely, Bender, Lyter, Jones, 
Stengle, Statton, Weaver and Stick- 
ell. 

Betwen the two larger parts of 
the program a separate act by our 
famous dancer, Brenneman, was giv- 
ftn, who for five 'mumca, ;'put-iin a 
few shines", in the shape of fancy 
jigs, which he has learned from a 
life study of the g-entle art 

As a grand finish to a successful 
entertainment, Shakespeare's famous 



COLLEGE NEWS 



drama, "Midsummer Night Dream," 
was given. This was truly classical. 
Tha actors were Sratton. |Lyter. 
Jammison, Lerew, Stengle, and 
Snavely, who must have caused the 
famous poor, to turn in his grave 
from sheer ecstasy. 

The success that this number 
met show-; only too "well the ability 
of Prof. Kirkland in this respect, 
and should warn Miss Adams to 
guard well her laurels. 

As a testimony of regard and ap- 
preciate 1. Voiquft-; of onions, rhu- 
barb, rye, horse-chestnuts, etc., were 
showered upon the favorites by the 
different classes and individuals. 

When the curtains were drawn for 
the last time every one breathed a 
sis;h of regret and the minstrel show, 
amidst great applause, passed into 
history. » 



Items of Interest 



Prof C- C. Peters went to Philadel- 
phia on a business trip last week. 

Last Thursday evening those who 
eat at Miss Seltzer's table surprised 
her by serving ice cream, fudge and 
cakes after supper. Miss Seltzer had 
no idea that anything unusual was 
going to happen until the waiter had 
the ice crea m beside her. Even then 
she did not understand how it got 
there. Everyone enjoyed the occa- 
sion and the "eats'' very much. 

Misses Ora and CafriP^no T^aob- 
man entertained Miss Dora Ryland, 
Miss Ruth Quigley and Miss Velma 
Heindel at their home on Sunday. 

Abraham Dearolf, one of our all 
round atheletes and second baseman 
on our 1913 winning baseball team, 
left school last week. He is goinng 
to play professional ball and has 
rone to join his team. 

The Seniors were entertained by 
the Philokosmanian Literary Society 
on Friday evening. A very interest- 
ing program was rendered, after 
which an informal reception was 
held. 

Mis s Velma Mabel Stauffer, of 
Palmyra, a student in the voice de- 
partment, was married last Thursday 
to Prof. Christian R'sse p C3in«*H«»h 
principal of the Linglestown Hign 
school. Re". E O. Burtner. »flOp*r 
formed the ceremony. 

Prof Shenk gave several illustrat- 
ed lectures to his History class last 
week. The class and the visitors-, 
who took advantage of the oppor- 
tunity, appreciated the lectures and 
wish to thank Prof Shenk. 

Miss Maud Baker was In Lebanon 
last Monday on business. 



PRAYERMEETING 

Those who were at prayermeeting 
last Tuesday night enjoyed a great 
treat. Rev. Spayd talked on "Mak- 
ing the Most of It". He read as a 
scripture lesson the Feeding of the 
Five Thousand and applied the les- 
son to our college and life work. 
We surely can draw a beautiful and 
appropriate lessen from the loaves 
and fishes. Our work with God's 
blessing will reach farther and do 
more good. The lesson was well 
brought out and more of the students 
would be benefited if tlfey would at- 
tend these weekly proyermeetings. 



GO TO IT BOYS 



"AS YOU LIKE IT" 

Saturday evening, May 24th the 
Chfi-tians association-. < f t.hc college 
presented the Shakespearian play, 
"As You Like It" at the Hershey 
Theatre, under the direction of Miss 
May Belle Adams. 

The work of the cast was excel- 
lent and was well received by the 
small but appreciative audience. 

The play will be repeated in the 
college chapel during commencement 
week. 



Y. M. C A. 

The Sunday afternoon Y. M. C. A. 
meeting was full of good spirit and 
noble purpose. Mr. Brenneman, the 
leader, gave us a very strong and 
helpful talk. His subject was, "The 
Shining Light". Much interest was 
manifested and the meeting was 
helpful in every way. 



FRESHMAN CLASS OFFICERS 

President David J. Evans. 
V. President, John Long. 
Secretary, Viola Gruber. 
Treasurer, Conrad Curry. 



vCebanon fyalley 
College 



First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 



Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 



Write for catalogue 

&ev. S. *D. Sossardj ZPresidont 
jfnnville, ZPa. 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



USSY'S" 



A. S. MILLER. W. Main St. 



Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polytechnio Institute 

%, SCHOOL of V\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, IM.Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Ey^s Etamln^d, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 

You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 

• Quantity * ? * Quality 
Main St r set 




Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment. 
Ca'alogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING I BROS. 

2 6-130 Njssau St. 23 W. 42d St., NEW YORK 

Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 

Main Street Annville, Pa. 



Alumni 

j _ _ _ 

Mi-. William O. Ellis who graduated 
from college with the class of fdtl, and 
who for the past two years has )>een a 
teacher in the Iowa Stat^ College, 
recently passed t lie examination for 
the -Master's decree at that institution. 

Mr. Donald Cormany Keister, Ml', 
who entered the Harvard University 
School of Business Administration last 
fall, has had the honor to be one of the 
four men selected from his class to 
travel over the country this summer, 
-illu it rating the Harvard system of 
Accounting to all biy business houses 
wl.i.h request demonstrations. He 
win cover the Ea-tern part of the 
U-iiied States as far West as the State 
of Pennsylvania. 

Mr. Ro^er S. B. Hartz, 'OS, grad- 
uates as a civil engineer from Cornell 
this spring-. He was First Lieutenant 
of the Cornell Cadet Corps this year, 
and this summer will be located at 
Kjme. N. V. working on the istate 
Barge Canal. 

N. B. S. Thomas '12 spent the 
early part of last week here visiting 
friends. 

C. E. Rettew, '12 visited here on 
Monday, having finished his first 
year at the Bonesbrake seminary. 

J. W. Ischy '12, of Princeton sem- 
inary, visited here in the early part 
of last week. 

Edward Marshall, '11 a student in 
the medical department at the U. of 
P., has been honored by being select- 
ed as a member of the John Deaver 
Surgical Society. This society is 
composed of twenty-five honor men 
of the class. He was also asked to 
read a paper on his dissection of the 
muscle bands of the heart. 

Miss Mae Horner, '10 is going to 
take a course in botany this summer 
at The Biological Laboratory of the 
Brooklyn Institute of Art and 
Science, at Cold Spring Harbor, Long 
Island, N. Y. 

Oliver Butterwick, '12 visited the 
college last week. 

C. L. Shepley, formerly '15, ac- 
cepted a position as city editor of 
the Harrisburg Telegraph last week. 
He was formerly with the Philadel- 
phia North American. 



You are correct ii you get your 

LADIES 1 and CENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students Discount Packard & Padcliffc Slices 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main Sf. Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 
First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties* a S-ps-ciaJty 
H. F\ LONG & SOX 

Kefir Kayle Hotel Annville. Pa 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa 

For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY CF HALL'S CHOCO- 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 

Chips 

LEBANON. PA. 



RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS. 
YOU PREFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 

A RULE 

• Tut tins (town as it rule.'" says Dr. Bard ecu. 
'that the teacher wllw rails against Tea> hei* 
Agencies (zither has hccii refused [id mission to. 
iiK-ml t'i>hi|> or has tried to evade the payment 

of a just dcht." 

During t« onty-seven years of earnest* intelli- 
gent, aggioi-sive exi eiience with teacheis, we 
have Mind otheis— the H}>) diCBTitS who d:> not 
km u how to utilize the seivices of an Ageney 
and who leStnt suggestions. 

We devote at out om -fourth the time and en- 
eig> of ( ui organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and Jose animal y hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will he continued 'as hopefully 
and as good nil tu redly as heretofore; for we rind, 
that most ( four food, strong app ieants were at 
one ti'.iu inexperi -ncel in securing positions. 

Every yearsinee tti "> we have heen in need oi- 
nioie applicants to till the host positions 111 near- 
ly every grade of puhlic and private school work 

THE TEACHERS' AGFNCY 

R. L, MYERS & CO., 
Lcmcyne Trust Blc'g., Harristurg, Fa Co 
operating agencies in Denver ard Atlan a 



COIiliEGE flEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V. Annville, Pa., Tuesday, June 3, 1913 fio. 26 

Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3, 1879. 



Mill STUDENTS 
GUILJLCIIALS 

JUNIOR RECITAL. 

The recital given in the Engle Au- 
ditorium by the Juniors of the con- 
servatory was well attended, consid- 
ering the uncertainty of the date 
which was changed because of the 
sickness of one of the members. 
Miss Mary Painter, a member of the 
class, was confined to her home for 
a number of weeks thus making it 
very difficult to arrange for a date 
for the recital. 

The class as a whole acquitted 
themselves nobly, showing good tech- 
nique and a certain eminence not 
generally found in juniors of the 
pianoforte. 

Mr. J. Fred Arnold has the honor 
and proud distinction of being the 
only male member of the class. He 
justly deserves that distinction, for 
in his hands are held the destinies, 
which shall either guide to a peace- 
ful and romatic island of success; 
or to the orbit of some distant world, 
where the sun's rays of success and 
ambition have not yet pierced. 

But Fred is dependable. He can, 
and will, lead the rest of his class 
namely: Misses Light and Painter 
through another successful year. 

The class was ably assisted by 
Miss Velena Heindel, soprano; Miss 
Ruth Quigley, soprano; Miss Ora 
Bachman, pianist; Miss Anna Dub- 
ble, reader; and Miss Bensing, 
pianist. 

STUDENTS' RECITAL. 

The Students' Monday Evening 
Recital was one of the best enter- 
tainments of the season. The pro- 
gram consisted mostly of instru- 
mental and vocal selections, but sev- 
eral selected dramatic numbers were 
used to enliven the recital. 

Every person did their best, so 
there was no reason for criticism. 
The performers that made their first 



appearance did credit to themselves 
and their teachers, for they rendered 
their part of the program in a skill- 
ful manner. 

We always enjoy these musical 
treats and feel sorry that they are 
over for the year. 



CALENDAR. 

Monday, June 2, 8 p. m. — -Con- 
servatory Students' Recital. 

Tuesday, June 3, 6 p. m. — Prayer 
meeting. 

Wednesday, June 4, 12.30 p. m. — 
Athletic election. 

Friday, June 6, 7.30 p. m. — Socie- 
ties. 

Saturday, June 5, 8 p. m. — Acad- 
emy commencement. 

Sunday, June 8, 10.30 a. m. — Bac- 
calaureate sermon by President G. 
D. Gossard, D.D. 6 p. m., Union 
Campus Praise Service. 7.30 p. m., 
Annual Address before the Christian 
Associations. 

Monday, June 9, 8 p. m. — -Exer- 
cises by the Graduating Class, Con- 
servatory of Music. 

Tuesday, June 10, 8 p. m. — Junior 
Oratorical Contest. 

Wednesday, June 11, 8 p. m. — An- 
nual Play, "As You Hike It." 



THE STAR COURSE FOR 1913-14. 

Reader, Margaret Stahl; Musi- 
cales, International Quartet; Play 
Singers; Lecturers, Dr. Andrew John- 
son, Albert E. Wiggam. 

The Star Course Committee has 
arranged for the following numbers 
next year. The dates for the num- 
bers will be arranged later, but we 
are sure that they will be placed in 
a satisfactory manner. We judge 
from the numbers that this will be 
one of the best courses the school 
has ever had. 



Mr. Norman C. Schlichter, '97, 
State Y. M. C. A. Secretary of North 
Carolina, is dean of a summer Y. M. 
C. A. training school in that state. 
The school offers a two-year course 
for secretaries. 

Rev. H. B. Spayd, our college pas- 
tor, will leave for the Pacific coast 
this week on an extended visit. 



OUR BASE 
BALL SEASON 



One of the most successful seasons 
in base ball that has ever been 
known around Lebanon Valley will 
be closed after Albright is played on 
Saturday, June 7. With a record of 
having won half the games up to the 
present time the season may indeed 
be called one of the best. Manager 
Ressler is to be congratulated upon 
securing such an arrangement of 
games. From the start contests were 
so scheduled as to keep the men in 
the best possible shape. It was a 
mistake that the defeats at Mercers- 
burg and at Dickinson were not vic- 
tories. Both were lost by small 
scores and one slip meant the game. 
However, these two served their pur- 
pose in getting the men into con- 
dition for games later on. From the 
Carlisle contest on the fellows work- 
ed not as individuals but as a team. 
This fact was evident when the next 
game was played with Delaware on 
April 19. Working like clock-work 
they had no trouble whatever in 
defeating their opponents by the un- 
even score of 10-2. 

The Southern trip was next in or- 
der and accordingly the team start- 
ed out on the following Monday for 
Washington, D. C. The one main 
idea of this series of games was to 
get the team in the best running or- 
der for the all-important contest 
which was the next on our schedule, 
the Albright game. By playing such 
a series of the team began to pull 
together as it had not done before. 
It took two games for the fellows 
to get started, but they did and with 
the winning of the Washington col- 
lege contest a series of victories was 
started which was unprecedented. 
At Chestertown, playing with a team 
that defeated us the year previous 
our team walked away with the 
Continued on page 2 



- 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College fieuis 

Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
elorencic mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 

ESTA WAREHEIM '16 

Athletics 
PHILO STATTON '15 

Alumni 

PAUL STRICKLER '14 

Music 
G. F. BOTTS '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Subscription Price $1.00 per year 
Single Copies 5 cts. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 

Address all business communications 

ftO HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Administra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
■ege, Annville, Pa. 



EDITORIAL. 

Classes for this year are over; final 
examinations' are being conducted 
now, and next week we hold our 
forty-sixth commencement. These 
thoughts may bring joy to many, for 
■ to some, it means a new life, others 
;a new class standing, and still others 
feel the shifting of responsibility; 
but what attitude ought we to take 
at this time? We all know what we 
.should do, for the path of duty is 
not hard to find, but are we willing, 
by consistant effort, constructive 
thought and personal sacrifice, to 
do it. 

Every student at school knows the 
rough road over which our college 
has been jolted, and some of us can 
remember how we, by thoughtless 

-acts, have added to her burdens. But 
let us forget the injury we have 
done, and obliterate from our mem- 

i ory all our new formed destructive 
schemes; and in there places put 

•sane, noble, constructive thoughts 
which will help our schools tempera- 
ment and add to the material ad- 
vancement of our college. 

We are being tried in the fire, 
Dur case is in the balance, and shall 
we be found wanting in quality or 
weight? Let us not consider where 
we have failed and where we can 
fail again but rather let us lay plans 

ifor the success in the future. 



Site Prmfcfut m\h iFarultg 

mutest umtr prmttre at tb? ?xr rriiws of 

Gl0mm?nr?m?ttt Wttk 
lam &rtt?n to lElrtrcn 

iCrbannn Ballrcf (CiilUg? 
AnntriUr, |Ia. 



Beginning with this week we can 
do our college a great favor and 
make her stand higher in the col- 
legiate world by making ourselves 
better students. If we get to work 
and study hard and do our best in 
our examinations, in an honest and 
straight forward fashion, we can 
raise the scholastic standard of our 
school to such a place that gradua- 
tion on anything but merit will be 
a sin against college ethics. 

When we leave school for our vaca- 
tion we can talk good things about 
our college. Our successful year in 
athletics has made us better known 
all through the country, and now 
that we are advertised let us keep 
our school in the public eye by talk- 
ing about her. We need not say all 
the bad we know, for that is a poor 
way to better conditions, but rather 
let us say good, and nothing but 
good about the school, and say it in 
an enthusiastic manner. 

Let us encourage our friends to 
come here to school. If each of us 
would bring one new scholar next 
year we would pay in some degree 
"the debt we owe to dear old L. V. 
C." If our college work has meant 
anything to us it should make us 
anxious to get others to come to 
school. 

And so let us strive every way 
to build up our school during the 
summer vacation, for in that way we 
will increase our love for her, and, 
when upon our return, we gather at 
the station for the first time to give 
our college yell our hearts will burst, 
and the ointment of our enthusiasm 
will permeate and make fragrant the 
whole college year. 



NOTICE TO ALUMNI, 

The College is trying to secure a 
complete file of old catalogues. 
Copies of the College catalogues for 
the years 1868-1869, 1879-1880, 
1890-1891, and 1895-1896 will com- 
plete the files. Please carefully 
look at your old catalogues and if 
you have any of the above numbers 
please mail or send them to the 
Registrar. 



OUR BASE BALL SEASON. 



C ontinued from page I 



Rev. W. H. Weaver, treasurer of 
the college, preached in the Bethany 
United Brethren Church at Leba- 
non on Sunday night. 



game by a large score. The next day 
the fellows, travelling to Ellicot City, 
Md., handed out a pretty defeat to 
a college who had not been beaten 
on their home field for five years. 
Thus the team returned from its 
little trip into the South having won 
two out of four. Things were start- 
ed right and on May 3 the Annville 
town team proved an easy mark. 
The "bunch" was in prime con- 
dition and when they run up against 
Gettysburg on the following Satur- 
day, there was no trouble in defeat- 
ing them. Stickell now comes to the 
front after having won this game 
and seems to be the right man tc 
give us a victory over Albright, on 
Friday, May 16. Susquehanna jour- 
neyed to Lebanon Valley and depart- 
ed as easily as they came, with an- 
other defeat hanging on their score 
book. The game was characterized 
by the heavy hitting done by our fel- 
lows. Everyone was now ready for 
the reception of our old rivals and 
everyone seemed sure that the re- 
sult would be favorable. On Satur- 
day, May 17 the Albright game was 
played in a drizzling rain. Stickell 
pitched a wonderful game and was 
well supported. It was thus decreed 
that "Pop" Kelchner and aggrega- 



COLLEGE NEWS 



tion should return home with a "L. 
V. 7, Albright 3" ringing in their 
ears. The last two games played 
broke the line of victories, but that 
does not say that it has stopped it. 
In our last important game of the 
season it is a certain thing that a 
victory will be secured. 

SUMMARY OF GAMES. 



Opp. L. V 

Mercersburg at Mercers- 
burg 4 2 

Dickenson at Carlisle. 4 3 

Delaware at Annville... 2 10 
Georgetown University at 

Wash., D. C 10 4 

Delaware at Newark. ... 5 4 
Washington College at 

Chestertown 1 9 

Rock Hill at Ellicot City 2 3 
Annville A. C. at Ann- 
ville 3 7 

Gettysburg at Annville. . 2 3 

Susquehanna at Annville 3 6 

Albright at Annville. . . 3 7 

Bucknell at Lewisburg. . 4 3 

Albright at Myerstown. . 8 2 

51 63 



PHIL0K0SMIAN. 

Referred Question — If tea leaves 
has coffee grounds for divorce? C. K. 
Curry. 

Toasts — R. W. Stickell. 

Quartette — C. H. Zuse, S. H. 
Heintzelman, L. F. Snyder, A. G. 
Shaud. 

Debate — Resolved, That the girl I 
left behind favors my college course. 
Affirmative, A. L. Weaver, C. E. Bren- 
neman. Negative, J. H. Ness. J. 
O. Jones. 

Hints to Lovers — D. Leonard Red- 
dick. 

Oration — (Snyder Co. dialect), 
Sedic Sherman Rine. 

Selection — Scrambled Egg Orches- 
tra. Sitickel, (leader); Statton, 
(violin); Leister, (violin); Engle, 
(violin); Dehuff, (flute); Snavely, 
(cornet); Snyder, (cornet); Zimmer- 
man, (pianist). 

Y. M. AND Y. W. C. A. JOINT 
SESSION. 

The last monthly joint session of 
the Young Men's and Young Wom- 
en's Christian Associations for the 
season was held on Sunday afternoon 
in the library. It was fitting that 
the N meeting should be in charge of 
seniors. Mr. J. F. Leininger was 
the leader. In his talk he compared 
the Christian Associations to the 
Israelites under Joshua. He spoke 
of the way in which we influence 
our fellow students, and urged that, 
no matter where we spend the sum- 
mer vacation or what the tempta- 
tions may be, we be not lax in our 



Christian duty. Miss Lottie Spessard 
sang a solo. The meeting was a very 
helpful one, but owing to the ab- 
sence from school of a great many 
of our faithful members it was not 
so well attended. 



KALO OFFICERS 

Fall Term 1913-1914 
President, P. L. Strickler: V. Presi- 
dent, D. E. Young-: Rec. Secretay, T. 
B. Lyter, Cor. Secretary, D. M. Long-; 
Critic, J. B. Lyter: Treasurer, H. M. 
Bender; Chaplain, Geo. Hallman; 
Pianist, Luther Miller; Sargent-at. 
arms, M. Von Bereghy: Assistant Sar- 
gent-at-arms, Donald Stangle. 



Lebanon Valley was well repre- 
sented at Mt. Gretna over the week- 
end. There were three different 
house-parties there of L. V. students. 
The weather was perfect and noth- 
ing more could be desired for the 
best 'of times. The grove was at its 
prettiest and the trip was enjoyed by 
all. One of the parties was made 
up of Seniors with Miss Lucy Seltzer 
and Mr. Max Lehman chaperoning. 
They were Edna Yarkers, Clara 
Horn, Elizabeth Rechard. Edith Leh- 
man and O. T. Ehrhart, Victor Mul* 
hollen, Boaz Light, John Sherk. An- 
other of the parties consisted of Ruth 
V. Engle, Belle Orris, Ruth Quigley, 
Dora Ryland, Florence Cristes on, 
and E. Kephart Boughter, G. A. 
Richie, Howard Olewiler, Landis 
Klinger, Victor Heffelfinger with 
Miss Ella Brightbill as chaperon 
The third party with Mrs. Weaver, 
chaperone, was composed of Lareuc- 
Engle, Mary Irwin, Vera Myers and 
Florence Mentz, Mr. George Dehuff, 
David Evans, Alvin Weaver and 
John Lerew. * 

jCebanon 7/ a Hey 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemist* y 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 
&ev. S. <D. Sossard, ZPresidcni 



GO TO IT BOYS 

ITS 

Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 

AT 

"USSY'S" 

A. S. MILLER, W. Main St. 

Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTASLE 



A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 



ANNVILLE, PA. 






WINDSOR HOTEL 

W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2.50 per day and up 
















Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
■ reputation and consequence in 

1 PHILADELPHIA 











Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

%, SCHOOL of V\ 
*4% ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Catalogue. TROY, N.Y. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at 

COLLAM'S 

Quantity * * * Quality 
Main Street 



"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality, 

Tennis, Golf, Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment, 
Catalogue Free. 



A. G, SPALDING L BROS, 



,6430 Njssaa St. 23 W. 42d St. 



NEW YORK 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Items of Interest 




Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



Mr. Forrest S. Hensel, '12, of Lyk- 
ens, and Mr. Fred Frost, '11, of Leba- 
non, attended the 10th anniversary 
of the founding of Hershey on May 

•30 th. 

Mr. K. T. Mathias, of Highspire, 
visited his daughter, Josephine, last 
Friday. 

. .Miss Hope Renn, formally of the 
class of 1916, spent Sunday at the 
college visiting her friends and class- 
mates. 

Counsel members — Lester A. 
Rodes, Charles H. Arndt, Edward 
Mutch, D. Leonard Reddick, Edward 
H. Smith. 

Mr. Verling Jamison; '15, left on 
Friday for his home in Indiana. 

Mr. John F. Leininger, '13, has 
been elected to a position in the 
Chambersburg High School. 

Mr. Leininger was principal of 
one of the grade buildings before he 
came to school here. 

Mr. Landis R. Kllnger, '13, has 
been elected instructor in science in 
the Bessemer High School, Bessemer, 
Michigan. 

I. Moyer Hershey, Secretary of the 
Hershey Y. M. C. A., will deliver the 
annual address before the College 
Christian Associations. 

President G. D. Gossard delivered 
the oration at the Memorial Day ex- 
ercises at Annville. 

Prof. Max F. Lehman, '07, of Bal- 
timore, visited his parents, Dr. and 
Mrs. J. E. Lehman over Sunday. 

Mr. Thomas Pell, ex-'16, of Sun- 
bury, spent Sunday in town with 
friends. 

Mrs. Anna M. Bierman, wife of the 
late Dr. E. B. Bierman, a former 
president of the college, is visiting 
friends in Annville. 

Mr. Ralph Gonder, ex-'16, of Lyk- 
ens, visited friends at the college 
over Sunday. 

The Executive Committee of the 
college held a business meeting last 
Tuesday. They made some new pro- 
gressive plans for the college. 

Junior Class Officers — President, 
Henry E. Snavely; Vice-President, 
Josephine Urich; Secretary, Leray B. 
Harnish; Treasurer, Paul Strickler; 
Historian, Catharine Bachman; Poet, 
Carl Schmidt. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 1 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' Discount Packard & Fadcliffe Shoes 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Fubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St. Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 
Hire 

Parties a tSpecieilty 

H. F\ LONG & SON 
Rear Eagle Hotel Annville, Pa 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO- 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa. 



Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON. PA. 

RAH AH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU REFER 

A. S. MILLER W. MAIN ST. 



A RULE 



'Tut this down as a rule." says Dr. Bardeen 
"that the teacher who rails against Teachers- 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
membership or has tried to evade the payment 
of a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers, we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agency 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the time and en- 
erg\ of our organization to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefully 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were as 
one time inexperienced in securing positions. 

Every year since J9(>5 we have been in need o- 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near 
ly every grade of public and private school work- 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO,, 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlanta 



COIiliEGE HEWS 

LEBANON VALLEY COLLEGE 



Volume V. 



flnnville, Pa., Tuesday, June 10, 1913 



Ho. 27)T>3 



Entered as second-class matter November 12, 1910, at the post office at Annville, Pa., under the act of March 3. 1879. 





Slumber Party 

One of the most enjoyable events in 
the social life of the school at this 
season was the "Slumber Party," 
given by Miss Florence Clippinger, to 
the girls of the Senioi Class on Tues- 
day and Wednesday, June 3 and 4. 
Nut only was the evenc an enjoyable 
one, but showed in its uniqueness the 
originality of the hostess. 

The eight girls in the class spent 
together the hours before midnight 
singing and chatting on the balcony of 
the southeast corner of the Girl's 
Dormitory. They had a general good 
time, one of the enjoyments of which 
was the refreshments. It was past 
midnight when they retired, if it 
might be called retiring. 

The uniqueness of the p^rty, how- 
ever, was in the breakfast served at 
seven o'clock. The hostess had 
carried out her plans without the 
knowledge of her guests, and great 
was their surprise when they were 
ushered into another room and beheld 
a table bea"tfully adorned with 
flowers and food. 

In the matter of decorations this 
was entirely a class affair. In the 
center of the table was a huge bunch 
of red clover from which trailed out 
clover leaves in groups of three and 
four. The girls amused themselves 
for several minutes trying to find 
''good luck." At each place the 
hostess had placed a dainty menu card 
to which was tied the class flower by 
the class colors. 

The breakfast itself was delicious 
and was thoroughly enjoyed. At the 
close of the repast a photographer 
snapped pictures of the happy girls. 
At nine o'clock the party was over 
ana all departed after having voted 
Miss Clippinger "a jolly good 
fellow. ' ' 

Continued on page 3 



The Last Defeat in D R G D 
a Victorious Season 




L. V. VS. ALBRIGHT 

A series of "balloon ascensions" 
increasing in number, height, and 
variety, caused the game on Saturday 
afternoon to end in an ignominious 
score, Stickell, our prodigy of a 
pitcher, who remained invincible for 
two games, with Albright, allowing 
only nine hits in the both, could not 
hold out in the last contest. A hard 
hitting team like our opponents would 
be sure to find a pitcher's curves in 
three games, and it is nothing to our 
pitcher's discredit that he was hit un- 
mercifully in the Saturday engage- 
ment. The team behind Stickell did 
not support him as it should and bv 
bad play after bad play and error after 
error, helped the score assume the 
enormous proportions that it did. The 
once unconquerable aggregation of ball 
tossers has been depleted by the loss of 
players end has been falling off in 
practice until it was in no condition 
to play the most important game of 
the season. 

Scheifley, the pitcher supposed to be 
unhit able on hot days, was pounded 
from the box in two innings. Avon 
Light was put in to pitch by "Pop," 
and kept our boys to one scratch hit 
the remainder of the contest. 

A series of "ifs" may be offered, 
and had any of which been heeded, a 
victory would have been certain. The 
last part of t he season has not 
amounted to much owing to a long 
series of ''becauses" However, 
taking the season as a whole, it may 
be accounted to be a3 successful as 
any in the past, having won seven and 
lot a similar number of contests 

The score : 
L. V. 21000000 0-3 

Albright 1 1 2 4 2 2 1 1-14 



Spring Athletic Election 

Base ball manager, Edward H. 
Smith, '14; assistant, John H. Ness, 
'15; basket. baO manager, J. Allen 
Waiter, '14; assistant, John O. Jones 
'15. 




COMMENCEMENT WEEK BEGINS 
WITH SUNDAY SERVICES 

Once sgain our seniors are ready to 
leave these halls. Baccalaureate 
Sunday has once again come around 
We can hardly realize that we must 
bid farewell so soon The services 
were heldfin the New°United Brethren 
church The students gathered in 
the chapel and marched down to the 
church by classes the Seniors in caps 
and gowns following the faculty. 
Then came the Juniors, Sopomores, 
Freshmen and "Preps" The pro- 
cessional was something new and was 
very impressive. 

Dr. (i. D. Gossard our new end 
highly esteemed president delivered 
the address He chose the very appro- 
priate subject of "The Practical 
Christian" His remarks were the 
most timely and interesting that could 
have been said. The church was 
crowded with eager listeners and not 
one word was missed. 

A choir of eight voices was selected 
and the music was very good. Miss 
Katharine Schmidt, instructor in 
voice, sang a beautiful solo. 

The services were enjoyed by all 
and we students feel proud of our 
Seniors who arranged for such a pro- 
gram, our fine president who delivered 
the address and our beautiful singers. 



Prof. Johnson Enter- 
tains English Class 

On Tuesday afternoon the class in 
English literature was entertained by 
Prof. Johnson in her apartments, to a< 
pink tea. The tables were well 
arranged so the party was kept to- 
gether. Refreshments were delicious 
and entertainment charming. Witty 
remarks were passed around with every 
course. After thanking the hostess 
for her hospitality the class left, with 
sweat memories of English III. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



College jSLeuus 



Issued weekly during- the College 
Year by the Students of Lebanon 
Valley College 

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF 

R. M. WEIDLER '14 

ASSOCIATE EDITORS 
florence mentz '15 
John b. lyter '14 

Social 
ESTA WAREHEIM '16 

Athletics 

PIIILO STATTON '15 

Alum ni 

PAUL STRICKLER '14 

Music 
G. F. BOTTS '14 

BUSINESS MANAGER 

HARRY CHARLTON '14 

Subscription Price SI. 00 per year 
Single Copies 5 els. 
Clubs of ten, 75 cts. 



Address all business communications 

to HARRY CHARLTON '14 all Other 

matter to Room 22, Adminis. ra- 
tion Building Lebanon Valley Col- 
lege, Annville, Pa. 



Editorial 

Once more the year is drawing to a 
close; examinations with the worry 
a id cramming which accompanies them 
are a thing of the past, and live only 
in our memory. Commencement time 
is here the happiest time of *he year, 
since we have nothing to do but enjoy 
ourselves In a few days, however, we 
Vart. Some of us never to return 
except as visitors, others looking for- 
ward to the dreamv autumn days, 
When again the halls of Lehanon 
Valley shall resound with life 

From now on let us all look forward 
to next j ear, let us try to make it 
the best year we have ever had. We 
students who come from all parts of 
the country, can do more to help the 
college, than an army of representa- 
tives. Boost it in your community ; 
tell prospective students the good 
things about it, and its advantages. 

It is never too early to make good 
resolutions. Begin now, before you 
leave. Resolved to come back and 
study so that the professors will never 
have to flunk you, or stretch a point 
to pass you. Go home then with 
the resolution firmly fixed to do all 
you ean for the school during the vaca- 
tion, and to do all for it you can 
when you return. 

The "News" closes the year by 



wishing the seniors all the success 
possible in life; the remainder of the 
student body a very pleasant vacation, 
ana express the wish that ycu all 
return in the fall and pay your 
"News" subscription the first thing. 

Commencement Visitors 

The following are some of the com- 
mencement visitors— Mrs. Lerew and 
daughter, of Dillsburg, are visiting 
John Larew ; Mr. and Mrs. Mulhollen, 
of WUmore, are visiting: their son, 
Vicor; Mr. and Mrs. S. L. Ressler, 
of Shamokin, are visiting their son, 
Ivan; Rev. and Mrs. Boughter, are 
visiting their son, Kephart; Mrs. 
Richie and daughter, Madge, are 
visiting G. A. Richie; H. Howard 
Hoy, "99, and wife, of Millersburg, 
Mr. and Mr3. Wert, of Millersburg, 
and Mr. and Mrs. Hutchison, of 
Intercourse, are visiting Mr. and Mrs 
Mark H. Wert: Paul Loser, who grad- 
uated at Muhlenberg this year, is 
visiting friends; Guy Wengert, '12, is 
here for commencement; Wilbur 
Harnish, '20. and Clair F. Harnish, 
'12, are visiting their cousin, LeRay 
B. Harnish; Horace W. Crider, '93, 
of Homestead, is a visitor here; Mrs, 
Ryland and niece, Helen, are visiting 
Miss Dora Ryland; Miss Zimmerman 
is visiting her sister, Sara; Mr. Roop, 
of Harrisburg, is visiting Harry 
Ulrich; Mrs. Trostle and son, James, 
of Dillsburg, and Miss Ruth Stein- 
hauer, of Lemoyne, are the guests of 
Treasurer and Mrs. Weaver; Mrs. 
Snavely, of Danville, is visiting her 
son, Carl; Rev. R. R. Redes, of 
Wormleysturg, is visiting his son, 
Lester; Miss Eliazbeth Lau, '12, of 
York, is visiting friends. 

Philo Society Renders 

a Comic Program 

The annual comic program, given 
by the Philokosmian Literary Society, 
was rendered last Friday night. The 
hall was crowded with visitors and 
members, and though it was very hot, 
the attention was excellent for the 
numbers were all humorous. Every 
performer did well and many school 
jokes were given— coth true and manu- 
factured. The program was a 
decided success, for it drove away all 
the a ter tests left by examinations 

Dr S. D. Faust, professor of church 
history at Bonebrake Theological 
Seminary, Dayton, Ohio, visited the 
school last week and addressed the 
ministerial students. 



The Senior Dinner 

One of the prettiest and most 
pleasant of the Senior functions was a 
dinner given to the class by th e 
"town trio," Misses Ctristeson, 
Lehman and Spessard, on the spacious 
lawn at the Christeson home, Thursday 
evening, June 5th, at 6:30. The 
tables were appropriately decorated 
with crimson clover, the class flower, 
and with numerous candles which 
were lighted as darkness approached. 
As the sun sank slowly to rest and 
the faint outline of the new moon 
could be seen in the western sky, one 
was impressed that even nature was 
doing her best to make this occasion a 
happy one for the Seniors. 

The Seniors wore the usual black 
caps and gowns 

The dinner was served in four 
courses. 

Tomato bouillon Wafers 
Fried chicken Peas 
French fried potatoes 
Asparagus on toast 
Tomato salad 
Vanilla ice cream Strawbeiries 
Coffee Nuts Candy 

This was followed by toasts from 
various members of the class. The 
remainder of the evening was spent 
in playing jelly ganus and in strolling 
to the nearby bridge. Ail returned 
home in the mid-night hour, feeling 
that it is good to be a Senior. 



Specimens Presented to 

School by Mrs. Derickson 

A large number of botanical speci- 
mens beautifu ly pressed, mounted, 
and framed, have been placed in the 
Biological reception hall between the 
professor's office and the laboratoy. 
These specimens were collected and 
mounted by Mm. S. H. Derickson. 
We apprecaite them, for we feel that 
they are valuable gifts, and they are 
also very pretty. 



Clionian Literary Society 

Install New Officers 

The officers of the Clionian Literary 
Society for the first term next year, 
were installed last Friday night. 
They are as follows: President. 
Josephine Urich; vice president, 
Blanche Risser ; recording secretary, 
Vera Meyers; corresponding secre- 
tary, Larene Engle; treasurer, Mary 
Daugherty ; chaplain, Ethel Houser; 
critic, Belle Oris; pianist, Ruth 
Quigley; editor, Viola Gruber; judges, 
Helen Oyler and Mary Spajd. 



COLLEGE NEWS 



Subscription Card Bizarre 1914 



E. H. SMITH, 

BUSINESS MANAGER, ANNVILLE, PA 

Please send to the undersigned copy of the BIZARRE 

1914 for which $1.50 per copy is herewith enclosed. 

NAME 



ADDRESS 



GO TO IT BOYS 



ITS 



Russ Brothers 
Velvet Ice Cream 



AT 



USSY'S" 



THF 1114 R 17AR R F Academ V Commence- 
ment a Success A. S. MILLER. W. Main" St. 




Hie long expected Bizarre 1914 has 
made its debut into Lebanon Valley 
society, and has certainly fulfilled the 
greatest hopes that were entertained 
by the Jm'ors. The remarks about 
it were all favorable, except from 
those who were "slammed" in its 
pages, and even the Sophomores say 
that it is "pretty good." Thtre are 
many new features in the volume 
which distinguish it from its pre- 
decessors both in appearance and con- 
tents, the leather cover ana colored 
page in seris being meat remarkable 
in this respect. 

The staff deserves great credit in its 
painstaking efforts to produce a year 
book which would reflect the student's 
side of life at L. V. The task must 
have been no easy one, judging fiom 
the uniformly high class of the con- 
tents of the volume, but, "ow that 
the work is compleled. the Juniors 
can justly feel proud of the editors 
and Bizarre. 



'Farewell Tea' 



Continued from page i 



Miss Helen Brightbill delightfully 
entertained the Senior and Sophomore 
girls at her home Friday afternoon, 
June 6. The tea was informal; the 
girla passing the time by chatting and 
embroidering. The sewing ability of 
the guests was tested when each 
•one was given a piece of muslin, 
needle and thread, and told to make a 
"gift" for another girl Miss Edith 
Lehman won the honurs. Mifcs Clara 
Horn received a prize for the best des- 
cription of one of the girls present. 
Delicious refreshments were served. 



FIFTH ANNUAL EXERCISES 

The annual graduating exercises of 
Lebanon Valley Academy were held 
Saturday evening, June 7, in the 
Engle Conservatory. The following 
persons constituted the graduating 
class: Russel E. Hoffer, Mabel E. 
Snyder, Allen J. Meyer, Harold W. 
Kisser and Oscar E. Krenz. The 
following program wa& very creditably 
rendered Invocation, Rev. Paul D. 
Witman; President's address, Russell 
E. Hoffer; Essay, The Right Use of 
Time, Harold W. Kisser: solo, The 
Promise of Lifp, Cowen, Mrs. Ida M. 
Shelden; Patrick Henry, the Agitator, 
Allen Meyer; Class History and 
Prophecy; Essay, The Dawn of a 
Brighter Day, Mabel E. Snyder; piano 
solo, Kruslerana No 2, Velma B. 
Heindel; oration, The Southern 
Continued on pa«e 4 

Jlebctnon 1/ alley 
College 

First Class Faculty. 
Group System. 

Special Facilities in Chemistry 

and Biology 
Music, Art, Oratory 

Ladies in the Hall are under the con- 
stant care of the Preceptress. 

Write for catalogue 

S?e». S. *D. Sossard, President 
Jfnnviiie, !Pa. 



Washington Hotel 

HOMELIKE AND COMFORTABLE 

A. H. BIEVER, PROP. 
MAIN AND CHESTNUT ST. 



ANNVILLE, PA. 



WINDSOR HOTEL 




W. T. BRUBAKER, Manager. 
European, $1.00 per day and up 
American, $2-50 per day and up 




Midway between Broad Street 
Station and Reading Terminal 
on Filbert Street. 

The only moderate priced hotel of 
reputation and consequence in 

PHILADELPHIA 



Rensselaer Polyieshnic Institute 



SCHOOL of \\ 
ENGINEERING 

Civil, Mechanical, Electrical 

Send for a Cataloaue. TROY, N-Y« 



COLLEGE NEWS 



D. B. SHIFFER 
GRADUATE OPTICIAN 

Eyes Examined, Glasses Fitted, Broken 
Lenses Replaced, anything in 
the Optical line 

East Main St ANNVILLE 



You get only the best at 

G OLLAM'S 

Quantity ✓ * , Quality 
Main Street 



"The 
Leader" 



THAT'S 
ALL 




Standard Quality 

There is no quicksand more un' 
stable than poverty in quality and 
we avoid this quicksand by standard 
quality. 

Tennis, Golf. Base Ball, Cricket, Foot Ball, 
Basket Ball, Athletic Equipment, 
Catalogue Free. 

A. G. SPALDING L BROS. 

i-iliO Njssau St. 25 W. 42d St., NEW YORK 



Journal Publishing Co. 

Printers 



Main Street 



Annville, Pa. 



Academy Commence- 
ment Exercises 

Continued from page 

Triangle, Oscar E. Krenz; address, 
Rev. A. K. Weir; pres.ntation of 
diplomas, Pres. G. D. Gossard. 

In the address of the evening Rev. 
Weir very splendidly brought to the 
class the "Messages of the Twentieth 
Century." According to the speaker 
the 20th century brings three messages 
to the graduate: First, Unparalled 
opportuntiy; second, great responsi- 
bility; third, to every graduate the 
present century says, "go to college." 

The merit scholarship of $130 
awarded each year to the honor grad- 
uate of the Academy, was equally 
divided between Harold W. Risser.. of 
Carnpbelltown, and Oscar E. Krenz, 
of Uillsburg. 



Items of Interest 



Prof. McCulIough. science instruc- 
tor in the Waynesboro High Scool, 
visited the school last Friday. 

Miss Bettie Otto, of Wilkensburg, 
and Miss Katharne Moser. of High- 
spire, students at Eastern College, 
Manassas, Virginia, visited Miss 
Josepine Mathias, last Friday. 

Mr. Lehman Leister, a fotmer stu- 
dent, but a presentt a railroad mail 
clerk, spent several days at school last 
week visiting his brother. 

Miss Naomi Seltzer, of Washing- 
ton, D. C, is visiting her cousin, 
Prof. Lucy Seltzer 

Professors S. H. Derickson and IT. 
. HShenk attend the dedicatory ser- 
vices of the masonic home at Eliza- 
bethtown last Thursday. 

G. A. Richie has secured the posi- 
tion of private secretary to Dr. D. J, 
Burell, of the Marble Cobegiate 
Church. 

Mr. Floyd E. Shaffer, '10, a senior 
in the medical department of Johns 
Hopkins University, visited his Alma 
Mater last Tuesday. 

Rev. Victor 0. Weidler, '10, 
stopped at the college for a few hours 
last week. He was on his way to 
fcJrie where he will assist in evan- 
gelistic work during the summer. 

Mr and Mrs. Waiter Esbenshade, of 
the class of '08, were at the Albright 
vs. Lehanon game on Saturday. 

Rev. A. K. Weir, '00, pastor ot 
Zion U. B. Church, Reading, delivered 
the address at the Academy commence- 
ment on Saturday night. 



You are correct if you get your 

LADIES 9 and GENTS' 
FURNISHINGS 

At KINPORTS', Annville, Pa. 

Students' D iscount Packard & Radcliffc Slioes 

W. D. ELLIOTT 
Shoemaker 

Repairing neately done. Rubber work a 
specialty. 

Patronage Solicited 
Main St, Annville, Pa. 

LIVERY 

First Class Teams to 

Hire 

Parties a Specialty' 

H. F\ LOXG & SOX 
Rear Ke-igle Hotel A-nnA-ille. F>a. 

WM. WALTZ 
Hair Cutting and Shaving 
Saloon 



W. Main St. 



Annville, Pa 



For Cakes and Confectionery 

GO TO 

Bowman's Bakery 

A FULL SUPPLY OF HALL'S CHOCO* 
LATES. ALWAYS FRESH 

W, Main St. Annville, Pa. 

Home-Made Noodles, Peanut Butter 

H. B. FLOWERS 

Manufacturer of 

''Flower Brand" Potato 
Chips 

LEBANON. PA. 



RAH! RAH! BOYS EAT 

Raw Oysters at "Ussy's" 

OR EAT EM STEWED OR FRIED JUST AS 
YOU REFER 

A. S. MILLER W, MAIN ST. 

A RULE 

' Put this down as a rule," savs Dr. Bardeen 

that the teacher who rails against Teacher*. 
Agencies either has been refused admission to 
Daembership or has tried to evade the payment 
ot a just debt." 

During twenty-seven years of earnest, intelli- 
gent, aggressive experience with teachers we 
have found others— the applicants who do not 
know how to utilize the services of an Agenev 
and who resent suggestions. 

We devote about one-fourth the- time and en- 
ergj of our organjzation to preparing these ap- 
plicants and lose annually hundreds of vacancies 
through their persistent inefficiency. Our work 
along this line will be continued as hopefullv 
and as good naturedly as heretofore; for we find 
that most of our good, strong applicants were at 
one Urns inexperienced in securing positicns 

Every year since 1905 we have been in need of 
more applicants to fill the best positions in near- 
ly every grade of public and private school work 

THE TEACHERS' AGENCY 

R. L. MYERS & CO., 
Lemoyne Trust Bldg., Harrisburg, Pa Co 
operating agencies in Denver and Atlan